1. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android.
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Guest, we'd love to know what you think about the forum! Take the Diabetes Forum Survey 2021 »
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Diabetes Forum should not be used in an emergency and does not replace your healthcare professional relationship. Posts can be seen by the public.
    Dismiss Notice
  4. Guest, stay home, stay safe, save the NHS. Stay up to date with information about keeping yourself and people around you safe here and GOV.UK: Coronavirus (COVID-19). Think you have symptoms? NHS 111 service is available here.
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community »

Choosing a pump

Discussion in 'Insulin Pump Forum' started by SKB_9, Apr 18, 2021.

  1. SKB_9

    SKB_9 Type 1 · Member

    Messages:
    19
    Likes Received:
    5
    Trophy Points:
    43
    I have just been recommended an insulin pump by my consultant however the information from my clinic was very sparse. I have been sent a list of about 5 pumps to choose from, and told that the nurse cannot advise me on which to choose and whichever I go for I will be tied into for four years and unable to change until then.

    This is all fine but I feel like I’m making a really important decision completely blind. I have looked at the pump websites and I don’t feel like I understand what I’m looking at. Ideally I want to compare features to make a choice it I know nothing about pumps and what I should be looking for, so I’m finding it overwhelming. For example I see zero basal rate function but no idea what it is, if I want or need it, if this is a standard feature etc etc.

    Does anyone have any tips for what to look for in choosing a pump, or can point me to somewhere online that I could get some information that’s a bit more clear? I know I should ask for more info but my clinic isn’t very forthcoming and all contact at the minute is by telephone with really appalling signal at the hospital so it’s very difficult to make that work.

    for what it’s worth I’m leaning towards omnipod (no idea if it’s the new or old one) because wire free seems a good option for me and my small children, but no idea what features I might be compromising for the sake of no wire. By the way I’ve been diagnosed 3 years (at 29) and find I can get good control on MDI but multiple daily hypos since having children hence the pump.

    Any advice greatly appreciated
     
  2. Maco

    Maco Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    278
    Likes Received:
    108
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Hi @SKB_9, I’m a new pumper myself. I started on the 7th of January this year. I was granted funding for a pump & a Cgm for a closed loop system so I went with the Medtronic 780G with there Guardian 3 CGM. For me having a closed loop system was a no brainer. I’m quite active, go to the gym 6 days a week & go for long walks or do cardio probably 4/5 times a week. My basal requirements can be different daily.

    The Medtronic 780 is basically an artificial pancreas. It adjusts my basal needs every 5 minutes automatically & can also give automatic correction doses. If the pump senses im going low it’ll shut off all insulin & vice versa when the sensor picks up my bloods going high it’ll give me a correction dose to stop it.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  3. Capt-Slog

    Capt-Slog LADA · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    166
    Likes Received:
    103
    Trophy Points:
    103
    Hi,
    Can you tell us what pumps are on the list? You are extremely lucky to be able to choose from 5 options. A lot of areas only give one or two options.

    I chose the Tandem t:slim X2 because I needed a lot of insulin and it holds 300u in the cartridge. Unfortunately it does have a tube and cannula. I have gotten used to the tube, but I wish I could have a patch pump.

    Almost ALL of the other people in my area chose the Omnipod. It is a very good pump and is cordless.
    There are other patch pumps, but I think that the Omnipod is pretty much the most popular choice.
    You can now control it from your phone, instead of having to carry a separate controller, which is a good thing.

    Patch pumps are probably the way ahead, provided 200u is enough insulin for you for 3 days.

    Also, I think I am right in saying that Patch pumps do not require you to have insurance because you are changing the whole thing.

    Because I keep my pump and change the cartridge, I have to insure my pump for £4000.00 myself.

    There are lots of other things that people use to make their choice, but most people are not qualified to evaluate the pumps themselves, which I think is the crux of your dillema.

    You will probably take part in group training for your pump.
    I was the ONLY person in my group who did not have an Omnipod.
    The others in my group were keeping in touch and that effectively gave them a great local support group.
    You may want to factor that into your choice too.

    I hope that this helps you a little.

    Regards Chris
     
  4. In Response

    In Response Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    469
    Likes Received:
    284
    Trophy Points:
    103
    I would start by listing what is important to you. What is important to me and my lifestyle probably doesn’t bother you.
    Then read, watch YouTube videos and learn about the pumps on offer.

    Also consider the criteria that qualify you for a pump and check which is the best to satisfy that criteria.
    Then check what you have qualified for. Is it just a pump or also a CGM which can talk to the pump? There is no pint looking at closed loop unless you have a CGM. Are you willing to fund a CGM yourself? (Libre does not count as it is not integrated to any pumps today).

    I have experience of two different pumps and see the value in both ... for me. I know others do not like the ones I have used. I had no choice but happy with both.
     
  5. In Response

    In Response Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    469
    Likes Received:
    284
    Trophy Points:
    103
    This is not the case.
    Patch pumps still need to be insured as you do not change the whole thing. Only the patch, not the part with the brains.
     
    #5 In Response, Apr 18, 2021 at 11:23 PM
    Last edited: Apr 19, 2021
  6. sleepster

    sleepster Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    466
    Likes Received:
    239
    Trophy Points:
    103
    Hi @SKB_9, I'm a Medtronic 640g pump user. It would be good to know what options you have been given.
    I think a crucial point when considering an Omnipod is as @Capt-Slog says - is 200 units of insulin enough for you for 3 days. I've seen posts on here where people are running out of insulin before the 3 days is up and there is no way to add more to the pod. At my clinic they told you whether you could have an Omnipod or not based on whether your insulin requirements were low enough, but I guess some clinics fail to do that :nailbiting: something to consider though is your insulin requirements may change once you start on the pump, previously I was on a carb ratio of 1 unit per 5g, when I started my pump I changed to 1 unit per 10g, it has changed since then but I think (somebody correct me if I'm wrong please!) it's quite normal to need less insulin on a pump.
     
  7. searley

    searley Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,069
    Likes Received:
    410
    Trophy Points:
    143
    People that have pumps that integrate with CGM and work closed loop. So tandem/Medtronic seem to have better overall control. But the cgm in most cases will not be supplied by the nhs so would need to be self funded However they will work without cgm but just be a basic pump

    So for me I choose tandem as I wanted closed loop even if I had to self fund…

    The next consideration is tube or not.. I got used to the tube in 3 days

    With omnipod/non cgm. you’ll still need regular bg tests to know what’s happening and for dosing etc

    Whatever you choose it will be better than what you currently have
     
  8. Chas C

    Chas C Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    872
    Likes Received:
    467
    Trophy Points:
    123
    Hi @SKB_9

    When I started nearly 10 years ago it was not so hard a choice as all were piped pumps.

    I made a list of what I wanted to do and my life style, then did my best to match the pumps to these questions and see which one fitted best.

    As for operation questions.
    Zero basal - is when the pump see's via a CGM that your BG is going to be low and stops your background basal to help bring your BG back up - you need a CGM for this.
    Loop Pumps (Medtronic/t:slim), act like a dimmer switch turning down or up or off your insulin based upon your BG read via a CMG to manage your levels. Without a CGM these Loop pumps act like normal pumps.
    Remote control - I see your looking for maybe a patch pump due to your children, I personally would agree with @searley and choose one that will allow your phone to be the controller, if not then look at the size of the controller and remember you need that with you at all times.

    I waited around 10 years after first being offered a pump because I thought I could not manage with something attached via a pipe and it was 10 yrs wasted.
     
  9. DunePlodder

    DunePlodder Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    841
    Likes Received:
    620
    Trophy Points:
    153
    Hi @SKB_9
    I am very happy with my Tandem t:slim.
    I fund a Dexcom CGM to enable the closed loop capabilities.
    Even if you can't afford the CGM now, this may change in the next 4 years or the NHS might fund them - you never know!
    Usually you get a pump for 4 years. One positive advantage of the t:slim (and the Medtronic 780G?) is that the software may be updated. I've had 2 updates so far in 2 years.
     
  10. SKB_9

    SKB_9 Type 1 · Member

    Messages:
    19
    Likes Received:
    5
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Wow everyone this is all so helpful, thank you all so much. Some really good suggestions on how to consider what might work for me.
    I have learned that I am lucky to get so much choice but I really felt I needed a bit more guidance. For those interested, (@Capt-Slog @sleepster the ones I have been told to look at are Medtronic 640G, Roche Accucheck Insight, Omnipad dash, A6 Touchcare, Tandem slim, mylife ypsopump.


    I’d love a closed loop but unfortunately I wouldn’t be able to afford it now I have my baby and nursery fees, I use the libre with good success which I self funded until it was offered by nhs. That will have to do for at least the next four years and then I might be able to reconsider!

    thanks, no one has mentioned this to me but I was told to consider the omnipod, not sure if they’ve checked this already or not but I will make sure to ask. Just made a note in my phone of what I’ve had so far today and will do for the next couple of days! I do keep getting told I’m very sensitive to insulin...


    I have read that in a couple of threads on here actually, I’m 1:10 or 1:12 at the moment so if I do find I need less then even better!

    Agreed!!

    I felt the same when I was first diagnosed it was mentioned and I wrote it off, I think it was all a bit overwhelming for me at the time but now I feel ready to give it a go! I’m actually looking forward to it especially now I’ve had such useful insights here.


    Insurance hasn’t even been mentioned so thanks to both of you who did here, I will ask about this too.

    I’m definitely leaning towards omnipod and have a few useful questions to ask the nurse now, but I’ll go and look at the others now I have a bit of direction! I have to choose by next week. I used loads of ‘reply’ functions in this which I’ve not done before so apologies if it’s all gone awry, I’ll have another go if it did!
     
    • Like Like x 1
  11. 35yearsofType1

    35yearsofType1 · Active Member

    Messages:
    33
    Likes Received:
    10
    Trophy Points:
    8
    Just a quick note - I do closed loop and use Freestyle Libre that I get on the nhs as my cgm - this means it’s all completely free no extra costs.
     
  • Meet the Community

    Find support, connect with others, ask questions and share your experiences with people with diabetes, their carers and family.

    Did you know: 7 out of 10 people improve their understanding of diabetes within 6 months of being a Diabetes Forum member. Get the Diabetes Forum App and stay connected on iOS and Android

    Grab the app!
  • Tweet with us

  • Like us on Facebook