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Weekend exercise warriors

Discussion in 'Diabetes Soapbox - Have Your Say' started by ickihun, Nov 4, 2017.

  1. ickihun

    ickihun Type 2 · Expert

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  2. Guzzler

    Guzzler Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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  3. ickihun

    ickihun Type 2 · Expert

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    Fit in my 40s
    Fit in my 40s: sedentary day job + stupid attitude = weekend warrior injuries


    I’m struggling to bounce back from my first ever sporting injury – and learning that I’m not alone



    [​IMG]

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    Zoe Williams


    @zoesqwilliams
    Saturday 4 November 2017 07.00 GMT

    It’s the first sporting injury of my life, sustained while I was training for a longer out-of-town cycle with BellaVelo. Another cyclist wearing tracksuit bottoms (this is relevant) undertook me, and his pocket hooked on to my drop handlebars. I didn’t realise – I just thought, well that’s bad luck, to lose control of your steering at the exact same time as the guy in front pulls his trousers down – and wham, the next thing I knew, my shoulder hit the pavement. The thing after that, I had one useless arm.

    Guardian Weekend Live

    A week later, I couldn’t lift a pint. I want to say something bolstering about recovery in your 40s, something that makes the human body sound mysterious and adaptive, but the phrase I’m looking for is “not as good”. Everything that goes wrong is wronger, and righting it is slower. “Around your late 30s, you’ve peaked, and recovery will get slower,” osteopath Hashim Saifuddinexplains. “Your heart and lung capacity are decreasing, very slowly, which reduces your output.” Plus your inter-vertebral discs don’t rehydrate so well, so all the shock they would have absorbed goes into your bones instead.


    The sports injury specialist Paul Argent is a bit more brutal. “Past 28, we’re in a battle. People always think, if you smash yourself, you’ll adapt; the harder you go, the better the outcome. That is not the case. The harder you go, the worse the outcome. It’s not sexy, but it’s the truth.”

    They’re called “weekend warrior injuries”. You don’t need a bike – all you need is a sedentary day job and a stupid attitude. The injuries Rachael, a physio, sees are from cross fit, running and rowing, but it’s not the activity so much as the intensity. “Injuries in this age group are all about people training too quickly, doing things their bodies aren’t ready for.”

    Fit in my 40s: ‘Give up this fitness tracker? I’ll die first’

    People think training for a marathon means doing something that’s a bit like a marathon, but Paul says, “that’s like, instead of working on a car to get it ready for a race, you’re just driving it”. You have to build your strength, and that is a slower and deeper job than just pushing yourself. And warm-ups are of limited use. “Sitting at a computer, that’s a very cold state,” Hashim says. “High-intensity exercise is a very hot state. A warm-up isn’t really going to take you from one place to another.” You have to consider the contrast between your regular day and your exercise, and not make it too great.


    Surely people who do too much are healthier than people who do nothing? “Yes and no,” Hashim says. “People who do nothing will have cardiovascular problems. People who do too much will have muscular-skeletal problems. But internally, their bodily systems will be healthier.” But what does “healthy” mean? According to Paul, “it’s being able to do what you need to do painlessly, sleep well and feel good when you wake up.”

    This week I learned
    Six weeks is the catch-all healing time for muscle tears and sprains and suchlike. But there’s no guarantee you’ll actually be better then.

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    © 2017 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved.[/QUOTE]
     
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  4. Polgara

    Polgara Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    This is why I've made a very conscious decision to keep walking - and not move onto running. I had rubbish knees when I was a teenager - they are far less trouble these days (I'm 46) and I don't want to damage them again. I've seen too many friends who are runners get an injury - and then they can't do anything for weeks on end - some have needed an op and more recovery time after that. I'd rather just keep going every day.
     
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  5. Guzzler

    Guzzler Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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  6. ickihun

    ickihun Type 2 · Expert

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    I was asked through the week if I am a all or nothing kind of person.
    I guess I am.
    Still frustrated with immobility, always will be.
     
  7. Guzzler

    Guzzler Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    The frustration remains but it does get easier to accept as time goes on. One of the things I most miss is just being able to put my coat on and leave the house at a moments notice. That choice has been taken away and when choices are curtailed that really does impact on quality of life. Hope your condition/s ease, fingers crossed.
     
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  8. ickihun

    ickihun Type 2 · Expert

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    I get told all the time that back problems can just fix themselves. After nearly 3yrs of it, my patience is running out.
    And I've lost 4stones but only a tiny help. I'm lighter now than when child bearing and before I started on insulin.
    Weight loss doesn't seem to be the whole solution.

    Nor heavy unprepared exercise eh?
     
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  9. Brunneria

    Brunneria Other · Moderator
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    I have a great friend who is exactly 5 years younger than me.
    We joke about our various aches and pains working to a schedule - and his schedule is 5 yrs behind mine.

    When i was a kid, post exercise muscle 'stiffness' turned up after around 20 hours, and stayed for about a day.
    Now i get pain the same day, worse over days 2-3 and then it starts to ease.
    Tendons take 2-3 months now.

    It is all rather tiresome.
    I see young people zipping about with disturbing enthusiasm, injuring themselves with a belief in their own indestructability (runner's knees, tennis elbows, pushing through the pain, ignoring back twinges, training before adequate recovery...) and i flinch. Been there, done that. And now all those injuries have come back to haunt me. Permanently. I can trace my calf twinges to that terrible pulled muscle I had in my 20s, and my shoulder to the competitive swimming in my teens, and my back to the lifting I did during my first ever Saturday job.

    Sorry if that is depressing, but don't worry - if someone had warned me all those years ago, i would have ignored them too. :) we all think we are immortal when we are young.
     
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  10. ickihun

    ickihun Type 2 · Expert

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    Not depressing but this thread may help someone. You never know.
    We can let them make their own minds up.

    Many told me jogging not right exercise for my weight but swimming just relaxed my spine so much it went bang, I feel.
    I don't think swimming helped my core, for sure.
    I used to do a lot of stretching in the pool but temperature was too cold, still is, for me.
     
  11. Guzzler

    Guzzler Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    It is not only excercise, though. I tore my rotator cuff ligament just by reaching behind me to get something. As we age our bodies just can't compensate like they used to. I beleive athletes such as tennis players and golfers suffer rotator cuff injuries all the time but because they are usually fit and young they recover quickly. An injury of the same like after the age of fifty is said to never heal. Sigh...

    Arn't we a cheery bunch this morning? ;)
     
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