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Can I join the club

Discussion in 'Greetings and Introductions' started by Martinjd, Nov 13, 2015.

  1. Martinjd

    Martinjd Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi I'm Martin, I've had regular blood checks over the last few years due to having high blood pressure, I'm told my level has recently gone from 48 to 63 and so now am type 2 diabetic.
    I'm not good at asking questions but I did take in that I should cut down on carbs, that surprised me I thought I would just have to go without sweets and buiscuits. I will ask things on here that have been asked many times before sorry.
     
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  2. martsnow

    martsnow Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi and welcome to the forum. I have only been a member for six weeks and it has proved an invaluable source of support and information

    It is only through asking questions that we learn, and remember there is no such think as a daft question

    Mart
     
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  3. martsnow

    martsnow Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    BASIC INFORMATION FOR NEWLY DIAGNOSED DIABETICS

    Diabetes is the general term to describe people who have blood that is sweeter than normal. A number of different types of diabetes exist.

    A diagnosis of diabetes tends to be a big shock for most of us. It’s far from the end of the world though and on this forum you’ll find over 150,000 people who are demonstrating this.

    On the forum we have found that with the number of new people being diagnosed with diabetes each day, sometimes the NHS is not being able to give all the advice it would perhaps like to deliver - particularly with regards to people with type 2 diabetes.

    The role of carbohydrate

    Carbohydrates are a factor in diabetes because they ultimately break down into sugar (glucose) within our blood. We then need enough insulin to either convert the blood sugar into energy for our body, or to store the blood sugar as body fat.

    If the amount of carbohydrate we take in is more than our body’s own (or injected) insulin can cope with, then our blood sugar will rise.

    The bad news

    Research indicates that raised blood sugar levels over a period of years can lead to organ damage, commonly referred to as diabetic complications.

    The good news

    People on the forum here have shown that there is plenty of opportunity to keep blood sugar levels from going too high. It’s a daily task but it’s within our reach and it’s well worth the effort.

    Controlling your carbs

    The info below is primarily aimed at people with type 2 diabetes, however, it may also be of benefit for other types of diabetes as well.
    There are two approaches to controlling your carbs:

    • Reduce your carbohydrate intake
    • Choose ‘better’ carbohydrates

    Reduce your carbohydrates

    A large number of people on this forum have chosen to reduce the amount of carbohydrates they eat as they have found this to be an effective way of improving (lowering) their blood sugar levels.

    The carbohydrates which tend to have the most pronounced effect on blood sugar levels tend to be starchy carbohydrates such as rice, pasta, bread, potatoes and similar root vegetables, flour based products (pastry, cakes, biscuits, battered food etc) and certain fruits.

    Choosing better carbohydrates

    Another option is to replace ‘white carbohydrates’ (such as white bread, white rice, white flour etc) with whole grain varieties. The idea behind having whole grain varieties is that the carbohydrates get broken down slower than the white varieties –and these are said to have a lower glycaemic index.
    http://www.diabetes.co.uk/food/diabetes-and-whole-grains.html

    The low glycaemic index diet is often favoured by healthcare professionals but some people with diabetes find that low GI does not help their blood sugar enough and may wish to cut out these foods altogether.

    Read more on carbohydrates and diabetes

    Eating what works for you

    Different people respond differently to different types of food. What works for one person may not work so well for another. The best way to see which foods are working for you is to test your blood sugar with a glucose meter.

    To be able to see what effect a particular type of food or meal has on your blood sugar is to do a test before the meal and then test after the meal. A test 2 hours after the meal gives a good idea of how your body has reacted to the meal.

    The blood sugar ranges recommended by NICE are as follows:

    Blood glucose ranges for type 2 diabetes
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 8.5 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (adults)
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 9 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (children)
    • Before meals: 4 to 8 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 10 mmol/l
    However, those that are able to, may wish to keep blood sugar levels below the NICE after meal targets.

    Access to blood glucose test strips

    The NICE guidelines suggest that people newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes should be offered:

    • structured education to every person and/or their carer at and around the time of diagnosis, with annual reinforcement and review
    • self-monitoring of plasma glucose to a person newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes only as an integral part of his or her self-management education

    Therefore both structured education and self-monitoring of blood glucose should be offered to people with type 2 diabetes. Read more on getting access to bloodglucose testing supplies.

    You may also be interested to read questions to ask at a diabetic clinic

    Note: This post has been edited from Sue/Ken's post to include up to date information.

    http://www.diabetes.co.uk/forum/threads/basic-information-for-newly-diagnosed-diabetics.17088/
     
  4. Patricia21

    Patricia21 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hello and welcome.
     
  5. Martinjd

    Martinjd Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the welcome, at the diabetic clinic I was told by the nurse that she would recommend to my GP that he prescribes me tablets to control things, she also gave advice about carbs but did not mention testing myself, it seems strange as I won't be getting my blood tested at the clinic again for six months. Should I buy a meter myself, if yes which one do people in the know recommend. I would like to test to see if the changes I am making are helping.
     
  6. martsnow

    martsnow Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    It is always useful to have your own meter. This way you can keep an eye on Blood Glucose levels, and see which foods you can eat without spiking your BG levels too much

    I am one of the lucky people on this forum who got a free meter from my GP and gets 100 test strips per month on repeat prescription

    Those who are not so lucky opt for the SD code free meter due to the fact that the test strips are reasonably priced at £6.99 for 50. This meter has proved to be cheap and reliable for fellow forum members

    Other meters test strips can cost up to well over thirty pounds for 50 strips

    http://www.homehealth-uk.com/medical/blood_glucose_monitor_testing.htm

    Hope this is of help

    Mart
     
    #6 martsnow, Nov 13, 2015 at 7:43 PM
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 13, 2015
  7. Martinjd

    Martinjd Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Great help thanks Mart
     
  8. martsnow

    martsnow Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    It is a postcode lottery as to whether you can get a meter through your GP. Even where I live in the West Midlands it can vary from surgery to surgery in the same town

    Mart
     
  9. poohtiggy

    poohtiggy Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi and welcome to the forum or 'the club'
    Sorry but everyone (non diabetic) thinks it's just about sweets & biscuits but it's about a lot of other stuff too such as Carbohydrate, until you get some kind of control/reduction in levels ditch Bread Rice Pasta and Potatoes they are all very higb carb. You definately need a meter to keep an eye on your BG levels, I would be surprised if your GP issued one because they don't give them to type 2's. A lot of members use one called Codefree a starter pack costs around £12.99 you get the meter, a few strips and about five lancets. This monitor is so popular because the strips are the cheapest and you will use a lot to begin with. It's available from Home Health online the strips are I think £6 for 50 but if you order more you get discount ie: 5 packs for £25 with this code264086 you put that number in at Checkout and don't forget to tick the box which asks 'are you diabetic it means you don't pay VAT, they deliver in a few days
    You need to test before your first bite then again after 2hours the recommended levels are 4.5 and 8.5 test everything you eat but definately no cake biscuits sweets and be careful with fruit it's another sugar culprit. Full fat dairy products like yogurt, cheese and butter are better than the low fat which contain sugar. Shout if you need help, always somebody here to answer queries . It sounds daunting but once you get used to testing you will see a difference quite quickly. Hope this helps
     
    #9 poohtiggy, Nov 13, 2015 at 7:53 PM
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 13, 2015
  10. Martinjd

    Martinjd Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Should I get a meter reading mmol/L or mg/dL.
     
  11. Robbity

    Robbity Type 2 · Expert

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    If you're in the UK we use mmol/L. Normally the country you're in will be selling meters using the correct units. But as we also have many international members you'll see mg/dL figures quoted in many posts here too.

    If you're refused a meter on prescription which most type 2 diabetics are :( (again UK) the one to buy is the SDCocdefree as this has the cheapest test strips - they sell direct or via ebay or Amazon UK. But it's worth asking as some health areas are more generous than others, and I think if you use insulin you may well be entitled to prescriptions for meter and strips anyway so check!

    Robbity
     
  12. Martinjd

    Martinjd Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    After reading the information for Newley diagnosed diabetics I've guessed it's mmol/L
     
  13. Martinjd

    Martinjd Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Thanks Robbity
     
  14. Liam1955

    Liam1955 Type 2 · Master

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    Hello Martinjd and welcome to the Forum. If in doubt about something with Diabetes? Just ask, there's a lot of understanding people with a wealth of knowledge on Diabetes here. Regards, William.
     
  15. HypoBand UK

    HypoBand UK Other · Well-Known Member

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    Hello @Martinjd welcome to this amazing forum where no question, is viewed as a silly question.
     
  16. Martinjd

    Martinjd Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Thanks William
     
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