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Tractional Retinal Detachment

Discussion in 'Diabetes Complications' started by Dweller, May 13, 2018.

  1. Dweller

    Dweller Type 1 · Active Member

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    So I’ve been told in my most recent appointment that my retina is starting to detach in two places and it’s because of the amount of retinal traction in my eye at the minute. Has anyone here had the Vitrectomy for tractional retina detachment and come out the other side? I’ve read it’s a lot more complicated than a normal Vitrectomy. Yep. I’m that unlucky. My vision is incredibly stringy in that eye and can see lightning strikes/flashes where I’ve had yet another huge bleed two weeks ago. Went in for an emergency appointment and the doc said there was nothing they could do for the light flashes as it’s the effects of the laser? So have I got them for life?
     
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  2. Biggles2

    Biggles2 · Well-Known Member

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    @Dweller I will tag @Dark Horse for you. He is a font of information on retinal and other eye complications.
     
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  3. Dark Horse

    Dark Horse · Well-Known Member

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    The treatment offered depends on your individual case but there's useful information about treatment for retinal detachment here:-
    https://www.guysandstthomas.nhs.uk/resources/patient-information/eye/vitrectomy.pdf
    https://www.rcophth.ac.uk/wp-conten...NIB-Understanding-retinal-detachment-2013.pdf

    To reduce the risk of complications it's important to keep blood glucose levels under control (to minimise risk of infection) and follow any instructions your ophthalmologist gives you - if you're unclear about anything, ask for further explanation.
     
  4. Dweller

    Dweller Type 1 · Active Member

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    Thanks for the links. So tractional retina detachment is just like any normal detachment that occurs? The way my doc was speaking he was repeatedly saying about the high risks of failure and losing my sight altogether if anything went wrong. :/
     
  5. DCUKMod

    DCUKMod I reversed my Type 2 · Master
    Staff Member Administrator

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    Dweller - I'm not in a position to comment or any aspect of your treatment of it, but ine comment I will make is that when we are listening to scary things (such as your recent appointment) we tend to remember and amplify in our minds the really scary stuff.

    These days, the medics have to be so careful to ensure they have explained the risks as well as the benefits of any procedure. Our minds can tend to skip over the good bits, on the basis that that's what it's all about. You know that bit, but focus on "the tricky procedure", potential bleeading, pain and all that stuff they go through.

    Please don't think for an instant I am trivualising anything at all, as our sight is clearly very precious indeed, and we'd want to hang onto that with both hands.

    Good luck with it all. Hopefully @Dark Horse might drop in again and address the question you asked in your last post.
     
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  6. Alison54321

    Alison54321 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hope it all goes well, Dweller.
     
  7. Dark Horse

    Dark Horse · Well-Known Member

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    Your ophthalmologist knows the details of your case so is the person best placed to assess the risks involved. As @DCUKMod says, the medical staff are obliged to explain all the risks before having any procedure and when we hear them it's natural for us to focus on all the negative possibilities, even if they are much less likely than a positive outcome. However, if the ophthalmologists are recommending vitrectomy it's generally because they think the risks of not having surgery outweigh the risks of having surgery.

    Don't be afraid to ask your ophthalmologist to talk you through the risks of no treatment and how they compare to the risks of treatment. Although it's a worrying time, the ophthalmology team will undoubtedly do their very best for you. Good luck.
     
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