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Type 1 diabetes

Discussion in 'Type 1 Diabetes' started by selfie_king1990, Mar 25, 2018.

  1. Chowie

    Chowie Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I think it's very weird is that you are only happy when you are trying to make everyone else here feel miserable.
    Out of your 305 posts please show me one positive post!
     
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  2. NoKindOfSusie

    NoKindOfSusie Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    It's not exactly a very positive subject is it.
     
  3. Grant_Vicat

    Grant_Vicat Don't have diabetes · Well-Known Member

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    When you start looking at the broader picture, regardless of ailments imposed on us, what can anyone describe as a "normal" life?
    A normal life is a Utopian dream, and probably unfulfilling at that. R. D. Lawrence (1892-1968) developed diabetes in 1920, and was amongst the first to be treated with Insulin. He lived a very fulfilled life, even injecting himself through the trouser leg at parties and dances, with a glass syringe! He also made it possible for Type 1s to live longer as a result of his research over many years. To live till 76 in those days was an incredible achievement with a condition that was only fractionally understood in comparison with now. His attitude says it all.
     
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    #43 Grant_Vicat, Mar 26, 2018 at 9:31 PM
    Last edited: Mar 26, 2018
  4. Jc3131

    Jc3131 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I was diagnosed June 2017 aged 42.

    With the help of my stuttering pancreas, change of diet and surprisingly for me, a strong will I have managed to get my levels within a decent range. This is not to say I've conquered it as I have quite a few random readings over 12mmol.

    Also I have to add that even though I'm a 'tough' northern bloke (well sort of) I am quite scared of when the day comes that I'm totally insulin dependant and my insulin intake increases.

    Life goes on and if I don't look after myself then life won't go on so this is my driving force. I need to stay quite fit for my families sake as I need to provide for them etc.

    One good thing to come out of it all is that I have lost my love handles and man boobs and I look quite lean and mean ish.
     
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  5. Fairygodmother

    Fairygodmother Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I’ve just been to see ‘The Shape of Water’ with a good friend, and for the whole of the evening the only times T1 butted into focus was a bolus for pre-film food and getting out the Levemir to basal in the dark before the film was ended. A really great film! A really good evening!
     
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  6. Robinredbreast

    Robinredbreast Type 1 · Oracle

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    Shi*e happens. My Ex left me and our two children I became ill with suspected Colitis, then I was diagnosed hundred's of miles away from my home with Type 1, in a hospital up North, whilst my ex and the girlfriend ( wife for years now) had them for a week in a caravan beside the sea. So, the moral of this story is, don't look back in anger, move on and find some peace with yourself and your diagnosis. I have had so much upset and horrible times in my life, but unlike you, I will keep fighting on and WILL NOT let this condition burden me or drag me down. The only plus side to my diagnosis back then was, he had to have our children for an extra week ( it was just going to be the two of them)

    ps my 2 1/2 year old granddaughter was diagnosed with type 1, she is 9 now and is doing okay,
     
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  7. yingtong

    yingtong Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    February 1962.
     
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  8. Deleted Account

    Deleted Account · Guest

    That's an interesting thought and I think I know where you are coming from,

    I was diagnosed in my mid-30s.

    Some days, when I remember how things used to be without diabetes, I wish I didn't have anything to compare it with.

    Some days, when things are not going well, I am incredibly glad that I did not have to go through my teens, exams, university, ... with diabetes.

    But overall, I think I am glad that I have not had as long to build up complications/go through a rebellious period, was diagnosed when we had insulin pens rather than syringes and was mature enough to understand what diabetes is and make my own decisions upon diagnosis.
     
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  9. Deleted Account

    Deleted Account · Guest

    I guess you have to support Sunderland :)

    (I have to say that: my partner is a Geordie!)
     
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  10. isjoberg

    isjoberg Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Ah see as a teen I used to wish I had a memory of not having to inject / take my bg / account for my diabetes because that's never been an option for me. I realise for a lot of people it's sad to remember maybe how things were, but I was sad because I will never experience being non-diabetic. Have kind of accepted that now !
     
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  11. NoKindOfSusie

    NoKindOfSusie Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Personally I'd rather not have any knowledge of what it's like to have to do all those things, but oh well.
     
  12. annliggins

    annliggins Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I do just "alright" , most days 7 -10 are ok nights are ok as well hey ho some dumps at 16 and i dont get the bolus right 5/10 .. I'm not perfect but I do as best I can whilst living a good life. If I survive this something else will get me !! Control it as well as you can , don't be hard on yourself you're gonna fook it up everyotherday or so..so fooking what dont panic just keep trying
     
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  13. Bertyboy

    Bertyboy Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I was diagnosed in November (just shy of hitting 40), so I'm still a noobie. I had just put it down to falling apart as I get old and lifestyle, so wasn't that bothered or surprised. I've soon adjusted to the insulin therapy and no carb thing and I do feel a lot better than I did before I got diagnosed, so I'm glad I did.
     
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