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Alternatives to weetabix??

Discussion in 'Parents' started by Lucy's mummy, Apr 12, 2013.

  1. Anonymous

    Anonymous · Guest

    I certainly admire your self-control and discipline. My 2 apples, two oranges and a banana would use up my daily allowance of carbs! :(
     
  2. MissPiggy

    MissPiggy · Member

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    Have you tried oatibix? They work for me but it might appease your little one to have something similar to weetabix :) I'm honeymooning too and struggle as an adult so my heart goes out to you with your little one <3 xx
     
  3. Anonymous

    Anonymous · Guest

    I tried a homemade muesli yesterday with oats, dried mixed fruits, chopped nuts and a little milk which gave me a 5.1, but, since fruits seem to be a no-no for some people, it may not be good for others.
     
  4. jeangoo

    jeangoo Type 2 · Member

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    I find shredded wheat better for my levels and I do add a small squirt of runny honey. Weetabix and porridge set my levels up too much.
     
  5. jeangoo

    jeangoo Type 2 · Member

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    Forgot to say a small banana is a no-no for me too. But yoghurt with a few berries and again a small squirt of honey to take the edge off is another good alternative for brekkie or a snack. Works for me anyway.
     
  6. Anonymous

    Anonymous · Guest

    Hi, just curious. When you say small bananas are a no-no, do you mean that results in your bG going above the target ceiling, or above what you have set yourself as a personal target?
     
  7. flashsusie

    flashsusie · Member

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    Hello Lucy's Mummy
    I am not sure if my advice is the best. As I am a Type 2. Have you tried the new All Bran Crunch Cereal. A small bowl with some added berries or half a banana. Im confused about the milk in diets. I have changed and use Alpro as its low in fat. The other nice thing is what about a boiled egg with granary or rye bread toasted soldiers. I find eating protien at breakfast works for me and keeps me full to lunchtime. Not sure if this is the same in children. Scrambled eggs are also yummy on wholemeal toast. I really feal for you in understanding the food groups and what is good and what works for a young child. I am a Healthcare professional and still find it all confusing. Its all in the labels. Marketing is such a big thing with food products but I have found if its 0% fat it will have a load of sugar, it has to, to make it taste half decent. Good luck with Lucy's breakfasts and I hope she finds some new alternatives that will suit her and she will enjoy. Best wishes Susie X
     
  8. Nicholamarch

    Nicholamarch · Newbie

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    I haven't read the whole thread so apologies if someone has said this already. Insultard is a slow releasing insulin maybe she needs a faster acting one like novarapid.
    Shredded wheat is a slower releasing carbohydrate. I expect if you talk to your specialist they might change the type of insulin she is on. It's my husband who has been a diabetic since he was 7 (29 years) says he used to use insultard at night but when he was first diagnosed he used a mixture of insulins.
     
  9. rinfrance

    rinfrance Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I make my porridge out of 2/3 cup of oats, 1 cup water, 1/4 cup of currants, a small tea spoon of both muscadet and 1 of cinamon. Its relatively low carb, the cinamon is good for Db, the oats are very high in fibre. If you want add 1/2 tea spoon of either sugar or splenda etc but normally the currants etc make it sweet enough.
    now several times a week I have bacon, tomato, mushrooms and an egg fried in olive oil. I do have sometimes Oaribix or Oariflakes, however they do wang up the BS but I now have them with soya milk.
    My doctor reckons that of all his patients my bs control is the best, but even I have problems.
    I now make my own sausages, and hamburgers getting the stuff from Tong and whilst they do have a bit of salt and rusk the end result is not a problem for me.
    Bought products have stabilizers, monosodium glutamate, milk powder and god knows what else. The tong stuff does not.
    I do not have them with buns though!
     
  10. phoenix

    phoenix Type 1 · Expert

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    think Porridge is fine , not sure about the muscadet for a 5 year old though would have thought milk and some fruit (berries perhaps) would be more appropriate than sweet wine!.
     
  11. Kat100

    Kat100 · Guest

    Hi flah sussie you are eating my breakfast!!!!!
    I love the crunch bran and a banana...I find wheetabix makes me sleep all morning....think it's the banana that keeps me awake....I am still at the learning stage...
    As for being a health professional....it's no good unless you know all abt this subject which is vast I feel vey confused at the moment....meanwhile keep on munching on that bran :)
     
  12. robertconroy

    robertconroy Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    All grains are high glycemic. That's the worst thing a diabetic can eat - t1 or t2. If you are type 2, grains are the reason you're diabetic. Wheat flower is higher glycemic than table sugar by weight. We're now consuming an average of a 1/2 lb of wheat per person, per day here in the U.S.
     
  13. phoenix

    phoenix Type 1 · Expert

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    Not all grains are high glycemic , particularly in their whole form. Pearl barley (GI between 22 and 29), coarse oats, quinoia are good examples. (most people in the UK probably use oats for porridge but barley porridge was probably as traditional in England as oats in Scotland) Quite a few recipes on the net for various wholegrain porridges though some include quite a lot of sugar.

    The Univ of Sydney GI news suggests that a good breakfast should include some low GI carb, some protein and some fruit or veg.
    http://ginews.blogspot.fr/2010_03_01_archive.html

    Searching ( and ploughing through their newsletter) results comes up with some nice ideas and recipes
    Heres a page of recipes specifically for children with T1. It includes a useful Muesli bar.
    http://ginews.blogspot.fr/2007/07/low-g ... month.html

    This page demonstrates how to change a breakfast slightly and lower the glycemic load of a typical packet cereal type breakfast (GL 48 to one of 31 ) a worthwhile reduction if you can find a boxed cereal with a similarly low GI to this Aussie product.
    http://ginews.blogspot.fr/2007_07_01_archive.html


    Robert
    This thread is about a 5 year old T1s breakfast so completely off topic) but you might like to compare the wheat intake in the US today with that eaten in the late 19century. http://www.ers.usda.gov/topics/crops/wh ... -diet.aspx
    (likewise make comparisons with other places in the world, where I live in France they still eat more wheat than in the US mostly in bread (the staple). Bread consumption has fallen dramatically and diabetes levels have risen)
     
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