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Back to honeymoon period

Discussion in 'Diabetes Discussions' started by Triscornia, Mar 12, 2019.

  1. Triscornia

    Triscornia · Well-Known Member

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    My son who is just 15 was diagnosed with type1 in December 2018 and was in honeymoon period until 4 th Feb when he didn’t feel well and was admitted to hospital where he began his insulin journey. He got an ear infection from the hospital and after finishing antibiotics he felt better and we had to reduce his insulin dosage( his dosage was not much to begin with). For a couple of days now he doesn’t need the insulin and apparently he is back on honeymoon period and his levels are normal. We just have to keep checking his levels but wondering how long this will last.
    Has anyone else experienced this?
     
  2. Juicyj

    Juicyj Type 1 · Moderator
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    Hello and welcome @Triscornia

    I had a brief honeymoon after diagnosis, it only lasted around 6 months and to be honest it didn't help control much as my levels were all over the shop, so it was a relief when it was over and I knew I wouldn't be sporadically squirting extra insulin into the mix. A consultant once told me they can last up to a year and although it helps early days with insulin administration and getting used to the regime no one knows how long they last as each individual is unique.
     
  3. Triscornia

    Triscornia · Well-Known Member

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    Thanks. I am relieved at the moment as I can sleep through the night without having to check his levels. When he was on insulin I was checking every 3 hours and twice had to wake him up to take sugar. It’s very frustrating this disease. So happy though he has the freestyle on his arm so I no longer have to try to get blood from his thin fingers. I was hoping this was all a due to growth spurts as his is over 170 tall and only 40 kilos but my Dr said it’s not the case. Just me not accepting. Big shock and came from no where. Not in family. Someone told me that also a shock can bring diabetes on. Did u hear of that?
     
  4. Juicyj

    Juicyj Type 1 · Moderator
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    Hello @Triscornia Theres many theories about what brings about a type 1 diagnosis and yes I have heard shock can be one trigger or stress, illness, and pretty much every new case would be a shock, I too was shocked when I got diagnosed as I've had a pretty healthy life, it took me a while to get over it and it's natural to feel many emotions as a result such as anger, denial, bargaining, depression. Coming to terms and accepting it means you can start to move on with your life and regain a sense of normality, I always recommend people to read 'think like a pancreas' written by a type 1, getting as knowledgable as possible means you are better equipped at coping with the many events that type 1 can throw your way. Also do talk about how you are feeling, it's important to feel supported.
     
  5. Triscornia

    Triscornia · Well-Known Member

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    Thank you for responding. I am currently reading the book although I would like a more simple book stating some standard facts. When we left the hospital it was like when we were leaving the hospital with our first newborn. No idea what we were doing and no idea what to expect. We learn as we are going along but a small simple book would have helped us. Talking to other people who are in similar situations help but others have no idea what it is like. Thanks again.
     
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  6. Juicyj

    Juicyj Type 1 · Moderator
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    I have to admit I felt like an alien when I was diagnosed, as if I didn't really know myself and how I was going to respond, a lot of tears came and my life felt suspended, I never thought I'd feel 'normal' again and it helped talking to more experienced t1's to see that it was possible to live a normal life. In fact it's taught me to challenege myself more and do more than before, which I have done, I did a sky dive, walked the Cotwolsds way, raise money for charity now, run regularly and hope to do a half marathon in a few months, I ride a road bike, still ski, I just do all of it with a plan in how to manage insulin and glucose levels, which sometimes works and sometimes doesn't, either way it's a learning curve all the time.
     
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