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Acceptance

Discussion in 'Type 2 Diabetes' started by Dovey1971, Apr 18, 2014.

  1. Dovey1971

    Dovey1971 · Member

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    How do you accept Diabetes as a serious condition, when you feel normal?


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  2. Andy12345

    Andy12345 Type 2 · Expert

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    hi, welcome :)

    you read about it

    ignore it at your peril

    how many people died of bowel cancer that felt fine until it was too late?

    have a read of the forum but remember that the folks here are the ones smart enough to take it serious and look for advice on how to control it, the people that dont come here often live in ignorance, as the advice the docs often give out is deadly, so for every success story on here im sure there are 100 stories you wont read about that arent good

    best of luck
     
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  3. andcol

    andcol I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member
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    ummm... you may feel normal now but over time you will get worse and start to get many complications. There are many threads on here where people have got some problems; may be worth reading a few and hopefully that will give you someincentive
     
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  4. julifriend

    julifriend Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    You accept it as a serious condition when you decide you love your feet and eyes more than you love the food that's causes you BG levels to spike. Harsh it may be, but ultimately it's true. And at that point you accept that something has to change. For T1s that'll be the need to count carbs and inject insulin and for most T2s it'll be the need to stop eating foods that raise their BG levels and exercise more than they had been doing. For many diabetics it will also involve needing to lose weight by cutting the calories consumed.
     
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  5. Totto

    Totto Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    As Andy said, how to accept cancer is a serious condition before the severe symptoms set in?

    Badly controlled bg can cause cancer, dementia, blindness, kidney failure, amputations and generally low quality of life.

    http://www.phlaunt.com/diabetes/sp5index.php
     
  6. Dovey1971

    Dovey1971 · Member

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    All valid points and agree the evidence, I work in a environment that exposes me to complex cases but I don't monitor BG and always hit below 6, it doesn't feel real? Just wondered if anyone else felt this way?


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  7. Andy12345

    Andy12345 Type 2 · Expert

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    yes mate, denial is probly the most common emotion, i certainly felt it, lying in a hospital bed with a drip in, feeling 100% fine
     
  8. andcol

    andcol I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member
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    So what were your diagnostic numbers (HbA1c and fasting)? I do not quite understand what your last statement is actually trying to communicate
     
  9. ricardoharrison

    ricardoharrison Type 2 · Active Member

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    It's a hard one to accept. I got diagnosed about six weeks ago. I've cut my carbs, sugars, increased exercise and eating better than I have in years. I feel great. Have I come to terms that this is a condition I'll have for my life and it can potential have major complications??. Probably not. It feels like at the moment I'm working to a goal of becoming 'healthy'. Over the next few years that'll change as I become more aware that it's never really going to go away.

    I'm 32, it was a shock for me but I want to have kids with my wife, I want to grow old and live for another 50 odd years. Is a ****** diet now worth it for depraving me of my eyesight and feet?? not a feckin chance.

    This forum is ace, there's sooooo much advice and support make the most of it!!. This is a dangerous condition but it's not something that you should let define you. Take it by the ******** and make baby step changes and in no time you won't notice the major changes you've made in your life.

    My big thing for me was food, I was worried I'd be eating a boring diet but again this forum is great for recipes and ideas.

    plus with all my running I'm starting to develop a runners stomach ......... which my wife is liking, so there are perks !!!
     
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  10. Lizzy5172

    Lizzy5172 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    If you don't monitor bg how do you know it's below 6?
     
  11. Dovey1971

    Dovey1971 · Member

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    My highest Measurement has been 59mmol and not had any complications even though I don't monitor but don't want to wait till complications occur before I take action?


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  12. Dovey1971

    Dovey1971 · Member

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    Hi Lizzy, annual reviews?


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  13. poshtotty

    poshtotty Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi @Dovey1971

    I was diagnosed T2 in 2007 and challenged the diagnosis because I felt so well. I thought my rapid weight loss was great and sheer coincidence.

    For the first few months after diagnosis I referred to myself as diabetic and was very strict about what I ate and drank, following rigidly the guidance from the diabetic nurse and clinic and ensured I had 50% carbs with each meal. I was given urine testing strips which always read the same and didn't show any bs so I got over confident and slipped back to my old ways. I continued to eat ow fat and med-high carbs and exercised daily until I got a nasty shock in January when an operation I was waiting for was cancelled indefinitely because my bs were through the roof and I hadn't realised. I wasn't testing daily and had no monitor . For several years I'd mentioned to my GP, dn and hospital consultant that I was unhappy and puzzled about my sudden weight gain, but no-one suggested it could be my diabetes. All I knew was that I overnight I became ill. and couldn't understand why. I became lethargic, had brain fog, was tearful and fell asleep at different times throughout the day. Classic signs apparently.

    I've since learned that situations or traumas can trigger a deterioration in diabetes and I believe this was the case with me. A sudden death in the family and a stressful two years of family feuds and legal battles was my trigger and I'm now on medication, yet still unable to bring my fasting levels down to a healthy level.

    At my diabetic review last week, for the first time ever, I couldn't feel the vibrating instrument on my toes, although I could when the nurse tested it on my hand.

    My decline has been rapid and unexpected. I had felt well and in denial for 6.5 years until something triggered my diabetes and now I'm desperately trying to climb my way back up.

    Please - if you've been diagnosed, take it seriously and take action to control it and keep it at bay. Don't let it control you.

    Good luck and stay informed on this site where you will find encouragement, help and inspiration.
     
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  14. If you are newly diagnosed and finding it hard to accept due to a lack of symptoms, just take a leap of faith and behave like you have a serious condition. It can't do you any harm. As Ricardo's post above shows, the lifestyle of a well managed diabetic is healthier than many "normals" enjoy. You will grow to understand it the more you read so no hurry.
     
  15. Lizzy5172

    Lizzy5172 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    My hba1c was 5.6 which apparently 5.5 is classed as diabetic so I am over and want to be below that next blood test. I am treating my early diagnosis as a kick up the bum to make me take notice and do something positive to make a difference
     
  16. Your annual review will only tell you what your average bg has been for the past 3 months. If you monitor throughout each day, it might help you see how your body is handling carbohydrates.
     
  17. Totto

    Totto Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    No, you are perfectly right, bad idea to wait for complications. Have you got a meter? If not get one. If you can´t get one on prescription buy one with affordable strips and test, test and test. Only way so far as I can understand to see what makes bg go up is to test. And correct diet and exercise accordingly.
     
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  18. this is too difficult

    this is too difficult Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I sometimes feel I treat it as a game. I set targets and try to stick to them. But in reality it is because I am terrified and will do what ever is needed to stop losing my limbs and sight.
     
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  19. Totto

    Totto Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    That is called handling a serious disease. A brilliant way to cope.

    I remember when new at uni I played I was a university student even to myself to get the work done.
     
  20. this is too difficult

    this is too difficult Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    just did a test with the people in the room. I have many lance devices
    I was 5.8. everyone else was higher.
    I just ate a bit less than they did.
     
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