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Am I In Remission?

Discussion in 'Type 2 Diabetes' started by Eurobuff, Apr 14, 2020.

  1. Jim Lahey

    Jim Lahey I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    @HSSS I meant to add that seed oils also damage mitochondria and seriously impair the cell's ability to process glucose into ATP. Essentially the mitochondria shut down and begin rejecting fuel. However I do not know if this damage is permanent. Since cells are replaced, you would think not, but it will certainly persist as long as the oils are being consumed. It's not all about carbohydrate, for sure.
     
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  2. Daphne917

    Daphne917 Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    I average between 100g to 130g carbs per day but still manage to maintain my hba1c at non diabetic levels
     
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  3. Eurobuff

    Eurobuff Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Can I ask what your hba1c is? I eat 50g carbs per day. A few months ago, my low carb options on some of my foods weren’t available so I was eating about 60-65 grams per day. My hba1c went from 36mmol to 42mmol. That was only an increase of 10-15 grams
     
  4. Daphne917

    Daphne917 Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    Tends to hover in the mid 30s.
     
  5. Mbaker

    Mbaker Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    I always find this conversation fascinating, as in the UK there is an official NHS code for Diabetes in Remission; so whilst it is ok to have a view as to what good control is, ultimately a British health establishment authorised to do so can grant a legal status of Diabetes in Remission. Obviously many do not feel comfortable with this as it always is opinionated down to an individual level, whereas something like cancer in remission does not appear to have similar nuances.

    I have an hypothesis that the current generation and perhaps mine have been "weakened" by the insulin / glucose load and pufa based oils. I remember reading a review of the average fasting glucose in Nigeria rising over time (I think this has happened everywhere). I further believe years of use of non-clean carbs / sugars "breaks" our systems, which means "clean" whole starches are also a problem for our systems; I honestly believe that if the metabolically challenged were eating whole foods from birth, even including starchy foods - minus the foods of the trifecta (seed oils, flour and sugar), diabetes incidence would be lower, and other conditions. For some reason we think one of the trifecta which causes the most amount of hospital dental procedures for children aged 5 to 9 for tooth extraction, magically should be continued into adult hood to oxidise the bad fats.
     
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  6. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 (in remission!) · Legend

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    My GP coded me as diabetes in remission some time ago. All I have lost are the annual foot checks by the nurse. I continue to have 6 monthly blood tests, an annual retina eye screening test, and an annual review with the nurse. My HbA1cs have varied between 40 and 44 during this period. My nurse also coded me as non-diabetic hypoglycemic but the GP has removed this coding. It is just a label, and as long as I continue to receive the tests and checks, I am happy. (I don't care about having HbA1c tests because I continue to self test and am happy with what I see. What I do like are the accompanying tests for cholesterol, liver and kidney functions, vit D, full blood counts and whatever else gets thrown in)
     
  7. Michelle80

    Michelle80 · Member

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    I know this is a fairly old post and I have only joined this forum today

    I had my full set of bloods done on Monday afternoon, my HBA1C is 34
    My GP when I spoke to her today has said mine is also in remission but she wants to do repeat bloods in 3 months time

    I just want to say congratulations to you though, its a great feeling but I'm also quite nervous as I've now been told to stop all medication
     
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  8. Eurobuff

    Eurobuff Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    At the moment the doctor is prescribing my test strips, and I am getting my bloods checked, feet, eyes etc checked regularly. I am worried that if I’m described as “ In remission” all these checks will stop. As the hba1c is an average, I think my lows are cancelling the highs out, so maybe not getting the true figure
     
  9. HSSS

    HSSS Type 2 · Expert

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    If you’re not on medication (and barring any uncommon other conditions such as RH) then your “lows” are almost certainly “normals” as it is usually only medication that takes a person genuinely low, And definitely part of the true figure, leaving any highs to raise it above normal. What numbers do you mean?
     
  10. DCB 2

    DCB 2 Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    Here the paper with the actual definition:
    https://diabetestimes.co.uk/abcd-and-pcds-produce-type-2-diabetes-remission-definition/
    One good thing it specifically mentions the need for regular fallow up.

    Remission - Well Controlled, what is the difference? The important thing is the that the blood sugar levels are under control. My personal definition is remission they are within normal ranges, and well controlled are within acceptable diabetic targets.
    My type 2 diabetes condition is something I have to deal with the rest of my life. I treat it like the exercises that I have to do for my bad knees, something, else I have to manage. I do enjoy my occasional dietary rebellions I worked REAL hard to get to that point. I just try to be smart about it

    I apologize for the abruptness of my response. Let us just say going quietly in to that sweet night is not part of my personality.
     
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    #30 DCB 2, Jun 5, 2020 at 2:57 PM
    Last edited: Jun 5, 2020
  11. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 (in remission!) · Legend

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    Yet another definition of remission that only requires basic control (fasting glucose under 7 and HbA1c under 48) on two separate tests at least 6 months apart, plus weight loss. Too much emphasis is put on weight loss in this definition! Of course, it is a good thing to lose weight, but there are many T2s who have no weight to lose to begin with, and many who are overweight that gain remission under this criteria but have not lost weight.

    As I have mentioned before. I have been coded as In Remission but I still have 6 monthly blood checks, an annual review with the nurse, and an annual eye check. All I have lost is the foot check.
     
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  12. Eurobuff

    Eurobuff Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi, my lows are between 3.2, to 4.3. I have had a few 3.9’s, 4.2, 4.3, lower than 3.9 happens but not as much. I am taking a tablet (non diabetic related) which can cause hypos in diabetics
     
  13. Eurobuff

    Eurobuff Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Thanks. Do you know why you’ve lost the foot check? My feet, neuropathy was my initial symptom in the days when I didn’t know when I was diabetic. I’ve managed to get some socks which ease it, but without them I suffer every day with it. So I think my feet are probably the most at risk
     
  14. HSSS

    HSSS Type 2 · Expert

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    Plenty of non diabetics walk around in the higher 3’s just fine as the body kicks in and delivers a glucose dump to rectify things it it falls too low. And home meters aren’t perfect. Anything in the 4’s is fine for most and “normal”. Unless the 3’s or lower 4’s make you feel you feel unwell or there’s something about the medication or other condition to cause concern I wouldn’t worry, if they self correct just fine.
     
  15. Eurobuff

    Eurobuff Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I feel dizzy, my eyes go blurry, and feel drunk. When it has been in the 3’s It’s a real struggle to get to the kitchen to get something to eat.
     
  16. Ray807

    Ray807 Prediabetes · Member

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    Which non diabetic medication are you taking?
     
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