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Can someone help explain???

Discussion in 'Reactive Hypoglycemia' started by Shaj07, Dec 14, 2019.

  1. Lamont D

    Lamont D Reactive hypoglycemia · Master

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    Further to answers already explaining normal hba1c levels for Rh ers. A fasting hba1c test should show normal levels if it is a true RH diagnosis. But as with most people, we all have other conditions, different symptoms. So if you have T2 with RH, and you still have too much carbs, sugar, then it is natural to get over normal hba1c levels because of the diabetic diagnosis.
     
    • Informative Informative x 1
  2. Shaj07

    Shaj07 · Member

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    thank you! I’m not too familiar with mol, as I’m in the US but I can look up the conversion. My a1c came back 5.1% with avgBG at 99.7mg. Which, of course textbook wise, it seems great. I just wish I felt as great as my lab lol.
     
  3. Shaj07

    Shaj07 · Member

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    Ah okay got it! That makes sense. Because there is not total insulin resistance just abnormality in how it responds. However if the abnormality persists or worsens from time and/or diet then that’s when T2 could* possibly happen. Is that correct?
     
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  4. Lamont D

    Lamont D Reactive hypoglycemia · Master

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    I don't think you can nail it down to that extent.
    I would imagine and through my own experience, until insulin resistance and high circulating insulin levels come back down to normal levels can you measure how abnormal your insulin response can be. Because my initial insulin response is weak, and my insulin overshoot is too much, if I have carbs, then my insulin levels, insulin resistance will alter. The dietary changes are necessary to help you with not only insulin but with other hormonal responses you may trigger.
    Because my natural fasting levels, despite how much insulin resistance and circulating insulin has always been at normal levels, this is what confused doctors for over a decade. They didn't have a clue! When I was initially (mis)diagnosed prediabetic then (mis)diagnosed T2. My glucose levels were high, obviously in diabetic range, but because at that time, my symptoms were very much typically T2. My insulin levels were never tested, I definitely had hyperinsulinaemia.

    I think I had five eOGTT tests, first two to help my endocrinologist understand what was going on.
    The third was after going low carb for three weeks, but not as low carb as I have been.
    The fourth was after diagnosis, to see how after a seventy two hours fasting test, because of weight loss and a lower carb diet effected going hypo, it didn't. I also think because of despite my complete change in my health within a couple of months this was a precursor to my fifth eOGTT.
    My fifth and final eOGTT, was to test a Gliptin and see if that altered my initial insulin response, (it did) which should improve my likelihood of going hypo (it didn't!) But it did help with the after effects of a hypo. That was my last full blown hypo, as well.

    Final thoughts, if you can get your balance of foods right and avoid those foods which causes the trigger, you should get healthier and the symptoms should reduce accordingly. But only a total disregard of how your body copes with carbs, will ultimately end in health problems, endocrine metabolism problems, digestive system problems, organ function problems and probably Diabetes! High insulin levels will cause severe health problems, and because they are never tested, this is one of the major factors in the cause of prediabetes, T2 diabetes and and other metabolic syndrome conditions.

    RH is all about food and how your insulin response reacts.

    I hope that helps, but I fear it won't. It is quite complicated!

    Best wishes
     
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  5. Auto E

    Auto E Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    Wow Lamont you have sure been through a lot. You have had to be so proactive; I can imagine that your journey has been exhausting. I sure appreciate that you help out others on this forum.
     
  6. Lamont D

    Lamont D Reactive hypoglycemia · Master

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    Thanks!
    Not being humble, but I did go through a lot, mostly not being aware of how ill I actually was! I got fobbed off from a lot of doctors, dsns, and even an endocrinologist.
    None had a clue! But I'm aware that the knowledge about RH is very limited and most of the doctors were stumped about what I was going through!
    They assumed that it was T2 and I wasn't taking it seriously. But I was still eating what they were telling me, like porridge for breakfast!
    The reason I stick around, is because I do want to give those who are in the same boat and struggling with symptoms similar, how I have taken control of my body and the continuing success of how to cope with this rare (ish) condition I have.

    It was this forum, when after diagnosis, that changed my dietary lifestyle, my mindset, my health in so many ways, when the people who you should be trusting, are still stuck in the dark ages about why carbs can be so harmful for those like me!

    I just want to make a difference!
     
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