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Anybody else in the same boat?

Discussion in 'Type 2 Diabetes' started by Wren88, Sep 30, 2017.

  1. Wren88

    Wren88 Type 2 · Newbie

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    Hi, i'm Jenny i'm 29 and I was diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes 8 years ago. When I was first diagnosed my BMI was 28, overweight but not obese. Initially I didn't take it in and ignored it for a few years, I guess I was in denial. After a few years I got the cycling bug and got my BMI down to 23.5, my diabetes went into remission and all was good. However recently my BMI has gone up to 25 and my diabetes is making an almighty come back with my HBA1c going from 32 two years ago to 80 in june! I have lost 6Ibs and my BMI is 24.6. Despite this my HBA1c has risen to 90. I haven't had the time or commitment to cycle like I would like to and plan to make this change now I have finished my degree. I saw my doctor yesterday as I am feeling really unwell, my doctor advised that she feels that losing weight will no longer control my diabetes as currently I am not overweight and my diabetes continues to worsen. She also feels that as I was never large that my diabetes isn't caused by my weight and is what she referred to as a 'true diabetes'. I said that I planned to lose weight to control it again and she said that as I don't have much to lose as i'm already a healthy weight she feels now the issue is that my pancreas has began to slowly die. I feel so conflicted with what I read about the causes of type 2 and my doctors advise. I don't like the idea of taking medications, however I'm at a point where I can no longer continue with my high sugar levels, its effecting every element of my life. I have started Metformin and have a plan for the next 4 weeks to go to the maximum dose. I just wondered if theres anybody else out there my age with a similar situation. It feels so unfair that i'm a normal weight, more active than most people I know yet i'm lumbered with the disease. Any feedback would be great. Many thanks
     
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  2. Indy51

    Indy51 Type 2 · Expert

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    Hi and welcome to the forum.

    It would help if you can give us an idea of your daily food intake, it may give us some clues.

    @daisy1 will be along with some information that may be helpful to you.
     
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  3. Oldvatr

    Oldvatr Type 2 · Expert

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    Actually there are many here who are classed as TOFI (thin outside, fat inside) who have a regular BMI but also have Diabetes, When I was having an HbA1c similar in value to yours, I took steps to change my diet and lifestyle to avoid the threatened Insulin treatment, and I found that it worked well for me, so can I suggest you take a serious look at the Low Carb diet section since it is easy to follow, almost instant to take effect, and there are many success stories using it being reported in the Testimonials section of this forum. Even if you decide it is not for you,then can I strongly advise using a glucose meter to test how your meals affect your bgl, and hence cut out thosefoods that are harmful in term of bgl spikes. It is called Eating to Meter and is a very important tool in the arsenal. Most T2's find they have to fund these privately, but it is well worth it.

    I have to say that the Metformin, even on max dose, will do precious little to bring your bgl down, It only has a couple of mmol/l effect on numbers, but offers other protective effects against T2 ravages. It also has renowned side effects that this forum covers in TMI detail.

    There are many variants of Low Carb diets described on this forum, and realistically I support them in favour of medication. The other diet that seems to be gaining respect is the Newcastle Diet.
     
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    #3 Oldvatr, Sep 30, 2017 at 11:45 AM
    Last edited: Sep 30, 2017
  4. daisy1

    daisy1 Type 2 · Legend
    Retired Moderator

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    @Wren88

    Hello Jenny and welcome to the Forum :) Here is the Basic Information we give to new members and I hope you will find it useful. Below is a link to the Low Carb Program which could help you. Ask more questions when you need to and someone will be able to answer.


    BASIC INFORMATION FOR NEW MEMBERS

    Diabetes is the general term to describe people who have blood that is sweeter than normal. A number of different types of diabetes exist.

    A diagnosis of diabetes tends to be a big shock for most of us. It’s far from the end of the world though and on this forum you'll find well over 250,000 people who are demonstrating this.

    On the forum we have found that with the number of new people being diagnosed with diabetes each day, sometimes the NHS is not being able to give all the advice it would perhaps like to deliver - particularly with regards to people with type 2 diabetes.

    The role of carbohydrate

    Carbohydrates are a factor in diabetes because they ultimately break down into sugar (glucose) within our blood. We then need enough insulin to either convert the blood sugar into energy for our body, or to store the blood sugar as body fat.

    If the amount of carbohydrate we take in is more than our body’s own (or injected) insulin can cope with, then our blood sugar will rise.

    The bad news

    Research indicates that raised blood sugar levels over a period of years can lead to organ damage, commonly referred to as diabetic complications.

    The good news

    People on the forum here have shown that there is plenty of opportunity to keep blood sugar levels from going too high. It’s a daily task but it’s within our reach and it’s well worth the effort.

    Controlling your carbs

    The info below is primarily aimed at people with type 2 diabetes, however, it may also be of benefit for other types of diabetes as well.

    There are two approaches to controlling your carbs:
    • Reduce your carbohydrate intake
    • Choose ‘better’ carbohydrates
    Reduce your carbohydrates

    A large number of people on this forum have chosen to reduce the amount of carbohydrates they eat as they have found this to be an effective way of improving (lowering) their blood sugar levels.

    The carbohydrates which tend to have the most pronounced effect on blood sugar levels tend to be starchy carbohydrates such as rice, pasta, bread, potatoes and similar root vegetables, flour based products (pastry, cakes, biscuits, battered food etc) and certain fruits.

    Choosing better carbohydrates

    The low glycaemic index diet is often favoured by healthcare professionals but some people with diabetes find that low GI does not help their blood sugar enough and may wish to cut out these foods altogether.

    Read more on carbohydrates and diabetes.

    Over 145,000 people have taken part in the Low Carb Program - a free 10 week structured education course that is helping people lose weight and reduce medication dependency by explaining the science behind carbs, insulin and GI.

    Eating what works for you

    Different people respond differently to different types of food. What works for one person may not work so well for another. The best way to see which foods are working for you is to test your blood sugar with a glucose meter.

    To be able to see what effect a particular type of food or meal has on your blood sugar is to do a test before the meal and then test after the meal. A test 2 hours after the meal gives a good idea of how your body has reacted to the meal.

    The blood sugar ranges recommended by NICE are as follows:

    Blood glucose ranges for type 2 diabetes
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 8.5 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (adults)
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 9 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (children)
    • Before meals: 4 to 8 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 10 mmol/l
    However, those that are able to, may wish to keep blood sugar levels below the NICE after meal targets.

    Access to blood glucose test strips

    The NICE guidelines suggest that people newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes should be offered:

    • structured education to every person and/or their carer at and around the time of diagnosis, with annual reinforcement and review
    • self-monitoring of plasma glucose to a person newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes only as an integral part of his or her self-management education

    Therefore both structured education and self-monitoring of blood glucose should be offered to people with type 2 diabetes. Read more on getting access to blood glucose testing supplies.

    You may also be interested to read questions to ask at a diabetic clinic.

    Note: This post has been edited from Sue/Ken's post to include up to date information.

    Take part in Diabetes.co.uk digital education programs and improve your understanding. They're all free.
    • Low Carb Program - it's made front-page news of the New Scientist and The Times. Developed with 20,000 people with type 2 diabetes; 96% of people who take part recommend it... find out why
    • Hypo Program - improve your understanding of hypos. There's a version for people with diabetes, parents/guardians of children with type 1, children with type 1 diabetes, teachers and HCPs.
     
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  5. badcat

    badcat · Guest

    Im not an expert, but i would have thought diagnosis with T2 at 21 and without a history of obesity is unusual. May be worth asking about testing for LADA or Mody
     
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  6. OrsonKartt

    OrsonKartt Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi there. Well I'm not your age but a year ago I had bmi of 24 /25 and was diagnosed as type 2. Against advise I did the Newcastle diet and my sugar levels dropped drastically. After 8 weeks of the diet I went low carb. Today a year later I feel so much better. My bmi is around 19 and my sugar levels are mainly under control. There are things I don't eat now and I use the car a little less and cycle and walk a little more. It's been a tough year but well worth it. I've been encouraged in many, many ways in this forum You are in the right place as it really helps sharing and learning, checking things out , reading, testing and putting in place a personal system you can live with. I wish you well. Oh and re doctors and advise. I've found that they seem to be so far behind the learning curve - sorry about that.
     
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  7. Slalom

    Slalom Type 2 · Member

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    I cycle a lot, and after excercise I just try to initially get the salts back into balance Banana (potassium) and something salty. Then try to eat to maintain weight.

    If you stop you have to reduce the extras exercise allowed.
     
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  8. pleinster

    pleinster Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    there are a number of things that can cause Type 2 diabetes without weight being any kind of an issue. I myself, for example, have never been overweight but got diabetes as a result of medication I was taking (in my case Steroid Induced Diabetes).
     
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  9. pleinster

    pleinster Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I have never been overweight in my life. I was diagnosed as Type 2 diabetic as a result of steroids I was prescribed as part of my treatment following a kidney transplant required due to an inherited condition. I don't like the idea of taking med either..who does? I am on plenty, I can assure you...and just as well. BUT, I am not on any meds for diabetes because I dramatically reduced carbohydrates from my diet and refuse the pills...my blood sugar is pretty much under control and has been for the last two years. I do no exercise at all because I am physically bone idle! If you haven't tried a low carb diet, I suggest you do now; carbohydrates effectively change to sugar in the diet... and cutting them out will bring the blood sugar level down. I hope the comment that your pancreas has begin to slowly die doesn't stop you trying...all our organs are slowly dying...yeah ? The cold truth ? Yes it is unfair...and then what ? Don't wait for karma or justice...cut the carbs and fight the thing some more. You are still very young with a lot ahead of you..don't be defined by this. Good luck, pal.
     
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  10. badcat

    badcat · Guest

    T2 still questionable diagnosis for people at age 21yrs
     
  11. Oldvatr

    Oldvatr Type 2 · Expert

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    I agree that LADA may be indicated in this case, The doctor refers to the rise in bgl as being indicative of "true diabetes" which I read as being aware of maybe an insulin deficiency due to underlying autoimune disease.

    I hope that the doctor is arranging for the appropriate diagnostic checks (i.e. GAD, C-peptide) to either confirm or eliminate this possibility,

    It may still be T2D, since I managed to drop my >100 HbA1C down to 42 in a few months on a LC diet, and I am still low even though I have reduced most of my diabetic meds.
     
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  12. Freema

    Freema Type 2 · Expert

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    We are many here in the same boat, it doesn’t hurt to loose a bit more weight so if you want that Then keep on the fine job you are doing , but that said the main road to lower numbers of blood glucose is and will remain being eating a lower number of grams of carbs in total in a day untill there is found a real cure for type 2 diabetes.

    Try changing to a breakfast of almost NO carbs , and lower your carb levels in all other meals you eat in a day and try if a total number of 150 grams of carbs is low enough to lower your numbers or go even lower like under 100 grams a day , Then I Think you can get your numbers den effectively
     
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    #12 Freema, Oct 2, 2017 at 12:33 PM
    Last edited: Oct 2, 2017
  13. pleinster

    pleinster Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Agreed - but by no means impossible...we are yet to identify every "cause" and there are an awful lot of drugs out there...many of them illegal, and while I am certainly not suggesting for a moment that this applies in any way to the OP - more and more young people are at risk every day through drugs the contents of which are a mystery to those who sell them let alone to those who take them...and I can only see that getting worse. Still, yup - point taken.
     
  14. Starbuck28

    Starbuck28 Type 2 · Member

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    Hi Wren88
    Firstly try not to let the diagnosis be the end of your life - and try not to read and believe every article or opinion you see on line. I am very lucky and have excellent support from My GP and the surgery where they have a dedicated Diabetic nurse. Firstly If your GP surgery has one of those make an appointment to see her, or if you have a diabetic clinic locally ring them to make an appointment to see the specialist diabetic nurse. As someone here has suggested some GPs are a bit out of the loop or unawares of treatments etc.
    Often high sugars is an indication of the fact insulin is building in your body - despite belief this will not destroy your pancreas, being diabetic means that either your pancreas doesn't produce insulin or produce rubbish insulin, in the case of the later it will eventually wear out and as your GP says "die"
    It is highly likely that if you are as she refers to it a "true" diabetic then Metforin will not really help to reduce huge sugar levels but could help as part of a Insulin , Metformin regime.
    I actually hate the term True Diabetic as it muddy the waters as there actually are many different forms of Diabetes and no one size fits all with regards to treatment.
    You can help yourself by eating less Simple Carbs or eating complex carbs instead.
    Work out which time is best for you for certain meals i.e.; if it is best to have a big meal evening or lunch time (don't eat till you are stuffed as your body will turn it all to sugars and fats)
    Don't starve yourself - it will only make your body produce more sugars and fats that you have no insulin that can convert it.
    Be good at reading your sugars and get to know your body - get to know when you are hungry and get to know when you are hyper or hyper as often they all feel the same.
    Finally sorry to say this - you are a diabetic regardless of it going into so called remission or "going away" it doesn't matter if you are T1 T2 MODY or whatever diagnosis of diabetes - it hasn't gone away or gone into remission it just means you had control over your sugars, probably due to the amount of exercise you were doing. But its not the end of the world..... Good luck and I do hope you get some control.
     
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  15. rachaelc

    rachaelc Type 2 · Active Member

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    Enquire about dapagliflozin or forxiga, this makes you pee out any excess sugar and lose internal weight. It may not be sutiable as you're already low on weight, but worth asking.BTW I am not as it suggests, insulin dependent. I've been T2D for 19 yrs and am on tablets.
     
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  16. ickihun

    ickihun Type 2 · Master

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    I had symptoms at 6yrs old. Not diagnosed til I was 32yrs old. With type2 diabetes. Metformin worked brilliantly at controlling my diabetes for a decade, inbetween 2 insulin fed pregnancies. I added weight when my bgs were over 6mmol/l.
    When I keep my bgs below 6mmol/l I lose the weight I've added whilst being uncontrolled.
    Type1s normally lose weight when uncontrolled without insulin.
    Do you lose weight when your bgs are high?
    8yrs can deteriorate your disease.
    I'm low carbing and on insulin theraphy. Losing weight most weeks, currently.
    My bmi was 51 now 44.
    Awaiting bariatric surgery as diet makes a huge difference to my diabetes care.
    I'm currently disabled with my back and walking difficulties. Just starting with numb toes (neuropathy maybe) even thou last hba1c was 48.
     
  17. Tim13056

    Tim13056 Type 2 · Newbie

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    I've done tons of research since being diagnosed 4 years ago, and I've read nothing that would suggest that Type 2 could be reversed without adopting a ketogenic (LCHF) way of eating. Diabetes is *NOT* caused by obesity; both are results of insulin resistance. I've completely reversed Type 2, and all my health markers are the normal range. I've been ketogenic since November, 2013; and doing intermitteng fasting since January this year. I would never go back.
     
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  18. Oldvatr

    Oldvatr Type 2 · Expert

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    Although I do not like it, the current trend to treat T2 by bariatric procedures is a viable solution, I believe. That said, I support keto dieting for improving T2 condition, but I am not convinced it is the only diet that could achieve it. There are other LC diets that seem to be effective, and there is also the Mediterranean diet that some have used successfully. The Newcastle Diet is interesting in that it is not specifically a carb restricted diet, but it does seem to be attaining successful 'reversal' too.
     
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  19. kathblain

    kathblain Type 1 · Newbie

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    Please get your doctor to run an antibody screen I was initially wrongly diagnosed as type 2 diabetes and lost 4.5 stone over 9 months trying to put my diabetes into remission I was getting progressively more ill and my glucose level rising . My doctor gave me metformin and it made things worse and I showed all the signs of rampant diabetes which I had not done before excessive thirst up at night no energy not sleeping and high glucose levels. I felt like death warmed up and could not get my doctor to take me seriously till she saw me and sent me to diabetic clinic that day. I had blood glucose 24 and ketones 3 and was seriously ill. Diabetic nurse almost not letting me home and was started on insulin more or less on arrival in clinic. Antibody test showed I was making antibodies against the insulin producing cells confirming type 1 diabetes. Feel much better but not completely stable on insulin. I am alarmed you are expressing how ill you feel in the way I would have expressed it. Please get your doctor to check your glucose and ketones or get yourself referred to diabetic clinic. By the time I was sent clinic was alarmed.
     
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  20. busydiabeticmum

    busydiabeticmum I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    It is really upsetting when everyone assumes because it is diabetes then it is YOUR FAULT! To be told that you are fat and unhealthy etc that you did it to yourself... but that isn't the way it works. That is just the way it is reported... showed pictures of extremely over weight people eating an unhealthy... but then there is reality, which is... there is no one size fits all. You can look at that picture all you like, do you compare? What can really get you down is when you sit next to someone who is eating and drinking what they want, boasting about how the doctors were wrong and how they keep testing them for diabetes just because of their weight... then there is you, you are a LOT thinner, healthier and taking steps to take care of yourself... maybe on medication and still struggling... you feel like it is so unfair.
    Problem is not this but the mindset you are using. What is advertised isn't the truth... diabetes for some is a blessing (yes I said it) it can change our lives for the better, make food taste better, let us see more of the world, meet new people who enrich our lives... it just depends on how you look at it and how you use this.

    FYI I am steroid induced diabetic... I have asthma and steroids cause my Bgl to rise... the stress hormones just make my liver release glucose into my blood, while my pancreas can't keep up! My only solution is to stay in ketogenic state... thus my liver has nothing to dump! It can be depressing but I can't let it win. It can really annoy you when people say "oh you must have lost a lot of weight" when you tell them you are diabetic... grrrr. That includes gps and consultants and yes I do correct them... but some are too arrogant to accept they are wrong. Yes I have lost weight but I was never that big to begin with.... losing weight was a by product of me being ketogenic and controlling bgl. Everyone is different but you need to look at this from a different perspective... try to be positive.
     
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