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Can use some help

Discussion in 'Diabetes Discussions' started by wozz2002, Oct 18, 2016.

  1. wozz2002

    wozz2002 Type 2 · Member

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    July 1 2016 I had a stroke. Thats when I found out that I have type 2. A1c at that time was 11.9.Just had another test Oct 2016 and it is down to 7.6. I know I still have a ways to go. I got the A1c down just by lowering carbs. Here is my problem. during the day my bg is in the normal range most of the time. once in a while it will go up a bit but not too often. every morning it is up around 177-187. I am on metforman. I was asked by the dr to try and check bg level through the night. 7pm 165 9pm 140 11pm 130 12pm 123 4am 180.This seems to be a nightly recurrence. I was told it could be my liver but that was it. Can anyone shed some more light on this subject for me along with any advice as to what I can do to stop this or correct this. I would like to know if there is anything I can do or if there was something that worked for any of you. Thank You Peter Woznack
     
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  2. chalup

    chalup Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi and welcome to the forum. Do a search here on the forum for dawn phenomenon. There are a lot of threads on this subject. A large portion of us have to deal with it. I wish I could tell you how to stop it but I haven't figured it out myself.
     
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  3. wozz2002

    wozz2002 Type 2 · Member

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    With high morning numbers, are you able to get your bg numbers down within reason?
     
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  4. chalup

    chalup Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Yes, I will be close to 7 in the morning and once I have eaten something non carb I will usually be in the 5's most of the day and occasionally in the 4's in the evening. I eat less than 20 grams carb per day though and none in the morning when most insulin resistant. I will tag @daisy1 for you to send you the welcoming information package. I highly recommend reading it through and checking out the link at the bottom for the low carb program. It is free.
     
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  5. wozz2002

    wozz2002 Type 2 · Member

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    Thank You
     
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  6. ChrisSamsDad

    ChrisSamsDad Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    What's your weight like? Do you need to get your BMI down - there seems to be an effect where your liver is what's most insulin resistant - one of the important jobs of insulin is to tell the liver to stop pumping out glucose when it's already at a high level, but having a fatty liver will make it resistant to this message. As you lose weight and your liver returns to being less fatty, you will probably find it's going to cut down your background glucose level.

    Hope you enjoy the low carb diet as much as I have, and you'll probably find, as many here have, that it'll not only very quickly lower your BG, but weight loss will be a side-effect and that will lower your BG too, so it'll be a 'virtuous circle'
     
  7. wozz2002

    wozz2002 Type 2 · Member

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    I'm 6'1" and 260 so yes I need to loose some weight. The funny thing is I thought I would loose some by cutting down on bread and milk etc.yet I have been putting some on in the 3 month that I have been trying. Is weight loss the only way to heal a fatty liver? Thank You
     
  8. chalup

    chalup Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    As far as I know the only way to heal a fatty liver is weight loss. To get a start on it and losing weight as well as controlling your blood glucose, cutting out bread, rice, potato, pasta, fruit (except berries), all grains, root vegetables, and milk is the way to go. Most other full fat dairy is fine as is all meats, fish, poultry, shellfish, salad veggies, other non root veggies such as broccoli, cauliflower, asparagus, green beans, etc. (Peas and carrots are a no-no) You can have nuts in limited quantities (peanuts are not nuts). Avocados and olives are excellent snacks. Once you get things under control you use your meter to figure out what foods you can add back in as this will be different for each individual. This is called eating to your meter and it is how you figure out what foods work for you long term. Others will tell you to ease into it but I believe it is easier to go super strict at first, get rid of the cravings quickly, get your BS under control, and then start to carefully expand your diet. Hope this helps.
     
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  9. wozz2002

    wozz2002 Type 2 · Member

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    If you don't know yet I live in the usa. I just want to thank all of you for your help. For the last three months I have been to Drs diabetic clinics nutritionist and american diabetic association not counting online here in the usa. In the last hour or so I have had more help here than in the last 3 months in the usa. I wasn't sure at first what kind of info I would get here. I was wrong. I wish I was able to meet everyone. Thanks for the help Peter Woznack
     
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  10. chalup

    chalup Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I am from Canada so we are neighbors :) and I am glad to help. I don't think it matters where in the world you are, the medical profession, especially dieticians, are useless. They just keep spouting the same tired old bullsh** that got us fat and diabetic in the first place. The people on this forum are awesome. Stick with us and keep asking questions if you have them.
     
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  11. wozz2002

    wozz2002 Type 2 · Member

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    Thank You
     
  12. ChrisSamsDad

    ChrisSamsDad Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I wouldn't go that far. There are many doctors and dietitians who do keep up with the latest research and understand about low carb diets. The problem is that medicine can move too slowly. It's good that it is cautious, and doesn't jump on some mad theory that becomes popular with no evidence, but sometimes it can be glacially slow to change its opinions even when there is clear proof. Doctors learnt about diabetes from a textbook written years ago and don't routinely learn anything about nutrition.
     
  13. daisy1

    daisy1 Type 2 · Legend

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    Hello Peter and welcome to the forum :) Here is the information we give to new members and I hope you will find it useful. Ask more questions and someone will be able to help.


    BASIC INFORMATION FOR NEWLY DIAGNOSED DIABETICS

    Diabetes is the general term to describe people who have blood that is sweeter than normal. A number of different types of diabetes exist.

    A diagnosis of diabetes tends to be a big shock for most of us. It’s far from the end of the world though and on this forum you'll find well over 210,000 people who are demonstrating this.

    On the forum we have found that with the number of new people being diagnosed with diabetes each day, sometimes the NHS is not being able to give all the advice it would perhaps like to deliver - particularly with regards to people with type 2 diabetes.

    The role of carbohydrate

    Carbohydrates are a factor in diabetes because they ultimately break down into sugar (glucose) within our blood. We then need enough insulin to either convert the blood sugar into energy for our body, or to store the blood sugar as body fat.

    If the amount of carbohydrate we take in is more than our body’s own (or injected) insulin can cope with, then our blood sugar will rise.

    The bad news

    Research indicates that raised blood sugar levels over a period of years can lead to organ damage, commonly referred to as diabetic complications.

    The good news

    People on the forum here have shown that there is plenty of opportunity to keep blood sugar levels from going too high. It’s a daily task but it’s within our reach and it’s well worth the effort.

    Controlling your carbs

    The info below is primarily aimed at people with type 2 diabetes, however, it may also be of benefit for other types of diabetes as well.

    There are two approaches to controlling your carbs:

    • Reduce your carbohydrate intake
    • Choose ‘better’ carbohydrates
    Reduce your carbohydrates

    A large number of people on this forum have chosen to reduce the amount of carbohydrates they eat as they have found this to be an effective way of improving (lowering) their blood sugar levels.

    The carbohydrates which tend to have the most pronounced effect on blood sugar levels tend to be starchy carbohydrates such as rice, pasta, bread, potatoes and similar root vegetables, flour based products (pastry, cakes, biscuits, battered food etc) and certain fruits.

    Choosing better carbohydrates

    The low glycaemic index diet is often favoured by healthcare professionals but some people with diabetes find that low GI does not help their blood sugar enough and may wish to cut out these foods altogether.

    Read more on carbohydrates and diabetes.

    Over 145,000 people have taken part in the Low Carb Program - a free 10 week structured education course that is helping people lose weight and reduce medication dependency by explaining the science behind carbs, insulin and GI.

    Eating what works for you

    Different people respond differently to different types of food. What works for one person may not work so well for another. The best way to see which foods are working for you is to test your blood sugar with a glucose meter.

    To be able to see what effect a particular type of food or meal has on your blood sugar is to do a test before the meal and then test after the meal. A test 2 hours after the meal gives a good idea of how your body has reacted to the meal.

    The blood sugar ranges recommended by NICE are as follows:

    Blood glucose ranges for type 2 diabetes
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 8.5 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (adults)
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 9 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (children)
    • Before meals: 4 to 8 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 10 mmol/l
    However, those that are able to, may wish to keep blood sugar levels below the NICE after meal targets.

    Access to blood glucose test strips

    The NICE guidelines suggest that people newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes should be offered:

    • structured education to every person and/or their carer at and around the time of diagnosis, with annual reinforcement and review
    • self-monitoring of plasma glucose to a person newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes only as an integral part of his or her self-management education

    Therefore both structured education and self-monitoring of blood glucose should be offered to people with type 2 diabetes. Read more on getting access to blood glucose testing supplies.

    You may also be interested to read questions to ask at a diabetic clinic.

    Note: This post has been edited from Sue/Ken's post to include up to date information.
     
  14. sohailgagai

    sohailgagai · Well-Known Member

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    Only 20 carbs per day how what is your food I also need this help pls help me
    Thanks
     
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  15. DavidGrahamJones

    DavidGrahamJones Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I've also replied to one of your messages on another thread. Please bare in mind that when somebody says that they eat 20gms of carb a day, that's what suits them. I mange on a bit more, usually between 40 and 80 gms and never more than 100 gms (as opposed to the 250gms average). You have to use your meter to see what effects carbs have on YOUR body. There are some people on this forum who can eat 3 shredded wheat and it's not a problem, others will see their BG go up and up. If you can lower your carbs just cut out rice/pasta/potatoes/bread for a few weeks and then see what effect having a few slices of bread make
     
  16. sohailgagai

    sohailgagai · Well-Known Member

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    OK I got your point I cut it for a weak then lets see Thankyou soo much is eating bran bread OK Thankyou
     
  17. Freema

    Freema Type 2 · Expert

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    everything with lots of carbs are potentially bad if eaten in larger amounts...

    you can read on the foods you buy how much carb is in it...
     
    #17 Freema, Oct 19, 2016 at 4:41 PM
    Last edited: Oct 19, 2016
  18. Nicksu

    Nicksu Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    • Informative Informative x 1
  19. chalup

    chalup Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Low Carb Program - http://www.diabetes.co.uk/lowcarb/ Please check out this program. It will help you with food choices. In the end you need to find out what your individual body can handle. Good luck.
     
  20. sohailgagai

    sohailgagai · Well-Known Member

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