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“Spikes” and Recovery

Discussion in 'Ask A Question' started by Mike97, Jan 14, 2020.

  1. Mike97

    Mike97 · Member

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    I know that Weetabix is high in carbs and that carbs will increase my BG levels. But is it in any way acceptable to accept such”Spikes” if BG quickly recovers e.g. before Weetabix BG 6.0, spike to 10.2, but 2 hours after Weetabix back to 6.1. I am Type 2.
     
  2. xfieldok

    xfieldok Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Depends upon whether you want to control your BG or not.
     
  3. novorapidboi26

    novorapidboi26 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Depends on what your health needs are.....

    Personally as a type one I would be happy with that spike.....although single figures are preferred....

    if you observe this spike for only a short period then damage is unlikely.....but if you want to eliminate it then medication adjustment/or introduction is needed, that or stop having weetabix...
     
  4. Mike97

    Mike97 · Member

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    Thank you novorapidboi. Just the sort of response I was hoping for.
     
  5. JohnEGreen

    JohnEGreen Other · Master

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    And what if the spike was 12 or 13 or maybe 20 but still dropped in the two hours would that still be acceptable?
     
  6. Hotpepper20000

    Hotpepper20000 · Well-Known Member

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    As I understand it, that the more my BG spikes as someone with type 2 and insulin resistance, this continues to encourage too much insulin in my body.
     
  7. JohnEGreen

    JohnEGreen Other · Master

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    "The term “glucotoxicity” refers to the detrimental effects of chronic exposure to supraphysiological glucose concentrations on the phenotype and function of β cells. The association of small increases in plasma glucose levels with dramatic loss of acute glucose-stimulated insulin secretion was first demonstrated in humans nearly 40 years ago.106 Since then, this finding has been confirmed in several animal models exposed to hyperglycemia including partially pancreatectomized,107 glucose-infused108 and neonatal diabetic rats,109 and in vitro cultured islets.110,111 Insulin secretion is considered to be the first function compromised by chronic high glucose levels in β cells. Yet, hyperglycemia has also been shown to lead to depletion of insulin stores together with decreased insulin gene expression."

    https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/medicine-and-dentistry/glucotoxicity

    Another effect of raised blood sugar is high blood pressure as the glucose effects the blood vessels making them contract more vigorously.

    I personally would not be complacent about spikes into the double figures even if reduced in the two hour period lack of damage may be assumed but is not certain I'd rather not take the chance if I don't need to especially not for a bowl of Weetabix.
     
    • Agree Agree x 3
  8. LittleGreyCat

    LittleGreyCat Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    You are within the general guidelines so not doing too badly IMHO.

    However on the principle of "any spike is a bad spike" you may improve your condition by not eating the Weetabix.

    If you have the money and can find one (recent tales of lack of availability) then a Freestyle Libre may be a wise investment, because it gives a much clearer picture of how high your spikes are going between tests, and more importantly what your body is doing over night.

    Personally, I would kill to be able to eat Weetabix and be back to 6.1 within 2 hours.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  9. Robbity

    Robbity Type 2 · Expert

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    When I started using a meter, I read an intriguing suggestion for measuring the impact of "spikes". Essentially you follow the pattern on a graph of your glucose levels with a piece of thread (you can usually do this by eye too) : if you have lots of ups and downs you get a much longer length than if you have a more stable less spikey graph - the idea being the shorter the thread the less likelihood of problems. Maybe not very scientific but it made a weird sort of sense to me as a novice!
     
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  10. slip

    slip Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Poor ol' @Mike97 has been a member of the forum for a month and he's already receiving death threats :hilarious:

    Now if Mike had followed the advice usually given out, test just before a meal and 2hrs after first bite, he'd be unaware of the spike to 10 - how many others are eating 'weetabix' and peaking before the 2hrs and then dropping to acceptable numbers - an interesting conundrum for which I have no answers but interested to know the views of others.
     
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  11. JohnEGreen

    JohnEGreen Other · Master

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    I normally test at an hour and then two hours I know most people don't find it necessary but it's just one of my quirks I like to know where I've been not just where I started out from and where I ended ended up.
     
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  12. Daphne917

    Daphne917 Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    Well done - that is almost the same reaction as a non diabetic.
     
  13. Brunneria

    Brunneria Other · Moderator
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    If my bg were fluctuating from 6 to 10 and back again within 2 hours, I would feel rough.
    If that happened every morning, it would affect my life significantly (energy levels, concentration, reaction times, mental clarity, work productivity and weekend ‘playtime’)
    If it was happening after other meals too... no thanks.

    So I avoid the carbs, have steady bgs after food, feel better and enjoy life more.
    YMMV, of course.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
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