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what 2eat an what not 2 eat?

Discussion in 'Low Calorie Diets' started by laurenk978, Nov 4, 2012.

  1. laurenk978

    laurenk978 · Active Member

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    Hi my name is Lauren an only got diagnosed with type1 3days ago now! iam on Lantus solostar and novo rapid. i inject 4times a day!
    I would say b4 my diagnosis i had a fairly ok diet! and im not overweight for my height! as like every1 else i like my weekend takeaway treats and odd bar of chocolate!
    i did drink full fat fizzy drinks that i hav now changed 2 diet an no added sugar drinks and also have went from using normal sugar 2 half spoon! (obv wil aventually hav no sugar but taking baby steps)
    as far as iam aware i have been told 2 hav carbs with every meal?? this confuses me as wen im on here i hear ppl r on low-carb diet? my BS is stil very high but this is 2b expected and ketones r slowly but surely coming dwn.

    has any1 got any advice? :roll:

    Lauren x
     
  2. MaryJ

    MaryJ · Well-Known Member

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    Hi Lauren

    Welcome to the forum

    Have a read through Daisy's post in the greetings section.

    With you having insulin you count the carbs and have the medication to match. Some people find this absolutely fine as it doesnt affect their way of life too much (from a food point of view). Others would rather have less carbs and therefore less meds as they prefer to minimise the amount of meds in their body and also insulin can put weight on.

    It's a personal choice with no right or wrong answer, just what suits you

    Mary x
     
  3. laurenk978

    laurenk978 · Active Member

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    Thanks 4the advice Mary! X
     
  4. xyzzy

    xyzzy Other · Well-Known Member

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    Hi Lauren and welcome.

    You mention your levels are still high on your insulin regime. Try asking for advice about that on the T1 section of the forum. Tucked away here your questions may not have been spotted. I'm not on insulin so can't really help.
     
  5. phoenix

    phoenix Type 1 · Expert

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    As you have only been diagnosed for a few days your doses of insulin will be very much determined by your doctor/nurse and they may need to change them quite a bit at first. The rapid insulin doses than they have prescribed you will be prescribed under the assumption that you are eating a normal healthy diet including some starchy carbohydrates.

    It is a very good idea to learn to count the carbohydrates in your meals and to keep a diary of your meals, carb counts, blood glucose levels before and 2 hours after meals. Armed with this information you will begin to realise the effect of your rapid insulin, eventually learn how to adjust your insulin to the meals you eat. ( there are courses both online and in person)
    The tools you need for that are a little book with a list of foods and the carbohydrate they contain (the best ones in my opinion list the carbohydrate per 100g rather than odd portion sizes) and some scales. An alternative which could be helpful at first is a little book called carbs and cals which had photos of a wide variety of foods/ meals of differing portion sizes along with their carb counts. http://www.carbsandcals.com/ Remember that there are carbohydrates in veggies/fruits /dairy as well as starches.


    I try to eat a lot of vegetables, some fruit, protein from meat and fish; I eat a lot of chicken and try to eat fish at least twice a week. I don't often eat dessert (fruit is better) and when I took sugar used sweetener in drinks rather than sugar. When I first developed T1, my dietitian told me to divide the plate into quarters ,a quarter protein, quarter starchy carbs and half the plate veggies. With a piece of fruit or some stawberries/blueberries plus if you don't drink milk some yoghurt or a small piece of cheese you have a balanced meal (bit more difficult with things like stir fries but it suggests the relative proportions.

    I personally tend to choose starchy carbs that have a lower glycemic index ie brown basmati rice/ boiled new potatoes, al dente brown pasta; I would avoid most breakfast cereals as they I often very high in sugar (I eat porridge with a few berries most mornings) . It is difficult to find lower GI breads in the UK. A lot of people eat Burgen but also find some of the very grainy breads taste good and are lower GI. Pulses are a good low GI starch.
    http://www.glycemicindex.com/
    (basic info in the FAQs, the newsletter has a lot of interesting info each month and some recipes.

    This basic pattern is what I still do seven years later. I've learned to adapt it and to adjust my dose age so that I can eat a dessert when I go out to dinner or adjust my insulin if I go to a friends house and am presented with a big bowl of pasta. I just don't do it every day. Take aways can be difficult to give the appropriate insulin for(carbs and cals book can help here). The big problem is that the sauces offered by Indian and Chinese restaurants are very varied and some are very high in sugar. It probably gets easier; I live in France so don't get much practice.

    I also find exercise is an important part of my diabetes 'tool box' (I know you asked about food but I think it's equally important)
    This sort of approach to diabetes control has worked for me and I 've managed to keep very good blood glucose control .
    Yes I put on some weight when I first went onto insulin because I had lost so much before diagnosis. I now just keep an eye on things, if I have been eating a bit too much or exercising a bit too little and put on weight, I cut back a bit. I
     
  6. smidge

    smidge LADA · Well-Known Member

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    Hi Lauren and welcome!

    I have a slow-onset form of Type 1 called LADA. At diagnosis, I also got the advice to eat plenty of starchy carbs - i have ignored that advice and gone for a low-carb diet. All carb turns to glucose in your blood and you have to inject enough insulin at the right times to cover this. Injecting insulin can never be as precise as your own body would produce, so there is plenty of scope for getting it wrong and having too high or too low blood glucose. This is the key reason why I restrict my carbs. However, I believe there are several benefits to low-carbing for Type 1s, some of which are:

    1. Lower carb = less injected insulin
    2. Less injected insulin = smaller mistakes
    3. Less carb and less injected insulin means smaller swings of blood glucose - more stable
    4. More carb = more insulin = weight gain
    5. Weight gain = insulin resistance = more insulin = weight gain

    I keep my carb intake to around 50g (or less) a day, and never more than 25g carb in a single meal. In the three years I have had diabetes, this has kept my HbA1c to around 5.9% with no serious hypos. I take only smaller doses of insulin (8 units a day basal, split morning and night and around 1:8 bolus to carb ratio). This keeps my BG as stable as LADA can be (it is a particularly spikey condition). I still get spikes I would rather not have at times, and I am working on that!

    Anyway, I know this approach doesn't suit everyone, but you will get plenty of advice on eating lots of starch as a Type 1 and on matching insulin doses to 'normal eating'. It's early days for you yet and you need to discover what works best for you. I just wanted to show you that there is an alternative approach.

    All the best

    Smidge
     
  7. noblehead

    noblehead Type 1 · Guru
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    Hi Lauren,

    Phoenix has said almost everything I would have said and don't have much more to add, however the term low-carb has been lost in translation and some people consider I eat low-carb even though I eat 150g of carbs a day over 3 meals, almost all type 1's eat some carbs with their meals although there are a few who choose to follow a Bernstein style diet of 30g or below a day, once you've established good control and been on insulin for a few months (and hopefully been on a carb counting course) you can then decide on the amount of carbohydrates you have with each meal.

    The best advice when newly diagnosed is to keep in close contact with your diabetes team, keep a diary of your blood glucose readings, food and exercise etc so they can advise you on insulin adjustments and before you know it it will all fall into place, good luck!!!
     
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