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Children with Diabetes

Discussion in 'Diabetes Discussions' started by mISSLGR, Apr 4, 2022.

  1. mISSLGR

    mISSLGR · Newbie

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    Hi, I have a new girl starting in my class after Easter who has t1, just wanted to ask what to look out for? And what allowances I need to make for her? Thanks
     
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  2. Olihill99

    Olihill99 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Make sure too look at out for her sugars dropping she will become pail and sweaty you will notice it I assume she will have a libre sensor attached to her arm which will alarm you of her lows but double check with her so you know, she will need to have sugary stuff in class at all time sweets or orange juice full fat coke her mum will probs have a plan for her but just to be sure It would be safe
     
  3. Olihill99

    Olihill99 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I also assume she will have the insulin pump but if she injects that will need to be assisted I reckon but he’s to double check with parents
     
  4. In Response

    In Response Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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  5. mISSLGR

    mISSLGR · Newbie

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    Excellent
     
  6. sleepster

    sleepster Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Not necessarily.
    Admittedly I'm not a child, but I've never been pale when hypo and very rarely sweaty, when I was younger I definitely never had sweaty hypos.

    Hi @mISSLGR, obviously the best thing to do would be to check with her parents/guardians what signs they usually notice if she is low or high and also find out if she usually knows herself if she is low/high. It may be that her behaviour changes, she might have trouble paying attention or become argumentative (speaking from experience), not everybody's symptoms are the same.
     
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  7. Olihill99

    Olihill99 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Yeah different for everyone but I’m type 1 and I deffo sweat a lot when hypo and go white pale every time but yeah I would deffo check with the parent for there signs
     
  8. Hopeful34

    Hopeful34 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    It will depend on her age, understanding of her diabetes etc. Is she new to the school, or just to your class? My understanding is that schools are required to have plans in place for diabetic children, so I'd ask your colleagues and the head teacher, in addition to the child's parents/guardians.
     
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  9. Olihill99

    Olihill99 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I’m 21 as-well I think it depends on the person young or old
     
  10. sleepster

    sleepster Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    ? So am I..... o_O
    You said she will become pale and sweaty, I'm just saying that she might not.
     
  11. Olihill99

    Olihill99 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Yeah init best to ask parents or guardian I agree :)
     
  12. Antje77

    Antje77 LADA · Moderator
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    The way diabetes care is done varies a lot from person to person.
    I think the best thing you can do is to plan in a good long appointment with her/her parents (are we talking a 5 year old or a 15 year old here?) to let them explain exactly what you can do to help them.
    If it's a very young child attending school for the first time, the parents will likely be very nervous, showing them you take their childs diabetes seriously and are willing to follow their guidance will make the world of difference.

    If some of the daily diabetes care will be done or supervised by you or the school, it can be very helpful to see if her diabetes nurse can sit in on this appointment as well, to help make a sound plan to follow.

    Thank you for reaching out beforehand to make things go as smoothly as possible for the girl!
     
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  13. Jaylee

    Jaylee Type 1 · Moderator
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    Hi,

    Welcome to the forum.

    Been a long time since I was at school.
    You'd probably kick me out the class for being a chatterbox talking nonsense & stammering? When low.

    My thoughts are if the kid goes hypo? Don't alow the child to expend any more of what little energy she might have left by "sending" somewhere else to treat the low?

    She may well be packing her own "emergencies" to treat. Let her quietly carry on.
    By all means keep something handy in your desk drawer or wot not..

    Unfortunately, lows can if they happen be a normal part of D life.

    This short & rather funky vid may give an insight.?

     
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  14. mISSLGR

    mISSLGR · Newbie

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    Thanks for all the great info, she is 8
     
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  15. Jaylee

    Jaylee Type 1 · Moderator
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    So was I.. You will both do brilliantly. :)
     
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  16. Japes

    Japes LADA · Well-Known Member

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    There should be a detailed care plan in place, drawn up between school/parents/healthcare professionals. (This is in addition to an EHCP, if you're in England, that is.)

    That will cover what's needed, who's responsible for what, and what additional training any staff involved will need. Also worth knowing how much this child does for herself and her level of understanding.

    I would not assume anything about what this child uses in the way of diabetes kit until you've seen that and spoken to the parents/carers/healthcare professionals! Also, you will get to know this child well and their signs - we're all different in how we present when hypo or hyper. My students send me off to test if I'm talking what they consider nonsense.... and send me off for a walk /drink of water if they hear me muttering about a higher than an anticipated number.

    The classroom I'm in has a large drawer which the three of us who are T1 in the room (yes, a bit excessive, but it's just everyday life in our classroom) all use for keeping emergency hypo supplies in. We keep spare bits of kit/consumables in a lockable drawer. Additional insulin is kept locked in a lockable fridge in our on-site nurses room.

    We do extra checks around gym sessions or if we've been moving around more than usual.
     
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