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Curious about pregnancy and type 1

Discussion in 'Pregnancy' started by Priyanka, May 12, 2011.

  1. Priyanka

    Priyanka · Newbie

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    Hi all, I guess I'm coming to that age where I'm thinking about the future and I've read some the posts about how difficult pregnancy is for the type 1 but I was curious about what happens with work when you have to pay these weekly visits to the hospital. I was wondering if people would share their experiences as I can't imagine that I could get away with weekly visits to the hospital.
    Do type 1's find they have to scale back career wise or even opt for less demanding roles? Take maternity leave early?
    Thanks all
     
  2. cugila

    cugila · Master

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    Thread moved to Gestational, also remaining in Type 1 area to ellicit some responses to the Member.
     
  3. Geri

    Geri Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi there,
    I felt happier scaling down my career when I became pregnant.
    I was teaching full time but after giving birth I chose to go part time.

    I didnt sleep properly for years, and because my diabetes is brittle, I wanted to keep as well as possible for myself and my (then) baby of course.
    However, I think this depends on personal choice and circumstances..... and how well you can manage your diabetes as well.
    All the best, Geri
     
  4. wiflib

    wiflib Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    You are entitled, by law, to time off for ante-natal appointments. I can't see why you would need weekly visits though.

    Go to http://guidance.nice.org.uk/CG62 to find the guidelines for healthy women and those with diabetes.
    In a nutshell and on average, you'll get a booking appointment at about 9 weeks, a scan at about 12 weeks, an antenatal at 15-17, a scan at about 20 and then antenatal appointments at about 24, 28, 31,34, 36, 38, 40 and 41weeks. Where and who they are with varies with each woman, less if you've had a baby before, more if you or the baby is unwell. Best practice dictates that if there is a pre-existing medical condition, obstetricians and other specialties work together.

    wiflib
     
  5. jopar

    jopar · Well-Known Member

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    Your company have to allow you to attend any clinic that is necessary for your pregnancy.. In general yes your visits to clinic will be more frequent than a standard pregnacy but any weekly visits aren't generally until near the end of the pregnacy when most mum's would already started their maternity leave...

    The overseeing of diabetic pregnant mums are a lot better now adays than it used to be, as now most hosptials will have a specialist anti-natal clinic where they gather the verious consultants and medcial team for several common chronic medical conditions, such as diabetes, asthma etc.. So mums only have to attend one clinic and all aspect well be coverd..

    This is a lot better than when I had my children and having to attend 2 different clinics, the diabetic and anital natal clinic...

    When you are ready to start to think/plan a family it's important to speak to your diabetic team, as again most hospitals have a diabetic pre-pregnancy clinic for diabetics, were they go through all aspects of pregnancy for diabetics any risks etc, and work closely with you to get your diabetic control into a very good position for a sucessful pregnancy..
     
  6. josie38

    josie38 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi,

    When i had my kids, I had a scan as soon as i found out, scan at 12 weeks and 20 weeks, growth scans every two weeks from 24 weeks onwards. I also had to go every two weeks to have blood sugars checked, HBA1C done every two weeks. Checks to make sure no protein in water and insulin levels were right.

    I was very well looked after as the antenatal clinic i attended was run by the consultant I saw at diabetic clinic.

    But i know the things i mentioned were done to every pregnant diabetic woman i saw at the hospital.

    josie
     
  7. the_anticarb

    the_anticarb · Well-Known Member

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    Hi - stipulation in the NICE guidelines is for weekly CONTACT not weekly visits, when pregnant and diabetic. I was going to the hospital around once every four weeks in the beginning, up to once every two weeks by the end. I would phone in my blood sugar results each week and get advice over the phone. Only if there was a problem that couldn't be resolved over the phone would I go in in addition to these times. YOu are legally entitled to paid time off for antenatal care so don't worry about that.

    Towards the end i found it hard to work, due to frequent daily hypos, so I stopped at 31 weeks, although if I'd had to stay a bit longer I probably could have (my boss adapted my role so that I wasn't partaking in meetings during hypo danger times towards the end). I took annual leave for five weeks then started my maternity leave at week 36 - induced at 38 weeks.

    If it is not safe for you to do your job whilst pregnant without it endangering your health, your employer will be obliged to adapt your role, or if unable to do so suspend you on full pay, whilst you are pregnant (I work in HR btw!). These are legal rights.

    I found that my employer was very sympathetic to me, despite my frequent hypos, no one ever said anything (except one girl in payroll who made a sarky comment when I went down to half days towards the end, I told her where to go). I think they were just concerned for my welfare esp when I collapsed one day with a blood sugar of 2.3, but although my boss suggested I take early mat leave at that point, it was never forced upon me. I also found educating my immediate colleagues in what a hypo was, how to treat it etc was useful.
     
  8. josie38

    josie38 · Well-Known Member

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    HI,

    I told of my experience and everyone is different. I had my children 2 years apart and nothing changed with child no 2. I had T1 for 9 years before i got pregnant.

    There is a difference in health care trusts so it could be that one person could go once a month and another go every 2 weeks. Its whatever suits the individual person.

    Josie
     
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