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Tough day after Lantus overdose

Discussion in 'Type 1 Diabetes' started by Fatima_94, Mar 2, 2018.

  1. Fatima_94

    Fatima_94 Type 1 · Member

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    I’ve had a really tough day today. I couldn’t go into work as I felt like I was in a trance all day, as if I was completely lifeless.

    I woke up very low and then went back to sleep after treating it with juice. I slept for hours during the day. My sugars kept going low throughout the day and I felt really down about my diabetes. Makes me think, why can’t I just be like others my age who don’t have diabetes and are going about their life as normal productive people with nothing holding them back?

    I graduated last year with a First Class honours grade in my history degree even though I had many tough days with diabetes so I know that a lot can be achieved whilst being diabetic but I guess today just brought out some negative emotions and made me question whether I can really cope in the real world..

    anyone else ever feel like this? Any advice to keep me going?
     
    • Hug Hug x 8
  2. NoKindOfSusie

    NoKindOfSusie Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I can't tell you anything useful, other than that I have thought about not much other than this for months. You are not alone. I cannot stand the feeling of just being useless. I'm not saying you're useless, your life is for you to evaluate, but the reality that no matter what I do I will always be second best to absolutely everyone is just in my brain every day.
     
  3. Guzzler

    Guzzler Type 2 · Master

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    "Second best to absolutely everyone...."? To who, exactly? Certainly not to me. I have multiple conditions and if offered I would swap them to be T1. I do not know what it is like to have T1 but I do know what it is like to greive for my younger, healthier self. Back when I had no idea what the future held. My conditions have taught me a few things, though. One of them is that self pity gets you nowhere, it is a complete waste of time and energy and ultimately squanders opportunity.
    You sound as if you may need some counselling or perhaps Talking Therapy of some kind. This type of negativity will wear you out. Please talk it over with your HCPs, just take that first step.
     
  4. Sharrryn

    Sharrryn Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hang in there Fatima. Type 1 is a tough tough disease. Sorry I can't offer any real advice. I've had similiar feelings lately also. I would just love to be like everyone else and not be constantly worried about this disease. I've had high blood sugar and ketones today for unknown reasons. I got is sorted eventually but it had me in tears for hours.
    Be proud of what you have achieved in spite of it. Take it day by day.
    I pray for a cure one day for all of us.
    Sharrryn
     
  5. Leeannea

    Leeannea LADA · Well-Known Member

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    Everyone has days like this, with or without diabetes. Just ask your friends and colleagues. At least we have a reason for it that we can work on and so improve things! Reflect on what you’ve achieved and don’t let the odd down day let you lose confidence and self belief and prevent you from achieving more! Best wishes, Leeanne
     
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  6. Innocent

    Innocent · Member

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    Firstly congratulations on getting your degree that in itself shows you have the discipline, strength and determination to cope with diabetes. It’s just a case of refocusing that same energy to cope with the challenges that may lay ahead.
    I’ve been T1D for 28yrs now but I still remember what it was like to be ‘normal’ and wishing so hard it hurt I could go back. I was 15 at the time. The first year was a novelty but then the novelty wore off yr 2 when the reality hit that this me forever, it was awful. I felt like I had a label on me everyone could see and couldn’t imagine ever being able to cope.
    What I want to say is it does get easier, yes it takes time but the more you look after yourself and keep your sugars stable the easier it’ll become to feel more like you did pre diabetes. You’ve had a blip with the Lantus error but hey it happens. The down your feeling is normal when your sugars have been skewed and I m surewhen your levels recover you’ll feel better in yourself too.
    Be kind to yourself look after your health and your body and life will be as close to normal as it is for anybody without diabetes...Maybe even healthier than most these days as us diabetics have no choice but moderate our eating and drinking to survive. Best wishes. X
     
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  7. phdiabetic

    phdiabetic Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Well at least you survived the lantus! I feel the same as you do about 'how can I function in society', I fail at basic things like showering, dressing, walking to class...all of those make my blood sugar drop. How can I possibly show up at 9am dressed, clean and ready to work when I can't even get dressed like a normal person?

    But you sound like you are coping ok, apart from this one bad day. You made it through uni - so you will also be able to get a job and work like a normal person despite diabetes. Sure, you will take some days off due to diabetes (maybe a mistake with your doses like today, maybe something else goes wrong) but everybody takes time off for illness occasionally, so I'm sure your employer will understand. Good luck at your job
     
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  8. Fairygodmother

    Fairygodmother Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    The ‘real world’ is full of people who sometimes can’t cope and they’re not all T1. It’s easy to think we’re useless at being ‘normal’ but usually the feeling doesn’t last and a good day or two may diminish yesterday’s wipeout. I know that @NoKindOfSusie may disagree as she’s in a bad place about T1. I hope that it all gets less distressing for her by the end of the first year of living with, it’s the tough stage for some.

    I know how it feels to lose time to rotten blood sugars and have felt I’d been given less of a life than others. I’ve also railed against the hard work and vigilance it sometimes takes to get the balances all working properly only for something seemingly simple to throw it all off course again. I came to the conclusion that even though I’d love not to have T1 there was nothing I could do about that so I’d just have to make the best of it. And let people know about it so that if I had a hypo at work they’d know this wasn’t what I’d call the ‘real’ me.

    You have a cause to pin yesterday’s event on. Mistakes happen. And you’ve already proved you’re good - wow, a First in History! What was your specialist area? I bet there were characters there who weren’t physical superheroes but more than coped with the ‘real’ world. How many Heads of State have there been with disabilities (it’s still early in the morning and I can think of two and a half - the half is the Russian one with alcoholism).

    In the ‘real’ world T1 is recognised as a disability in the Equality Act in the UK and reasonable accommodation must be made. That’s not to say you need to feel disabled; we can do just about everything anyone else can, we just do it with a metaphorical naughty parrot sitting one shoulder.
     
  9. leking

    leking Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Sometines it's hard to understand of you feeling horrible is down to diabetes or its just something that everyone feels.

    Being a T1 for 20 years, I have days where I feel like I'm in a trance. My wife is not T1, but she also complains of days like this too.

    I am definitely guilty of blaming diabetes everytime I have an off day, but when I take a step back I know it probably has little to do with it usually.
     
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  10. Fatima_94

    Fatima_94 Type 1 · Member

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    Thank you all so much for your taking the time to reply to my post, it really means a lot to me to hear from people who can relate and understand (especially as I feel uncomfortable repeatedly saying these things to friends who might not understand). I’m feeling much better today and hope to cope better in the future with down days, thanks again!:)
     
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  11. Fairygodmother

    Fairygodmother Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Just try to remember that the down days don’t last! Not always easy to do if your blood sugars have gone awol, I know, but this experience will stand you in good stead - got to get something positive out of it!

    All power to you now! Hope you have lots and lots of good days ahead.
     
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  12. slayer

    slayer Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi Fatima,

    I have been diabetic since the age of 13 and I am 35 now. My diabetes never got in the way of me leading a normal life even throughout uni - probably because I was spending so much time having high blood sugars! However, now that I have been trying for a baby, my blood sugars are tested regularly, I take my Novorapid and Lantus on time and correct when necessary. I spend most of my life between hypoing and going high to 18. I just can't seem to get it right and I know exactly how you feel.

    The advice that I would like to give to you is that every time you battle a hypo or illness, have the faith and the confidence in yourself to know that you are a fighter. You are brave. You are extraoridanary. You have a super power!

    Always appreciate life and be grateful for it, for life is precious and we are so fortunate to have the internet to help us on our diabetes journey as well as a wealth of information. I am grateful that I am trying to do everything I can to manage my condition and grateful that I realised the dangers of it.

    Be kind to yourself whether that is by painting your nails, going shoppjng, eating chocolate or having a day off from avoiding certain foods or thinking about your diabetes.

    Just remember, you are never alone and hope and pray for a cure. I am certain that the cure for diabetes is fast approaching.
     
  13. Fatima_94

    Fatima_94 Type 1 · Member

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    This really made me feel better. I hope you have better days ahead with your sugars! God bless and thank you ❤️
     
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  14. TheBigNewt

    TheBigNewt Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Yeah getting low can make you feel like a worthless POS sometimes. Makes me wish I had a freaking carton of vanilla ice cream in the freezer with some chocolate sauce to pour on it like the old days. No stinking bowls for me, no sir!
     
    • Hug Hug x 1
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