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Becoming a doctor?

Discussion in 'Jobs and Employment' started by yayy, Mar 27, 2017.

  1. yayy

    yayy Type 1 · Member

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    Hi!
    So I really, really want to become a doctor. I actually believe that diabetes is a part of that because it has showed me what miracles medicine can do and all that. But can I be a doctor if I have diabetes? I mean I probably can't become a surgeon or something (or can I?) since you probably can't "pause" the surgery just to fix your blood sugars but what about other doctors? I really don't know what else I'd do with my life if I couldn't be a doctor. I want to help others since I've been helped too and medicine saved my life.
     
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  2. catapillar

    catapillar Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    There are plenty of type 1 doctors.

    The presenter of the podcast "diabetes daily grind" is type 1 and in medical school. They had a few interesting programmes about what that's like.

    There are plenty of medical specialisms that don't involve endurance surgeries. Although a type 1 on the right basal, and maybe giving a CGM to a scrub nurse, should be perfectly capable of performing endurance surgeries.
     
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  3. EllsKBells

    EllsKBells Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    @yayy Hi!

    I too really wanted to be a doctor when I was diagnosed, a cardiothoracic surgeon, actually, and it soon became clear that becoming a surgeon wouldn't be possible because of the whole blood sugar thing. At the time, a GP told me there was no reason I shouldn't become a doctor, but I didn't want to 'settle' if that makes sense. Something to bear in mind is the impact that shift work, while you are training at least, might have on you. I can't think of anyone off the top of my head, but there are several people here who work shifts, and say it does affect their blood glucose, so you may want to look into a pump.

    ARe you in the UK? If so, the best thing to do might be to contact the GMC and ask them. I've looked through the 'fitness to practice' documentation at length, and whilst they refer to medical conditions, it isn't in enough detail to provide a definitive answer.

    Good luck!
     
  4. Dairygrade

    Dairygrade Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi yayy not sure about becoming a doctor with diabetes i think it could throw up a few problems i haven't met a doctor with diabetes but if you're interested in caring why not see if you could become a health care assistant working in nursing homes i myself started in this field and worked my way up to a male rgn and i did it for 25yrs working as agency staff in hos etc and most care homes give on site training as you will need to get an n.v.q level3 in care and work your way up and i done all this being type 1 on insulin so good luck to you if you need any more advice about this please let me know on forum or private message me .
     
  5. noblehead

    noblehead Type 1 · Guru
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    Just go for it, study hard and live your dreams.
     
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  6. Tipetoo

    Tipetoo Type 2 · Expert

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    When we lived in Mt. Isa there was a GP in the practice who had Parkinsons. The only constrains on him was that he was not allowed deliver babies any more.

    He was a good doctor though.
     
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  7. AndBreathe

    AndBreathe I reversed my Type 2 · Master
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    Yayy - There is at least one T1 who is a current, practising GP. Have a watch of this:

     
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  8. tim2000s

    tim2000s Type 1 · Expert
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    There are many practising Type 1 doctors. I know a fair few of them who just happen to be endocrinologists too. In the UK I know of four or five and in the US I'm aware of another bunch.

    Ignore what anyone has said above about it being difficult, shift work and every thing else that goes with training to be a medic. If you want to do it, you can, and there is absolutely nothing stopping you. Always remember, @yayy, that it is you that are in control of your diabetes, not the other way around, so you determine what you do in life.

    Good luck in applying to medical school and going through the training. Your life is in your hands and it's all about the choices that you make from here!
     
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  9. BeccyB

    BeccyB Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Totally agree with @tim2000s - and more Type 1 doctors can only be a good thing for the rest of us IMO

    Loads of luck, and keep us updated @yayy

    Edited to add: I assume being a surgeon would just need regular checks / CGM and hypo treatment on hand. I can picture it..."scalpel....suction.....jelly baby...." :doctor:
     
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    #9 BeccyB, Mar 28, 2017 at 9:21 AM
    Last edited: Mar 28, 2017
  10. yayy

    yayy Type 1 · Member

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    @catapillar Thank you very much and I'll check that podcast out, it will probably be helpful!
    @EllsKBells Oh aaa I hope you found some other career for you that you like :( I once wanted to become a surgeon but now I think I'd rather do something else. Thank you a lot, I've thought about shift work and its impact before and it will require work but I'm ready for that
     
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  11. Sid Bonkers

    Sid Bonkers Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Id have thought that if they let diabetics aim articulated lorries down our motorways and also let diabetics fly jumbo jets above our heads they would let you have a go at whipping out some ones appendix.

    Seriously thats a great goal to have and I wish you all the luck with your time spent in doctoring school ;)
     
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  12. yayy

    yayy Type 1 · Member

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    Hey again! Thanks for replying everyone, it really helped and I feel more motivated, being a doctor is what I want to do. I'll still talk about this with my diabetes nurse someday but I just needed some opinions from other diabetics :)
     
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  13. EllsKBells

    EllsKBells Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    @yayy I would definitely agree with @Dairygrade about getting some experience. Most hospitals, or nursing homes, or centres like Disability Challengers will take on volunteers, just so when you apply you show the admissions team that you really know what you are getting into, and you have the experience of working in that sort of environment. It's a great vocation. Definitely talk to your DSN about it, and also next time you see your consultant, depending on your age of course (!), ask about shadowing them for a while.

    Personally, I choose to see it as having given me the opportunity to look at what I really wanted to do. So I'm now finishing my undergraduate in Biochemsitry, and will be starting a Masters in Neuropathology in the autumn, which I am really excited about.

    Diabetes shouldn't stop you doing anything. As I see it, this greedy beast has taken enough from us already, it really doesn't need anymore. With pumps, CGMs, and the closed loop systems that are currently under study, hopefully one day we will have just as much freedom as anybody else. Go for it!
     
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  14. HeartBreakHigh

    HeartBreakHigh · Member

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    I do love a good thread dug up from the past. Though the original posted hasn´t logged in here for close on 3 years. o_O

    Related to this thread. Does anyone know if there is an actual list anywhere of what jobs a type 1 diabetic legally can´t do (and in which countries, as I presume the law is not the same in all)?
     
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  15. searley

    searley Type 1 · Moderator
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    So long as you have the qualifications and you manage your diabetes then I don't see why you can't be either a doctor or a surgeon

    I'm only a hgv driver.. Mostly motorway but can't just stop to fix a hypo... So you make sure you don't have them... And I've not had a single one when driving

    There is now tech to help like pumps with dexcom etc

    Besides the timescale of training might mean by the time you qualify new tech may be avail be to help further..

    Don't dismiss and idea just because you are T1 in modern society we are to be given equal opertunity... It's upto you to prove you can do it

    So how much do you want it???
     
  16. UK T1

    UK T1 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Not sure if there is an official list but I remember being told I wouldn't be able to join the army, drive trains professionally or work on cruise ships when I was diagnosed. Hadn't intended on doing those things so I've never looked into it further! This was also a while ago so could very well have changed since.
     
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