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Confused?

Discussion in 'Ask A Question' started by sweetenoughsal, Dec 10, 2008.

  1. sweetenoughsal

    sweetenoughsal · Newbie

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    Hi all,

    First time i have posted, so forgive me if i am in the wrong place, Had fasting test few weeks ago and that came back at 6.8, they sent me back for GTT which after glucose came back at 8.7? The doc said i am borderline diabetic and should now start to follow a diet which allows no sugar etc, After reading numourous posts on here i see many people with so much higher readings, could someone enlighten me what a avarage joes reading would be. The nurse said they are clamping down now with readings and anything over 5 will now be classed as diabetic?
    I am embarrsingly overweight and am currently on treatment for high blood preasure.
    Very confussed, and also quite worried as think it will be massive struggle re diet etc.
     
  2. graham64

    graham64 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi Sal,
    Welcome to the forum. The following are the GTT numbers, follow the link below for more detailed info.


    Random glucose test: glucose levels are taken at a random time on two occasions. Any figure above 11.1mmol/l is a diagnosis of diabetes
    Fasting glucose test: the glucose level is measured after an overnight fast and on two different days. Above 7.0mmol/l is a diagnosis of diabetes.


    http://www.netdoctor.co.uk/diseases/facts/diabetes.htm

    Best of luck
    Graham
     
  3. Trinkwasser

    Trinkwasser · Well-Known Member

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    Sensible doctor and nurse!

    The cutoff between "prediabetes" and "diabetes" has been set at the point where theoretically the disease process becomes irreversible

    http://www.bloodsugar101.com/

    if you can catch it as early as possible it becomes much easier to slow or even stop the progression

    ****, I was going to give a link I haven't given for a while but it looks like her website is down, try one of my usual recommendations

    http://loraldiabetes.blogspot.com/2006/10/d-day.html
     
  4. hanadr

    hanadr · Expert

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    Sal
    I'm wondering if you are really asking what a Non-diabetic BG would be
    If so from 4.5 to 5.5 is pretty much the normal range. It might go down more after a long fast or strenuous exercise, or go up as a result of a big meal of carbs. So close on to 5 is about normal
     
  5. sweetenoughsal

    sweetenoughsal · Newbie

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    Hi , yes thanks for that info, now could you please explain to me if my bg is staying about 6-7 before meals, whats the best way to reduce it? Also have started to cut all sugar in diet but not taking it to easy, guess i used alot before and body now craving it real bad, always hungry and not feel right in myself( shaky jittery etc) should it be a gradual process?
    would be great if i could gain some info x x thanks in advance Sal
     
  6. Mags52

    Mags52 · Member

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    Hi Sal,
    Although this seems tough I think your Dr is doing the right thing. I had readings like that 4 years ago and my GP just said, "Nah. You're not diabetic" Three years later they were higher and I was diagnosed.
    This is your chance to get on top of it in that pre-diabetic period.
    Cutting out sugar isn't enough. You need to vastly reduce the amount of visible carbohydrates (potatoes, pasta, rice, bread). Some people on this forum don't eat them at all but that was too hard for me and I have reduced them to a very very small portion at meals and this has brought my blood glucose down.
    The shakiness you describe is caused by two things (I think). One is that you are probably a bit addicted to sugar and carbs and the other is that your blood glucose will be going down and it feels a bit like a hypo. I had all these feelings and also feelings of grief (yes really) because I was a true carb addict and thought I would never enjoy eating again.
    I bought a low GI cook book and found recipes that used artifical sweeteners and low carb ingredients. That helped a lot.
    Once you change your eating your weight will start to go down, soon your shakiness will go and then as if my magic you'll start to feel more energetic.
    It is hard but there's lots of support and good advice on this forum.
    All the best
    Margaret
     
  7. Dennis

    Dennis Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi Sal,
    Excellent advice from Margaret. I would just like to add that sugar is extremely addictive. Many consultants regard it as more addictive than nicotine!. It is precisely because it is addictive that food manufacturers use so much of it - not only is it a very cheap food bulker but they want you to get hooked on their particular brand!

    Sugar encourages the production of seratonin by the brain, and seratonin is the hormone that is responsible for us having a feeling of well-being, so it is often referred to as the "feel-good" hormone. When you reduce your sugar intake, you produce less seratonin, so your brain starts to crave for more. Fortunately these cravings do wear off once your body gets used to the lower sugar (and therefore lower seratonin) levels, but it does take a few weeks.
     
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