1. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android.
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Guest, we'd love to know what you think about the forum! Take the Diabetes Forum Survey 2022 »
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Diabetes Forum should not be used in an emergency and does not replace your healthcare professional relationship. Posts can be seen by the public.
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community »

Confused

Discussion in 'Diabetes Discussions' started by Renard, Jul 19, 2017.

  1. Renard

    Renard Type 2 · Member

    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    21
    Hi new member here,diagnosed type 2 three years ago take four metformin plus one Pioglitazone Teva daily , no adverse effects from medication and no noticeable diabetic symptoms despite this my blood sugar levels are a bit too high and are not responding to medication nor cutting out all added sugar from my diet.

    My confusion arises from what I read that a low carb diet is best for diabetics, however I have been on a low fat diet for several years due to heart disease which I had some years before being diabetic , when diagnosed with heart disease both blood pressure and cholesterol were sky high, blood pressure now normal and cholesterol levels perfect.

    While I may cut back on carbs a little a high fat diet is a big no for me , would struggle to survive on a low carb low fat diet,
    My Doctor says that a high fat diet is not suitable for me ,and I would rather go with his advice than what I might read on the internet.
    Any advice from anyone in the same situation would be appreciated.
     
    • Hug Hug x 4
  2. DavidGrahamJones

    DavidGrahamJones Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,260
    Likes Received:
    2,103
    Trophy Points:
    178
    Hi Renard,

    welcome to the forum. There is no need to be confused although when people talk about low carb diets they normally refer to a LCHF diet. The thing is that the HF is entirely optional. For example I did not initially increase my fats because I couldn't tolerate fat after years on a low fat diet. In fact when I increased fats like yoghurt and cream in my diet at the doctor's suggestion, I gained 11kgs, so for me a disaster.
    Lower your carbs and keep doing what you do with low fat and bare in mind the calorie reduction (carbs are often about 1/3 of our calories) weight reduction will probably occur. Of course if you're not overweight then that's not what you want so you may have to look at ways of increasing calories but not fat.
    Hope that helps LCLF is the way to go.
    All the best.
     
    • Like Like x 2
  3. DaftThoughts

    DaftThoughts LADA · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    397
    Likes Received:
    613
    Trophy Points:
    133
    I can't low carb/high fat for other reasons but if there's one thing I've learned, it's that everyone's different. Two people eating the very same diet can lead to dramatically different outcomes - one person is the healthiest they've ever been while the other gets sicker.

    LCHF is beneficial to a lot of people but there's nothing wrong with not following it, especially when you have a medical professional's advice to avoid it. You know your body best.

    You could try to incorporate a couple of days in the week where you low carb rather than going low carb full time. Even such a small change can have a solid effect on your values over an extended period of time! I totally understand not being able to commit to a specific/limited diet so don't feel pressured to, but small changes go very far with this.
     
  4. Renard

    Renard Type 2 · Member

    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    21
    Thanks that makes a !of of sense.
     
  5. Renard

    Renard Type 2 · Member

    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    21
    Thank you.
     
  6. JohnEGreen

    JohnEGreen Other · Master

    Messages:
    12,088
    Likes Received:
    23,493
    Trophy Points:
    298
    @Renard Yup always listen to your doctor. I do though I don't always comply I always listen. You do not mention if you take statins or not. As if you do they will have reduced your cholesterol levels at least as much as following a low fat diet.

    And I thought it was the norm now to offer statins to all diabetics especially those with heart conditions pardon me for asking don't wish to seem nosey just curious.
     
  7. Renard

    Renard Type 2 · Member

    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    21
    Yes I do take statins..
     
  8. ickihun

    ickihun Type 2 · Master

    Messages:
    13,697
    Likes Received:
    18,514
    Trophy Points:
    298
    I'm doing low carb, low fat and at last I'm losing weight from my now 19 and a half stone body which was nearing 22stones.
    I added weight on high fat diet.
     
  9. ickihun

    ickihun Type 2 · Master

    Messages:
    13,697
    Likes Received:
    18,514
    Trophy Points:
    298
    Every cardiologist I've come across recently advises statins.
    I've told my gp I can do things well without it, especially when I experienced side affects, again. Mind u my gp has seen my previous 3.9 cholesterol results which were healthy and in keeping with low heart attack risk.
    Can you walk ok? Its excellent for lowering cholesterol.
     
  10. Renard

    Renard Type 2 · Member

    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    21
    Yes I can walk OK though suffer angina if I over do it sometimes, I am retired now but still work part time in a job that involves a lot of walking ,I was extremely fit prior to heart attach seven years ago( two attacks within four days of each other).
    I suffer some side effects from medication ( nothing severe) but not sure which are at fault as I take eight different medications for my heart and two for diabetes daily.
     
  11. ickihun

    ickihun Type 2 · Master

    Messages:
    13,697
    Likes Received:
    18,514
    Trophy Points:
    298
    From what I concluded as a severe insulin resistant type2 is that higher cholesterol didn't help my atherosclerosis (narrowing of arteries in heart disease). All research backs that up. Cardiologist rely on it by calcium scores and angiograms.
    So if you keep your cholesterol down by a means which works for you, your in the right direction.
    Smoking is the biggest agitent to heart attack after high cholesterol. High blood pressure is a trigger.
    Sounds to me your well controlled for avoiding another heart attack from your info and what I've read.
    Now getting bgs lower is very possible by tweaking your levels of carbs. Many replace rice with cauliflower and pasta with leeks and potato with cauliflower too. Chips with celeriac. No cereal, not even porriage unless your meter doesn't show a lingering spike.
    The best health for a diabetic is steady bgs not erratic highs and lows. Only your meter can tell you if certain foods do that to you and then avoid them. Test before food and then 2hrs later to see whether porriage or other cereals or seeded/wholemeal bread spikes you. @daisy1 has some great info so I'll tag her to give you the info newees to the forum find helpful.
    Ps. I'm using protein bread from warbartons instead of wheat breads. Since partner and kids have swopped they have lost weight from their tummies. ;)
     
  12. Renard

    Renard Type 2 · Member

    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    21
    l
    That all makes sense , but and there is a but my health centre recommend slow release carbs such as porridge also I don't test tested every three months at health centre ( I am on metformin) they say a continuing downward trend is more important than occasional spikes!
    My other problem with diet is when working I work away from home sometimes for several weeks at a time accommodation and meals are provided limited choice, I do try to eat healthily but it can be difficult at times.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  13. daisy1

    daisy1 Type 2 · Legend

    Messages:
    26,457
    Likes Received:
    4,881
    Trophy Points:
    248
    @Renard

    Hello Renard and welcome to the Forum. Here is the Basic Information we give to new members and I hope it will be useful to you. Ask questions when you need to and someone will be able to help.


    BASIC INFORMATION FOR NEW MEMBERS

    Diabetes is the general term to describe people who have blood that is sweeter than normal. A number of different types of diabetes exist.

    A diagnosis of diabetes tends to be a big shock for most of us. It’s far from the end of the world though and on this forum you'll find well over 245,000 people who are demonstrating this.

    On the forum we have found that with the number of new people being diagnosed with diabetes each day, sometimes the NHS is not being able to give all the advice it would perhaps like to deliver - particularly with regards to people with type 2 diabetes.

    The role of carbohydrate

    Carbohydrates are a factor in diabetes because they ultimately break down into sugar (glucose) within our blood. We then need enough insulin to either convert the blood sugar into energy for our body, or to store the blood sugar as body fat.

    If the amount of carbohydrate we take in is more than our body’s own (or injected) insulin can cope with, then our blood sugar will rise.

    The bad news

    Research indicates that raised blood sugar levels over a period of years can lead to organ damage, commonly referred to as diabetic complications.

    The good news

    People on the forum here have shown that there is plenty of opportunity to keep blood sugar levels from going too high. It’s a daily task but it’s within our reach and it’s well worth the effort.

    Controlling your carbs

    The info below is primarily aimed at people with type 2 diabetes, however, it may also be of benefit for other types of diabetes as well.

    There are two approaches to controlling your carbs:
    • Reduce your carbohydrate intake
    • Choose ‘better’ carbohydrates
    Reduce your carbohydrates

    A large number of people on this forum have chosen to reduce the amount of carbohydrates they eat as they have found this to be an effective way of improving (lowering) their blood sugar levels.

    The carbohydrates which tend to have the most pronounced effect on blood sugar levels tend to be starchy carbohydrates such as rice, pasta, bread, potatoes and similar root vegetables, flour based products (pastry, cakes, biscuits, battered food etc) and certain fruits.

    Choosing better carbohydrates

    The low glycaemic index diet is often favoured by healthcare professionals but some people with diabetes find that low GI does not help their blood sugar enough and may wish to cut out these foods altogether.

    Read more on carbohydrates and diabetes.

    Over 145,000 people have taken part in the Low Carb Program - a free 10 week structured education course that is helping people lose weight and reduce medication dependency by explaining the science behind carbs, insulin and GI.

    Eating what works for you

    Different people respond differently to different types of food. What works for one person may not work so well for another. The best way to see which foods are working for you is to test your blood sugar with a glucose meter.

    To be able to see what effect a particular type of food or meal has on your blood sugar is to do a test before the meal and then test after the meal. A test 2 hours after the meal gives a good idea of how your body has reacted to the meal.

    The blood sugar ranges recommended by NICE are as follows:

    Blood glucose ranges for type 2 diabetes
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 8.5 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (adults)
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 9 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (children)
    • Before meals: 4 to 8 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 10 mmol/l
    However, those that are able to, may wish to keep blood sugar levels below the NICE after meal targets.

    Access to blood glucose test strips

    The NICE guidelines suggest that people newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes should be offered:

    • structured education to every person and/or their carer at and around the time of diagnosis, with annual reinforcement and review
    • self-monitoring of plasma glucose to a person newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes only as an integral part of his or her self-management education

    Therefore both structured education and self-monitoring of blood glucose should be offered to people with type 2 diabetes. Read more on getting access to blood glucose testing supplies.

    You may also be interested to read questions to ask at a diabetic clinic.

    Note: This post has been edited from Sue/Ken's post to include up to date information.

    Take part in Diabetes.co.uk digital education programs and improve your understanding. They're all free.
    • Low Carb Program - it's made front-page news of the New Scientist and The Times. Developed with 20,000 people with type 2 diabetes; 96% of people who take part recommend it... find out why
    • Hypo Program - improve your understanding of hypos. There's a version for people with diabetes, parents/guardians of children with type 1, children with type 1 diabetes, teachers and HCPs.
     
  14. Resurgam

    Resurgam Type 2 (in remission!) · Expert

    Messages:
    9,276
    Likes Received:
    5,566
    Trophy Points:
    198
    I can't promise that it will help, but since going back to my old eating habits after diagnosis with type 2 I have been using spices in my food - something I did not realise is a bit unusual.
    I put cinnamon in my coffee, a tiny pinch, plus a few grains of salt in the hot weather - I do not use salt in cooking my food so that small amount stops cramps. I add cumin or turmeric and black pepper to my cauliflower cheese or scrambled egg and cheese, or to cream cheese in a salad.
    I used nutmeg to try to reduce the consequences of Metformin - but nothing helped that problem.
    I used to work in the food industry in my 20s and had access to all sorts of spices so I got used to having test and evaluation samples of all sorts freely available.
    I gather from my results - dropping from 91 to 41 in 6 months is unusual - that my diet might be particularly effective.
     
  15. leslie10152

    leslie10152 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,110
    Likes Received:
    1,397
    Trophy Points:
    178
    This may require a little experimentation, but make sure you check with your gp.
     
  16. RFSMarch

    RFSMarch Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    644
    Likes Received:
    768
    Trophy Points:
    133
    I have the same issue. I was just diagnosed as Type 2 with high cholesterol and high BP. This week I managed to get BP to pre-high a couple of times this week since starting back with conditioning stretches and cardio, but what seems to be acceptable for low carb goes well against the doc's advice of low fat diary for reducing cholesterol.

    I have a few weeks' grace on the cholesterol front - he wants to wait until another round of blood tests in a couple of months to see if I can stabilise on metformin. I have read around, and also taking into account his own advice, I am opting for using the GI index for now to move away from high, and head towards low GI and awaiting blood sugar testers and monitors over the next week to get a better handle on that.

    As I was only diagnosed on Monday, it was a lot to take in, so I need to focus on doing one thing well/better and then working from that point. I hope that when I get back from latest trip (which presents its own challenges) I can at least have gotten my BP down, and a better handle on my BG and see what needs attention in 8 weeks.
     
  17. goosey39

    goosey39 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    115
    Likes Received:
    86
    Trophy Points:
    68
    I have had high BP for a long time and took medication still do but was at the DN thurs and these were my results for 3 moths since i was diagnosed, i go slimming world , have lost 3 stone , i do relativity low carb, no pasta/rice/potatoes if i have bread have max 2 slices small wholemeal a day also low fat
    HbAc1 was 57, now 42
    BP 121/76
    Serum Cholesterol 4.9 3 months ago was 5.9
    Serum Trigs 1.1 3 months ago was 1.6
    Serum HDL 1.5 3 months ago was 1.5
     
  • Meet the Community

    Find support, connect with others, ask questions and share your experiences with people with diabetes, their carers and family.

    Did you know: 7 out of 10 people improve their understanding of diabetes within 6 months of being a Diabetes Forum member. Get the Diabetes Forum App and stay connected on iOS and Android

    Grab the app!
  • Tweet with us

  • Like us on Facebook