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Are there any Australians here that can help me please?

Discussion in 'Diabetes Discussions' started by slinkimalinki, Oct 31, 2016.

  1. slinkimalinki

    slinkimalinki Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I was diagnosed with Type 2 early August, and my Endocrinologist decided I didn't need a monitor, and put me on Metformin.

    However, I am so muddled with what I eat and how I feel, the only way that I can think of to see how I react to food is to test after meals.

    Sooo, what blood glucose monitors are other Aussies using. I use a Windows phone so the Dario is out for me, but I would love something similar. And where do I buy it from? Urgh, total newbie here.

    Help me, pleeeeeeeeese.

    Silvia
     
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  2. walnut_face

    walnut_face Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Welcome Silvia, you are right to test after meals, it is the ONLY way to know how you react to a food. There are quite a few Australians here @Indy51 springs to mind. I will also ask @daisy1 to post some really useful info that applies to all of us
     
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  3. Tipetoo

    Tipetoo Type 2 · Expert

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    Before you get a meter join the NDSS, do this as it free and you will get subsidised strip till the end of December as a T2. Your GP has to sign and stamp this form.

    I hope you have a good relationship with your GP (Not the Endo) as you will need to get him to sign and stamp another form from the NDSS so you can continue to get the strips for $1.30.

    You can get a Accu_Chek Performa meter which comes with a lancing device and one six lancet magazine. This is on special at most major pharmacies such as Blooms for $40.00 with $40.00 cash back offer. The catch with this is that the strips cost $50.00 for a 100 pack to buy over the counter, this is why I suggested joining the NDSA first so you can get the subsidy.
     
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    #3 Tipetoo, Oct 31, 2016 at 9:47 AM
    Last edited: Oct 31, 2016
  4. Doriand

    Doriand Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi Silvia,
    I'm Dorian from Central Victoria and welcome to this site. The first thing to do, as Tipetoo suggests, sign up with NDSS (National Diabetes Services Scheme) so you can get discounted strips and some chemists even give out free blood testing machines (but you still have to buy the test strips). The next thing to consider is how to control your blood sugar through diet, exercise and medication. Get as much information about type 2 and this web site is a good start. Once Medicare consider your condition as chronic (as it always is) you will be entitled to a number of free consultations with dieticians, podiatrists, opticians, diabetic educators etc. You may have side effects with metformin (crook guts) or suffer 'hypo's' (low blood sugar levels) so carry lollies just in case.
    Some people have that "it's unfair" attitude when being diagnosed with Diabetes (I know I did) but it forces people to look after themselves by eating better, exercising and end up being fitter, lighter and be a lot better than before.
    Best wishes and take care ...
     
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  5. daisy1

    daisy1 Type 2 · Legend
    Retired Moderator

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    @slinkimalinki

    Hello Silvia and welcome to the forum :) Here is the information we give to new members which I hope you will find useful. Ask more questions when you need to and someone will be able to help.


    BASIC INFORMATION FOR NEWLY DIAGNOSED DIABETICS

    Diabetes is the general term to describe people who have blood that is sweeter than normal. A number of different types of diabetes exist.

    A diagnosis of diabetes tends to be a big shock for most of us. It’s far from the end of the world though and on this forum you'll find well over 220,000 people who are demonstrating this.

    On the forum we have found that with the number of new people being diagnosed with diabetes each day, sometimes the NHS is not being able to give all the advice it would perhaps like to deliver - particularly with regards to people with type 2 diabetes.

    The role of carbohydrate

    Carbohydrates are a factor in diabetes because they ultimately break down into sugar (glucose) within our blood. We then need enough insulin to either convert the blood sugar into energy for our body, or to store the blood sugar as body fat.

    If the amount of carbohydrate we take in is more than our body’s own (or injected) insulin can cope with, then our blood sugar will rise.

    The bad news

    Research indicates that raised blood sugar levels over a period of years can lead to organ damage, commonly referred to as diabetic complications.

    The good news

    People on the forum here have shown that there is plenty of opportunity to keep blood sugar levels from going too high. It’s a daily task but it’s within our reach and it’s well worth the effort.

    Controlling your carbs

    The info below is primarily aimed at people with type 2 diabetes, however, it may also be of benefit for other types of diabetes as well.

    There are two approaches to controlling your carbs:

    • Reduce your carbohydrate intake
    • Choose ‘better’ carbohydrates
    Reduce your carbohydrates

    A large number of people on this forum have chosen to reduce the amount of carbohydrates they eat as they have found this to be an effective way of improving (lowering) their blood sugar levels.

    The carbohydrates which tend to have the most pronounced effect on blood sugar levels tend to be starchy carbohydrates such as rice, pasta, bread, potatoes and similar root vegetables, flour based products (pastry, cakes, biscuits, battered food etc) and certain fruits.

    Choosing better carbohydrates

    The low glycaemic index diet is often favoured by healthcare professionals but some people with diabetes find that low GI does not help their blood sugar enough and may wish to cut out these foods altogether.

    Read more on carbohydrates and diabetes.

    Over 145,000 people have taken part in the Low Carb Program - a free 10 week structured education course that is helping people lose weight and reduce medication dependency by explaining the science behind carbs, insulin and GI.

    Eating what works for you

    Different people respond differently to different types of food. What works for one person may not work so well for another. The best way to see which foods are working for you is to test your blood sugar with a glucose meter.

    To be able to see what effect a particular type of food or meal has on your blood sugar is to do a test before the meal and then test after the meal. A test 2 hours after the meal gives a good idea of how your body has reacted to the meal.

    The blood sugar ranges recommended by NICE are as follows:

    Blood glucose ranges for type 2 diabetes
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 8.5 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (adults)
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 9 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (children)
    • Before meals: 4 to 8 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 10 mmol/l
    However, those that are able to, may wish to keep blood sugar levels below the NICE after meal targets.

    Access to blood glucose test strips

    The NICE guidelines suggest that people newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes should be offered:

    • structured education to every person and/or their carer at and around the time of diagnosis, with annual reinforcement and review
    • self-monitoring of plasma glucose to a person newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes only as an integral part of his or her self-management education

    Therefore both structured education and self-monitoring of blood glucose should be offered to people with type 2 diabetes. Read more on getting access to blood glucose testing supplies.

    You may also be interested to read questions to ask at a diabetic clinic.

    Note: This post has been edited from Sue/Ken's post to include up to date information.
     
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  6. Doriand

    Doriand Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    One thing I forgot to mention, once you are signed up with NDSS, you can only get your discounted diabetes supplies through NDSS accredited chemists.Don't worry, about 80% of chemists are, and you'll see the NDSS sign out the front. Use @daisy1's post as your starting guide for information and go through the different forums like diets, medication etc. There are heaps of Aussies on this site, even though it's UK based and I have found this site like an Aladdin's Cave of information.
     
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  7. Tipetoo

    Tipetoo Type 2 · Expert

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    Further to what I said last night, I made a mistake on the price of strips. They are $1.60 per 100, the non NDSS price is still around the $50.00+ mark. :arghh:
     
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  8. snowleopard

    snowleopard Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi there Aussies. I'm coming out to Melbourne in a couple of weeks. I will be bringing plenty of supplies but there's always a risk of loss in transit so I wonder if anyone can advise on the availability of the stuff I need if I run short while I'm there and what it will cost me. Lantus, NovoRapid, Omnicam needles and Accuchek Aviva test strips. Obviously I would need a local prescription for the insulin but what about the hardware?
     
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  9. Tipetoo

    Tipetoo Type 2 · Expert

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    Split your supplies up in different bags.

    All of your stuff is available here, bring your scripts from your GP needed for the medication as far as I'm aware they are valid here.

    As I posted in my first post in this thread, and corrected in my second that's the rough price for Accu_Check Performa strips. So Aviva strips would be around the same price range.

    You should have been in Melbourne today as the race that stops the nation is on at Flemington - Melbourne Cup Day.
     
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  10. Indy51

    Indy51 Type 2 · Expert

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    My understanding is that newly diagnosed will be allowed cost price strips by the NDSS for 6 months, after that you need a GP to agree to continue receiving them. Agree with all the advice given above about how important testing is for getting control - if you don't know which foods spike your BG, it will make things that much harder.
     
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  11. Cat0409_

    Cat0409_ Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Love my freestyle freedom lite. It only needs the tiniest drop of blood.
    My freestyle optimum new needs a massive amount of blood compared title but I use it for ketone o the a weekly basis.
    You will find many chemists have meters that you buy and then get a rebate back from the company.
    You can also google free meters. Freestyle are usually available free over the net or thru ringing them.

    Its a good idea if you need to check your BS before driving to always carry a second meter in your handbag.
     
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  12. Tipetoo

    Tipetoo Type 2 · Expert

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  13. therower

    therower Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi @Doriand . Slightly off topic but you have just doubled the amount of people I now know named Dorian.
    Until recently I knew only one Dorian, my big old lump of a brother in law.
    But now I can say that there is another Dorian out there albeit on the other side of the world.
    World seems a little bit smaller, nice to know you. Tony Leicester England.
     
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  14. Doriand

    Doriand Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi Tony,
    Pleased to 'meet' you! I have asked my parents when I was a kid who or what I was named after and they said it was from an Oscar Wilde novel "The Picture Of Dorian Grey". There have been times when I thought it would be nice to have a common name, but after reading about celebrities naming their kids really weird names it's not so bad. A few comes to mind: Moon unit Zappa, daughter of Frank Zappa a 70's rock figure, Suri, Tom & Nicole's kids which from memory is a Japanese term for prostitute! A trend which is going on in Australia is for parents to name their kids common names but different spelling like: Jaxxon, Johdee Tonneee etc What these parents don't realise is their kids have to grow up with their names until they are old enough to change it !:arghh:
     
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  15. therower

    therower Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    @Doriand .
    Hi Dorian. Thanks for replying, and hey if you would have had a common name I doubt we would have " met".
    As for the trend for unusual names goes let me tell you the names of my Dorian's grandkids.
    Grandson named Morley Beau.
    Granddaughter named Clementine Marmalade.
    It definitely makes you wonder where the idea's come from.:):):)
     
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