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Telling off for self testing

Discussion in 'Diabetes Discussions' started by Atad heavy, Feb 4, 2019.

  1. Andydragon

    Andydragon Type 2 (in remission!) · Moderator
    Staff Member

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    It's unfortunate some medical professionals are not properly informing. But in a 10minute consultation it's not enough time to explain just how serious this condition is but how it can be managed

    We have to take this into our hands. Yes there is a cost for strips etc but we have to take our care into our own hands. It's a shame when the professionals actively pushback (low carb, self testing etc) as it feels like we have to keep secret what we are doing. I wish more doctors would see it more positively
     
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  2. Nicole T

    Nicole T Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I won't be keeping anything a secret. I've told the nurse that I'm doing low carb and not filling the prescription for Metformin. She was perfectly positive about it.

    In my dealings with the medical profession, they've (with one exception) always acted to advise and assist in managing conditions rather than tell me what I had to do. This isn't the first time I've declined prescribed medication (after reading the potential side effects) and decided to follow a treatment path I felt was better for me. I've never been challenged or warned that I was doing it wrong. My decisions and actions were respected.

    That one exception? The time one of the GP's at my local surgery tried to put the fear of whatever in me for being overweight. Going on about leaving my wife a widow and my son an orphan. How would they cope without me? I just heard her out and left at the time. I was a different person, then. She'd get both barrels if she tried it now.

    I think if anyone gave me 'a telling off' for trying to manage something my own way, I'd tell them in no uncertain terms that they were crossing a line. They are the service provider and you are the customer. It sounds like some need reminding of this.
     
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  3. Crocodile

    Crocodile Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Mine auto adjusts to the test solution.
     
  4. Mr_Pot

    Mr_Pot Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    What type of meter is it, I haven't heard of that technology?
     
  5. Crocodile

    Crocodile Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Sorry, haven't checked in for a few days. It is a One touch meter. Uses the code on test strip box and the solution. I prefer to use the Accu-Chek these days though as it has better logging and Bluetooth.
     
  6. DCUKMod

    DCUKMod I reversed my Type 2 · Master
    Staff Member Administrator

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    @Ajax - I'm absolutely not an advocate of going under the radar, with testing, or anything else. My feeling is, if we test, amend our diets, or whatever, and we see success, if we keep what we have done to ourselves, the medics will have it confirmed to them, by our omission/withholding information, that their recommended course of action has been successful, so testing/changes or whatever is indeed unneccessary.

    Where I have told medics my approach, and that I am self-funding, they haven't pushed back. I mean; how can they tell me how to spend my own, hard earned cash? They can't - provided what I propose is not illegal.

    Once I have then been able to show results (73>37 in 4 months, and always a chuck lower than 37 since), they have no grounds for arguments - especially when they review my overall health markers.

    I would rather not get into a charade of falsehoods or information drought with health care professional. I work on the basis I am more likely to need them in the future than they are to need me. I need a cordial relationship with them.

    For me, I see my journey, living with diabetes, or other health conditions, as being a mutual educational programme.
     
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  7. JohnEGreen

    JohnEGreen Other · Master

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    My DN has had twenty eight years experience of treating diabetes she is in full agreement with me testing and fully supportive my GP knows I test and no longer attempts to argue me out of it there is no need to hide the fact that you self test like some naughty child sneaking a quick fag behind the bike shed you are not doing any thing wrong in fact you are doing absolutely the right thing.
     
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  8. lucylocket61

    lucylocket61 Type 2 · Expert

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    However, having to interact with a diabetic nurse who is hostile to our methods of treatment is hard for some. Especially as they are our gateway to checks and tests. Some can be obstructive, and a struggle at every appointment is soul destroying. Yes, we can complain, but it's tiring and frustrating, and often counterproductive.
     
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  9. JohnEGreen

    JohnEGreen Other · Master

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    The thing is not to let yourself be intimidated into conforming to someone else's notion of what is best for you when you know with certainty that you are right and they are not if you allow them to do that then things will never change take a leaf out of Quentin Crisp's book and be bold yes he got a lot of stick but was never
    daunted.:)

    I know easier said than done.
     
  10. lucylocket61

    lucylocket61 Type 2 · Expert

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    I feel hurt by this reply, to be honest.

    Do you know how many people have anxiety? Or serious confidence issues?

    Quite apart from the very real danger of being struck off by the surgery and labelled non compliant or a trouble maker - even if people are respectful to staff.

    In some areas there is no other GP or nurse to go to.

    Please can you be more sensitive to those who, for a variety of reasons, smile and nod and do the right thing privately.
     
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  11. JohnEGreen

    JohnEGreen Other · Master

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    My apologies was not thinking clearly you of course are quite right to scold me for my insensitivity on this occasion I just get so mad for people when they are intimidated into conformity and become anxious such pressure should not be placed on people.:sorry::sorry:
     
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