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Alternatives to weetabix??

Discussion in 'Parents' started by Lucy's mummy, Apr 12, 2013.

  1. 375lindyloo

    375lindyloo · Active Member

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    I have the Alpro that's like yogurt-three dessert spoons, shake of cinnamon, small amount almonds and walnuts and small amount of berries and am ok with levels. Also it's lovely!
    You will have to experiment with quantities.
     
  2. skipbifferty

    skipbifferty · Member

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    You could try Kellog's All Bran, it's quite high in carbs but is low-mid GI in my experience, especially with semi- or full-fat milk. Of course, you should always carb-count as well.
     
  3. Anonymous

    Anonymous · Guest

    From my very amateurish studies, Weetabix seems to be the best of a bad bunch. I flip between two Weetabix and plain oats (not Readybrek etc.), both with a banana or apple. I suspect a youngster would not be very enamoured with plain oats though.

    Perhaps you could try making your own meusli type of thing in bulk, so to speak e.g. That would have crushed nuts (no...lumbago as the joke goes), oats, & dried fruit etc. I know the dried fruit has concentrated sugars, but probably the equivalent of a whole fresh fruit in the right quantity. You may even get away with a few Weetabix 'diluted' in, in place of the oats? If all is well mixed up, the carb levels may work for your daughter.
     
  4. clairbear

    clairbear · Newbie

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    Porridge is great! And I can get away with a few berries in mine, also waitrose do a whole grain English muffin which I put peanut or almond butter and banana in, the combination seems to slowly release the carbs
     
  5. michaeldavid

    michaeldavid Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    LOOK IN THE LIST OF INGREDIENTS: Weetabix, along with all of the other supermarkets' junk-cereals mentioned above, contain added sugar.

    The only branded cereal that doesn't contain added sugar is Shredded Wheat.

    It's really very simple: check the ingredients, every time. Dump anything with sugar or honey in it.

    Paradoxically, adding salt to porridge will make it taste a little sweeter.

    Cook porridge with half milk, half water. Milk contains lactose, which is sweet.

    After the porridge is cooked, add a little cold milk. Delicious!

    For anyone who is used to supermarkets' junk-cereals, this will take some getting used-to at first.

    But soon enough, anything for breakfast with added sugar or honey will taste disgusting.
     
  6. Anonymous

    Anonymous · Guest

    Salt on porridge? Why bother? Where do you get your 'non-junk porridge, because it's obviously not from a supermarket pack? The stuff I eat costs 35p a pack in LIDLs, and contains (per 100g) 58g carbs and 0.7g sugar, not that I'm bothered. I guess I am very fortunate as I am able to rely on bG tests and HbA1C, so if I've accidently eaten something with some added sugar in once every 24 hours, it's no big deal for me. How do people find time for living if they are spending time reading packaging and weighing and counting everything? I am probably showing my ignorance about T2 diabetes through not understanding that many people have to live by calculating everything. There, but for the grace of God... etc.

    The only salt we eat is what is already in anything. We don't add salt to spuds, pasta or rice or anything else. It just destroys the underlying flavour and there's enough of it in soy sauce, worcestershire sauce and stock cubes etc. Do people taste their food before adding salt? There's nothing more revolting than watching someone with a Sunday Roast grabbing the salt cellar and piling it on BEFORE they've even tasted the food.
     
  7. michaeldavid

    michaeldavid Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    The problem is that the word 'cereal' is used to describe junk like Weetabix, Cheerios, etc.

    Of course these things do indeed contain cereals - ie. wheat, for example. But branded breakfast 'cereals' (pleases note my use of scare quotes) contain more than mere cereal: they tend to contain added sugar. (Shredded Wheat is the sole exception: it contains only wheat that is shredded - hence the name.)

    That's the reason why I wrote 'branded cereals': Weetabix is a brand-name, so it's a branded breakfast 'cereal'.

    Porridge isn't a brand-name, so it isn't a branded breakfast 'cereal' at all: it doesn't contain any additives, unless you add something yourself, such as salt.

    You don't have to add salt if you don't want to. Each to their own.

    If the 'porridge' you buy from your supermarket has added sugar, then it isn't really just porridge.
     
  8. Anonymous

    Anonymous · Guest

    I am sorry that having two Weetabix with milk once every 24 hours is problematic for you. That's why I said that I probably do not understand what it must be like for other people. I am fortunate in that it doesn't make any significant difference to my target range of bG level (i.e. 4-7 two hours afterwards), which, I am led to believe, control is all about. Also, I have not used sugar in anything for decades, and wouldn't touch a sweet dessert with a bargepole...totally unnecessary conclusion to a meal. If I allowed myself to spend each day weighing, measuring, calculating and reading packaging, then I would say I am not in control of my life, and my aim is to live. As you say, each to their own.
     
  9. michaeldavid

    michaeldavid Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Thanks very much for your response.

    I'm not sure that the person who started this thread - 'Lucy's mummy' - will still be reading it. But I do very much hope that people like her will read it all, and read it all again.

    If I ate even a single Weetabix early in the morning, then - like Lucy herself - my blood-sugar would indeed rocket skywards. (Later in the day, when my insulin has kicked in, then it wouldn't be such a big problem.)

    Moreover, I think you are quite wrong about what counts as effective control of blood-sugar. (You use the words, "I am led to believe"; and that's a clear indication to me that it's your advisors who are really at fault.) You mention "4-7 hours afterwards". But if my blood-sugar EVER goes above around 8mmol/l, then I count that as poor control. (If it approaches 10, then I'm off out for a fast march.) Using mostly the very economical, visually read strips - see my other postings - I very happily, and completely painlessly, test my blood-sugar around 15-20 times per day (I do hope Lucy's mummy's reading this: nb. I never use the wretched, spring-loaded gadgets - they're completely unnecessary.) It's no big deal.

    I believe that the companies who produce breakfast 'cereals' with added, refined carbohydrates are morally corrupt. (If you want to add your own sugar to what you eat, that's fine by me.) Whatever they might say, they know perfectly well that the stuff they produce and market towards young minds is effectively addictive. (I have a young mind myself, even though I'm in my mid-fifties.) Of course lots of people want to buy the stuff: they're already effectively hooked.

    Incidentally, I don't normally weigh, or measure, or calculate anything. (I don't need to; see my other postings.) But I certainly read a lot, packaging included.
     
  10. Anonymous

    Anonymous · Guest

    Very good advice in your first paragraph.

    What I wrote was 4-7 two hours afterwards, not 4-7 hours afterwards. And my advisers are DU and other official sources who seem to have relatively similar guidance. Where do you get your range guidance from? I thought I said I haven't eaten sugar for decades, so where did you read that I like to add sugar? I also did not say that you, personally weigh, measure, or calculate.

    I suggest politely that, if you are going to give advice or comment, please read what people say very carefully first, as it could make a difference one way or other to some.
     
  11. Anonymous

    Anonymous · Guest

    Hi, how have you and your daughter been getting on since you first posted?
     
  12. michaeldavid

    michaeldavid Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I apologise for misreading and misquoting. I'm sometimes a bit too hurried. Your criticism is very fair.

    Here's a quick edit, however: The point I was making remains the same. Never mind about just 'two hours afterwards'. I want to be sure that my blood-sugar does not go above 7 at all, if I can help it.

    I'm not sure what 'DU' stands for. But anyway, I get my guidance from experience, and from reading.

    I can't remember the professor's name at the Elsie Bertram Diabetes Centre in Norwich ('Mike' something), but he did once tell me that my HbA1c readings are as good as, or better than, a lot of people who are non-diabetic.

    When I wrote "If you want to add sugar, ..." I should have written "If one wants to add sugar, ...". That was certainly what I intended to mean. However I do apologise for my carelessness.

    As regards weighing, measuring, calculating etc., I have certainly noticed on this forum that people seem obsessed with doing that. (I believe that's a function of the poor professional advice they get.) But my blood-sugar control is really very good indeed, without the need for any of that.

    Again, I apologise for being a bit careless. And I'm very happy for you, or anyone else, to point out any mistakes that I might have made, or to make any criticism.

    I'm a bit Aspergerish, incidentally: I show features of Asperger's syndrome, that is to say. Accordingly, I'm really quite obsessive. If I notice any mistake in what I've written, I will immediately endeavour to rectify it with an edit.
     
  13. Anonymous

    Anonymous · Guest

    Now there's a coincidence. I am also very pedantic with words (too many years in IBM! having to make sure everything was unambiguous etc.). Maybe I am a sufferer too! 'Er indoors would definitely agree. :D

    Your HbA1C sounds good. My next one is in July, so I may have to eat my (low carb) hat! Now there's a thought ... a straw boater may have more carbs than a stetson.

    I am pleased you mentioned obsessiveness. I've been wanting to say that but a bit nervous of upsetting anyone. My feeling is that some people, quite rightly, are shocked and upset by diagnosis, and wanting an instant cure (Newcastle Diet?) and that, perhaps, a better course of action would be to deal with that anxiety ... but none will get that on the NHS.

    My approach has been 'top-down' so to speak, in starting with my current diet and adjusting, rather than 'bottom-up' by cutting down on loads of things at once then working back up (or not as the case may be). My problem is with getting slight, but regular hypos (3.9 bg and below) which often happens after the third dog-walk of the day, which suggests not enough carbs during the day!! But, I've got so used to it that I have the confidence to grab an apple or something, which, whilst not instant, gets my bG back up fairly soon. I even sat and waited once for an hour (bit risky) and found my bG up in the 4s again with nothing to eat, although a bit of a pointless exercise.

    PS ... DU is Diabetics UK, I have assumed.
     
  14. michaeldavid

    michaeldavid Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Obsessiveness is ideal for controlling diabetes.

    I strongly recommend that you simply try eating rye bread. (You need to be a bit obsessive about it!) You might like to take a look at some of the other posts I've been making in the past few days: I made one last night, quite lengthy, regarding the regimen I follow. (Cf. 'Diabetes Soapbox - Have Your Say': 'Test Strips'.)

    I'm not sure if it will help you as much as it helps me, but I cannot overstate how important it is for me - and almost certainly for Lucy too, whoever she is - regarding the simple moderation of blood-sugar levels. Touch wood, I hardly ever have a serious hypo nowadays.

    I would be surprised if you find that doesn't help. But don't overdo it. If you eat too much rye in one go, then your blood-sugar will go high later. I stop eating rye bread at around four in the afternoon. (But now I'm just repeating what I wrote in the post I made last night.)

    If you have any comments to make on what you find, I would be very interested to see them.
     
  15. martin2410

    martin2410 Type 2 · Member

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    I find that a small amount of hot milk makes shredded wheat (big or small) moist. In fact I bought some mini shredded wheat from Aldi today to try as Im getting bored of weetabix every morning. Thing is, at 3am its hard to make any food decision, but I have to eat then to take the metformin before going to work.
     
  16. LASPORTSTHERAPY

    LASPORTSTHERAPY · Member

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    Hello,

    By the sounds of it, you are regulating your Daughter's sugars as best you can. You will find that it gets easier over time. In the beginning it is trial and error but then you find something that works. My Brother and I were diagnosed with type 1 from a very early age. We are now grown up (only in age ;) and look after ourselves. I'm on 12.5 units of lantus, which I take at 10pm before bed and 3/4 shots of between 5 and 7.5 humalog depending upon how often and what I eat.

    I learnt early on that bananas are high in the glycemic index: http://www.diabetes.org.uk/Guide-to-dia ... tAodXykA-Q

    I eat them before training in the gym or going for a bike ride/excessive exercise in any form. I always keep one or two in my bag and in the car. They are a God send! My diet is mainly low GI. If I want something higher in the index then I always mix it with protein and something lower in the GI table. Weetabix rockets my sugars so I never touch that! You get to know what works and what doesn't. It's not a one size fits all. Just always check your Daughters sugar levels and you'll both be right as rain. Unfortunately, I know someone that is on the kidney transplant because of their terrible diabetic control. This does not need to happen.
     
  17. JoCo

    JoCo · Member

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    Same sort of thing mid morning - high, and late morning low. Now I inject and have breakfast - 2 shredded wheat (no sugar on top !!) - and only eat after at least 20 mins,upto 40mins (dizzy!), and this totally smooths out the morning. I still need a mid morning snack of three plain biscuits or I am staggering a bit by lunch time at work, but this has helped alot. Normally I only inject after eating so i can properly measure carbs.
     
  18. MARTINSSUNSET

    MARTINSSUNSET · Newbie

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    A little bit off topic and not a suggestion for a cereal but I have found that a Hartleys Low Calorie jelly is ideal for me for breakfast. It is quick and easy and if you are feeling a little decadent you can add a splash of cream on the top of the pot. I know as a kid I loved Jelly so this may help.

    Also following a low carb diet the different flavour fruit jellys are a welcome taste as I do miss fruit.
     
  19. Anonymous

    Anonymous · Guest

    I used to love jelly as a kid with tinned tangerines in!! In the days when kids' parties had that kind of stuff, instead of pizzaa and McDonalds. Why no fruit? I am not a low-carber and so I don't understand why fruits are taboo.
     
  20. MARTINSSUNSET

    MARTINSSUNSET · Newbie

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    I was surprised how many carbs were in fruit when I started my low carb diet. I try to eat no more than 20g a meal. I used to love eating a couple of granny smiths at my desk during the day until I realised they were app 18 - 20g per apple depending on the size.

    Berries are a lower carb option.
     
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