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Blood test results have come back - 1 abnormal result

Discussion in 'Diabetes Discussions' started by starry-night-sky, Apr 15, 2018.

  1. starry-night-sky

    starry-night-sky Other · Member

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    Hi everyone, I just wanted to post an update on my situation. So yesterday I got my results of my blood tests I've had recently.

    For my hba1c I had in February at my first Endo appointment, the result is 37 mmol/L.

    I had a 2 hour OGTT in March. The fasting level is 5.1 which the letter says is normal, but the 2 hour result is 12.2 which the letter says is abnormal.

    It also says 'The 2 hour glucose level is abnormal, however, we cannot make a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes based on this single reading, especially in the absence of symptoms (excessive thirst, increased urination and unexplained weight loss) The other diabetes test hba1c was normal at 37 mmol/L, I therefore suggest a repeat glucose test, either fasting or random test at your GP surgery, and the diagnosis of type 2 diabetes can only be made with two abnormal glucose readings.'

    I do not have increased thirst, urination or weight loss, but as I have told every Doctor I have seen about this, I get lightheaded when I'm hungry, I can get shaky hands when hungry, (I test myself and my levels are below 4 when I feel like this) I get very tired after eating certain foods, I get numb and painful sensations in my feet and I woke up one morning with very blurred vision, so I don't know why they put 'in the absence of symptoms'.

    That is my second hba1c I have had, both of them are in the normal range. All of my fasting readings I do at home in the morning are in the non diabetic range. The only diabetic readings I get are from post prandial tests. (I have had 11.5 and 12.5 on my meter)

    My question is, can the doctor just do a normal finger prick test, and based on my symptoms and the 12.2 reading, diagnose me from the high finger prick level? Given the choice, I would rather they do that, as I had to have a cannula fitted for my OGTT. I am incredibly squeamish, I am not good with blood tests but having a cannula fitted is more scary for me and it made me cry.
     
  2. cz_dave

    cz_dave Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    My OGTT test result was just above 12 mmol and that qualified me as diabetic. Perhaps if you present your meter with a number of high postprandial readings, it could be sufficient. However, your endo should have you undergo another blood test: focused on antibodies, to decide whether you are type 1 or 2.
     
  3. DCUKMod

    DCUKMod I reversed my Type 2 · Master
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    The issue with a number of your symptoms is they are also symptoms of several other conditions, and not necessarily evidence of anything at all.

    When I am hungry, my levels will often be under 4, as will they be for many, many non-diabetics. That you are feeling shaky could be indicative of an issue, or just mean you're very hungry.

    Your Doc can do a finger prick test on you, but his reading wouldn't be any more likely t be an accurate guide than yours. All meters have an accepted level of variance from the actual, plus the finger prick test tests capillary blood, as opposed to venous blood.

    The reason a cannula is routinely used for an OGTT is to minimise the number of punctures you have. Most people find the cannula more comfortable that having both arms punctured on the same day.

    That you are on the radar with a sluggish insulin response suggests they'll want to keep an eye on you. Have you been told when they will next look to check in on things?

    Definitely go back in the meantime, should you start to lose weigh without trying, start to pass loads of water (I mean loads!) or feel unwell.
     
  4. starry-night-sky

    starry-night-sky Other · Member

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    No I have not been told they will check on it. You can see what the letter says, that they recommend I go back to my GP for further testing. That is it I’m afraid.

    And I didn’t think that non diabetic people can get readings under 4, and get dizzy and shaky regularly? Is it the case that they can? Me and my partner mostly eat the same things at the same times and he never has the same problems as me.
     
  5. DCUKMod

    DCUKMod I reversed my Type 2 · Master
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    Being in the 4s, and lower is very usual, but they rarely know, because they don't test. The dizzying and shaking aren't too usual, but could be due to be a few things - including lower blood pressure, for example.

    Did they only do a starting, then 2 hour test, with nothing in the middle? Sometimes OGTTs are done with additional interim tests, like at the 1 hour point, for example.

    They're suggesting you go back to your doctor for further advice, and that sounds like a good plan.

    If you are convinced your issue is metabolic (and of course it might well be), I suggest you begin or continue with accurate data collection. By that I mean keeping a detailed food diary, alongside your finger prick tests (bearing in mind to note when recording a blood score when you had last eaten, and what it was, plus alongside those details how you felt at the time.

    That way you could see a trend developing or not, but could be helpful in terms of any investigations undertaken.
     
  6. starry-night-sky

    starry-night-sky Other · Member

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    Yes they just did a fasting level and the 2 hour level.

    I just wanted to ask another question too. Am I right in thinking that type 1s tend to have higher levels than type 2s? Type 1s have to take insulin to lower their levels? Both my hba1cs were healthy and all my fasting levels are non diabetic, it’s just my readings after certain foods that can go high. So if I do get diagnosed with anything, is it more likely they will recommend it to be diet and exercise controlled? I know nobody on here can diagnose me but just wasn’t sure if insulin is only for people with high levels on every test? Sorry if it’s a stupid question, it’s all new to me.
     
  7. LittleGreyCat

    LittleGreyCat Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    No such thing as a stupid question.

    You are having possible hypo symptoms coupled with BG readings below 4; this does seem to suggest that you might be having a mild hypo. However T2 diabetics who are not on insulin or insulin boosting medication are even less likely than non-diabetics to have a hypo.

    How much below 4, and how long do you have to go without eating to be hungry enough for these symptoms?

    You aren't showing the classic symptoms of diabetes; so your GP seems to be correct. Your slower response to clearing the glucose in your test may suggest the first steps towards pre-diabetes but as already said it could also be many other things.

    Realistically, feeling a bit shaky when you are hungry is not usually an indication of diabetes. Something is going on that is worrying you and you should continue to investigate.
     
  8. Sam50

    Sam50 Don't have diabetes · Well-Known Member

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    hi @starry-night-sky I joined the forum to support Hubby who is T2 (I'm not diabetic) but in answer to your question, my BG can often be 2.9-3 and that makes me feel shaky. Generally I just need to eat more. Good luck with getting to the bottom of your issues x
     
  9. DCUKMod

    DCUKMod I reversed my Type 2 · Master
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    If your levels go wonky after "certain foods", you may have a sensitivity to one or more of those foods. Have you tried cutting them out of your diet for a while?
     
  10. Lamont D

    Lamont D Reactive hypoglycemia · Master

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    I have to be careful here because I don't want you to be worried or try and diagnose what is going on.
    As someone has already said, it could be metabolic or hormonal.
    Or something entirely different.
    But those symptoms, will be a lot like a condition where you blood glucose levels fluctuate because of some imbalance in your blood.
    For instance, too much glucose, not enough insulin, or too much insulin.
    A normal reading of fasting blood levels doesn't mean that there is nothing wrong. Whereas a spike into double figures from normal, does mean that there is something.
    I have a form of hypoglycaemia, my hba1c and fasting blood levels are in normal range, but if I have too many carbs (not much) I spike into double figures.
    I get the same symptoms and more, if not in control.

    I have had many oral glucose tolerance tests, but all mine are over four to five hours, because, two hours won't find what happens after that, they are looking to see if I go hypo, usually between three to four hours after. These eOGTTs are used to eliminate other conditions, if the doctors are looking for something other than diabetes, other tests will be needed.
    It's a pity they didn't do an extended OGTT!
    Someone who is non diabetic can have hypos. I do and I'm not diabetic!

    I would recommend you asking your GP to refer you to a specialist endocrinologist, he/she will get you the tests necessary to find a true diagnosis.

    In the meantime, eat small low carb meals every three hours to halt the symptoms.
    Hunger and wanting to eat everything is a symptom of hypoglycaemia.
     
  11. Arab Horse

    Arab Horse Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    @starry-night-sky "I do not have increased thirst, urination or weight loss".

    I was diagnosed as full blown diabetes (glucose of 18.6mMol/L, HbA1c of 10.4) when I went for my free NHS health check. I was gobsmacked as I had no symptoms at all so you don't need to have symptoms to have T2 diabetes.
     
  12. DavidGrahamJones

    DavidGrahamJones Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    As DCUK says "The issue with a number of your symptoms is they are also symptoms of several other conditions, and not necessarily evidence of anything at all".

    In the case of my wife who has similar symptoms, she needs her carbs/sugar, simple as that. Or should I say that when she gets those feelings, eating something sugary is the cure. She's quite active, playing tennis at least three times a week, summer and winter, so needs the energy.
     
  13. NicoleC1971

    NicoleC1971 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Sounds like your glucagon (bg raising) and insulin (bg lowering) are slightly out of whack and that all other options should be ruled out. In the meantime can you make notes on when you get those hypo symptoms and what was eaten before hand? (some foods trigger something called reactive hypogleacemia) Or whether you were at all stressed and had an adrenalin spike etc. And the bg readings. This might give you some data to go back to an endocrinologist with. I hope you get a clearer idea of whether you need to make some dietary alterations or whether this is something unrelated and not of concern from a blood sugar pov.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
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