1. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android.
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Guest, we'd love to know what you think about the forum! Take the Diabetes Forum Survey 2021 »
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Diabetes Forum should not be used in an emergency and does not replace your healthcare professional relationship. Posts can be seen by the public.
    Dismiss Notice
  4. Guest, stay home, stay safe, save the NHS. Stay up to date with information about keeping yourself and people around you safe here and GOV.UK: Coronavirus (COVID-19). Think you have symptoms? NHS 111 service is available here.
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community »

Worried parent ...please help!

Discussion in 'Insulin Pump Forum' started by anxious parent, Jul 6, 2016.

  1. Tanny35

    Tanny35 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    136
    Likes Received:
    231
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Hi @anxious parent

    You have already had so much sound advice in comments above.
    All to which I would agree with.
    Hormones around the ages of 10 onwards play havoc in diabetics lives.
    I was diabetic from the age of 5 - and as stated before, your daughter may also be snacking and not telling you. I think as a child with D we have all done it. So it is most probs a mixture of hormones / growth spurt, and maybe the odd sneaky snack.

    As suggested above, I would book In to speak with her DSN and not the doctor.unless of course it's a diabetic specialist doctor.

    As for the hypo and then highs, that could possibly have also been due to the liver dumping glucose after a hypo, I usually have a hypo, then my bloods can go a bit erratic and go high because of the liver dump - but then the liver wants to take it back which can then put u in another hypo.
    These are all things I learnt from my DSN over the years, and I know there's always new things to learn even after all these years.

    There are some really good people on this forum, some with many years of experience - and they're always happy to answer any questions.

    I really hope her bg starts to behave for you both.

    Tanya x


    Sent from my iPhone using DCUK Forum mobile app
     
    • Like Like x 6
  2. RuthW

    RuthW Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,158
    Likes Received:
    1,921
    Trophy Points:
    178
    I'm not saying it's terrible. I'm just giving you an idea of what a 'normal' adult is on. It is true that adolescents tend to use more insulin and then less when they stop growing. I am not sure exactly how much your daughter should be on. Her DN may be able to tell you if it's in the normal range for her age. But yes, it's a fair bit. Consider everything but don't panic. It's obviously not 'sneak eating' and that's good because it makes things quite unmanageable. I'm sure you'll crack it eventually. Or it will simply settle down again.


    Sent from my iPhone using DCUK Forum mobile app
     
    • Like Like x 2
  3. anxious parent

    anxious parent Parent · Member

    Messages:
    24
    Likes Received:
    20
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Hi Tanya,

    Thank you so much for that input!!!...forums and people like you make it easier for us to live with condition. Last night was not too good....but yesterday was much better so we are slowly getting there,,,,I will get in touch with her DSN and lets see how things go :)
     
    • Like Like x 2
  4. anxious parent

    anxious parent Parent · Member

    Messages:
    24
    Likes Received:
    20
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Thanks Ruth !!!
     
  5. RuthW

    RuthW Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,158
    Likes Received:
    1,921
    Trophy Points:
    178
    Hi again! It occurred to me today that a sudden rise in insulin requirements can sometimes occur because of a rise in insulin resistance. This happened to me a couple of weeks ago. I was a bit busy and uninterested in cooking for myself so I made a big pot of an olive oil dish (green beans, a Turkish dish) and included it in my dinner three evenings on the trot. There followed three days of rising levels till I started wondering if my insulin was "off" or my pump wasn't working and I was on the balcony at midnight on my exercise bike trying to work my blood sugar down. That did have some effect. And I managed to get a grip again. But I won't be eating the same dish more than once a week in future!

    So, maybe the actual components of your diet and their proportions might be doing it? If your daughter is now on Summer holiday (like the UK) both her levels of activity and the components her diet may have changed. Not necessarily the carb intake. Like me, if her fats intake goes up, it may show up as IR. It is amazing how much effect that can have.

    Fortunately, for T1s theses bouts of insulin resistance are usually temporary if we take steps to counteract them.

    Anyway, just another suggestion from my own experience.


    Sent from my iPhone using DCUK Forum mobile app
     
  6. anxious parent

    anxious parent Parent · Member

    Messages:
    24
    Likes Received:
    20
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Hi Ruth,

    It's quite a coincidence that you came up with this as I've been reading up on insulin resistance .....now that you've brought this up, this whole thing started after her school activity trip for a week....from the time she got back her her sugars have gone haywire...on one side it was an activity trip but on the other side, I think she had high carb meals there...we are in the UK but her schools are yet to close...so I'm wondering if she developed a bit of IR during her trip...Gosh ! sometimes I feel overwhelmed by the whole thing...there's just so many angles to consider...but I guess its important to keep faith and persevere....:)
     
  7. RuthW

    RuthW Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,158
    Likes Received:
    1,921
    Trophy Points:
    178
    Oh , if she's been under someone else's care for a while, that's the simplest explanation. Probably, she'll get back to normal over the next week or so. It's really annoying, though, that the relevant factor only ever becomes clear in retrospect! Still, it's helpful the next time.


    Sent from my iPhone using DCUK Forum mobile app
     
    • Like Like x 2
  • Meet the Community

    Find support, connect with others, ask questions and share your experiences with people with diabetes, their carers and family.

    Did you know: 7 out of 10 people improve their understanding of diabetes within 6 months of being a Diabetes Forum member. Get the Diabetes Forum App and stay connected on iOS and Android

    Grab the app!
  • Tweet with us

  • Like us on Facebook