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Triglyceride >565 mmol/L

Discussion in 'Diabetes Discussions' started by ardneham, Mar 14, 2018.

  1. ardneham

    ardneham Prediabetes · Member

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    As my wife had a blood test recently and resulted in the above. Prompted to research on this and our habit of eating fruits
    regularly I came across this shocking news:
    https://paleoleap.com/10-reasons-why-fructose-is-bad/
    We have decided to drop all fruit-eating habits by 100%. I gratefully seek the experience of others in this regard via the
    Forum. Thanks
     
  2. Guzzler

    Guzzler Type 2 · Master

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    Those of us who have Pre Diabetes/Type 2 Diabetes should limit fruit intake in my opinion. I rarely eat fruit these days and eat only strawberries, blackberries and raspberries in very small quantities mixed with double cream or greek yoghurt and only after a low carb meal. Fructose travels almost directly to the liver where it is stored as fat. It can be noted here that there are no vitamins/minerals in fruits that cannot be had from vegetables which are metabolised in a different pathway.
     
  3. TheBigNewt

    TheBigNewt Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    You had better have made a huge mistake in your units of measurement here @ardneham. I trust you meant trigs were 565 mg/dl not mmol/L. Because if they were 565 mmol/L I don't think you'd be with us anymore lol. But a 565mg/dl,US units, (6.4mmol/l UK units) is high but not astronomically high. I see some people with trigs of 1500-2000. They have an enzyme deficiency they are born with (lipoprotein lipase) that causes theirs and it's treated with drugs specific for trigs like gemfibrozil or fenofibrate or even high dose slow release niacin. Not statins. Your intermediate elevation is probably not from eating too much fruit either. You most likely have had this for awhile and people with this degree of elevation don't get the dreaded disease that the untreated lipoprotein lipase deficiency people get: PANCREATITIS. Which is bad news bears. You might just have a mild lipolipase deficiency. That's my trigs lecture for today. Your bill's in the mail!
     
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    #3 TheBigNewt, Mar 14, 2018 at 9:16 PM
    Last edited: Mar 14, 2018
  4. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 (in remission!) · Legend

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    I have no idea what those trigs convert to in UK units (I see you are in Switzerland), but the best way to reduce trigs is to reduce carbohydrate. Reducing carbs will also help to increase HDL, the good cholesterol.

    Ideal triglycerides in UK units are below 1.9mmol/l

    Fruit is not good for those with T2 diabetes or pre-diabetes because the fructose they contain goes straight to the liver and is a major culprit in fatty livers, which is exactly what we do not need if we are to control our blood glucose levels. The fruits with the least fructose are raspberries and strawberries.
     
  5. Alexandra100

    Alexandra100 Prefer not to say · Well-Known Member

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    I read the article you linked to with interest, but my personal experience causes me to doubt if all the arguments presented there are correct. For much of my adult life I ate a form of Mediterranean diet, but heavily weighted towards fruit, which I love and found extremely convenient. I considered it a healthy form of fast food. Recently I discovered that I have a problem with raised blood sugar and I am convinced that Bluetit is correct in saying that we diabetics need to give up most forms of fruit, which I have done (not without regrets). Giving up fruit and other high carb options has somewhat lowered my blood glucose, but has done nothing to lower my triglycerides, which were already vanishingly low during all the years I was eating lots of fruit, and now that I am eating almost no fruit are slightly higher, though still well below the targets set. So I am not convinced that fruit and carbs in general are responsible for your wife's high triglycerides.

    I see in the article that it is claimed that when we eat fruit it cannot be used for energy but is stored as fat. I find this hard to believe, both because I became very thin while I was still eating lots of fruit, and because fruit is very generally eaten by runners and other sportspeople precisely to give them energy. If it could not do this, I think they would have noticed. My conclusion, for what it is worth, is that your wife could certainly lower her blood glucose levels by giving up fruit, and also by limiting other high carb foods. Whether that will lower her triglycerides is more doubtful, but it is worth experimenting.
     
  6. mountaintom

    mountaintom Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Sorry to jump in on this...am I correct in thinking you’re suggesting that high genetic trigs can cause Pancreatitis? Upon hospitalisation in January, and ultimately my diagnosis of T1D, I received Trig reading of 12 and prescribed statins.
     
  7. Guzzler

    Guzzler Type 2 · Master

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    There are plenty of examples of world class endurance athletes who follow low carb or ketgenic lifestyles.
    The sports people who carb up on fruit tend to be none Diabetic. Prof. Tim Noakes is the fella to see about sports science re diet imo.
     
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  8. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 (in remission!) · Legend

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    You may like to read this NICE document, from half way down, headed Lipid Measurement and Referral.
    https://www.nice.org.uk/guidance/cg...d-assessing-cardiovascular-disease-cvd-risk-2
     
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  9. TheBigNewt

    TheBigNewt Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    And how did they respond to the statin? Remember you were diagnosed with an untreated serious disease, Type 1 diabetes, presumably you were in DKA. So that's different. But people with lipoprotein lipase deficiency are prone to Trigs of at least 12, and to pancreatitis if it's not brought down. And statins are not the drugs of choice.
     
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  10. Alexandra100

    Alexandra100 Prefer not to say · Well-Known Member

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    I didn't say that athletes SHOULD carb up on fruit, but the fact that traditionally many have done so, and still do, suggests that it is incorrect to say carbs cannot be used for energy, only stored as fat.
     
  11. Guzzler

    Guzzler Type 2 · Master

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    I am unaware that anyone has said that carbs cannot be used as energy, that would just be plain wrong. No, what some of us know is that Fructose, for those with Pre Diabetes or Type 2 Diabetes, is best limited or cut out because of fatty liver and its concommitant IR. Fructose is a funny ol' sugar and it is metabolised slightly differently than other carbs. As you are aware, visceral fat is as damaging as subcutaneous fat and just because a person shows no outward signs of fat storage does not mean that fat isn't being stored viscerally.

    A short video by Fettker. The relevant part starts at about 11 minutes but the whole presentation is a good one.

     
    #11 Guzzler, Mar 15, 2018 at 1:33 AM
    Last edited: Mar 15, 2018
  12. mountaintom

    mountaintom Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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  13. mountaintom

    mountaintom Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I was told I was very lucky but not officially DKA.
    I’ve not had bloods done since but expect to have them checked in April before I go see the diabetic doctor.
     
  14. mountaintom

    mountaintom Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Is it worth me digging out my lab report?
     
  15. ardneham

    ardneham Prediabetes · Member

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