1. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android.
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Guest, we'd love to know what you think about the forum! Take the Diabetes Forum Survey 2021 »
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Diabetes Forum should not be used in an emergency and does not replace your healthcare professional relationship. Posts can be seen by the public.
    Dismiss Notice
  4. Guest, stay home, stay safe, save the NHS. Stay up to date with information about keeping yourself and people around you safe here and GOV.UK: Coronavirus (COVID-19). Think you have symptoms? NHS 111 service is available here.
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community »

Diabetes discrimination at work - advice needed!

Discussion in 'Diabetes Discussions' started by Rickmac1988, Jan 15, 2019.

  1. LeftPeg

    LeftPeg · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    117
    Likes Received:
    306
    Trophy Points:
    103
    There's a difference between standing up for yourself and raising a formal grievance.
     
    • Agree Agree x 3
  2. lovinglife

    lovinglife Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,913
    Likes Received:
    2,505
    Trophy Points:
    198
    To be fair you did ask the question if you were over reacting - whilst I agree it was unpleasant and yes he shouldn't have mentioned your condition in front of your colleagues I still think you are hugely overreacting and possibly not getting the advice from some forum members you want to hear.

    It's your choice exactly what you do but you need to pick your battles - is it really worth kicking up a stink for - why don't you just approach him and say politely and concisely what and why you are upset and then draw a line. It will be easier and far less stressful - if what he did upset you to this extent how are you going to cope with a full blown formal complaint? All the meetings, independent reviews, appeals etc
     
    • Agree Agree x 2
  3. Circuspony

    Circuspony Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    857
    Likes Received:
    488
    Trophy Points:
    103
    I think you're over-reacting. The Director saw you put a clashing meeting in the diary, didn't know what it was for (you can't expect people to remember an email you sent out a week before), came to speak to you, didn't handle it very well and has since apologised.

    I pressed reject on a call yesterday when I was sat in the waiting room at the hospital, it was quickly followed up by a grumpy email from the Director concerned and then about 10 mins later one saying 'sorry - forgot you had a hospital appointment today'. I though absolutely nothing of it. I don't expect him to remember my appointments, even though I'd reminded him the day before that I wouldn't be in work.

    Complete mis-use of the grievance procedure in my opinion - just a badly handled misunderstanding.
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Agree Agree x 1
    • Winner Winner x 1
  4. Rustytypin

    Rustytypin Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    366
    Likes Received:
    296
    Trophy Points:
    103
    Hi Rick,
    Many years ago I worked for a small firm, where my line manager was a bully. He would frequently criticise my work in front of my staff, until one day I snapped and had a go back at him. Things calmed down after that but our working relationship was never the same. Like you I felt humiliated and very upset. I did however continue working at the firm for another 20 years as I had a good working time with everybody else. I can sympathise with your dilemma but in the situation you find yourself, I think it would be best to draw a line and accept the email apology. As others have said even if you leave, a reference could hint at you "being a difficult employee".
    Yes working with a **** can be difficult , but the world has many of them. Very often they get where they are because of the "Peter Principle" and are unable to handle the workload that comes with responsibility .
    By the way, having Type 1 is in no way a shameful or embarrassing condition. It is what it is.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  5. lucylocket61

    lucylocket61 Type 2 · Expert

    Messages:
    5,459
    Likes Received:
    2,332
    Trophy Points:
    178
    I appreciate you are still upset, but there is a huge gulf between what is being advised on here, and your statement I have quoted above.

    I run two businesses, have done for over 25 years, developing a sense of proportion and avoiding black and white thinking is a good thing.
     
  6. tim2000s

    tim2000s Type 1 · Expert
    Retired Moderator

    Messages:
    8,914
    Likes Received:
    11,784
    Trophy Points:
    198
    If you read through the responses, you'll see that nobody thinks his behaviour was acceptable. However very few (very experienced) people think that taking this all the way up to legal proceedings is a good idea.

    Discrimination in any form includes a definition of "Harassment":
    - Taken from the ACAS website, and I think you could deem that you have experienced that in this case.

    The ACAS website also recommends that it is best to talk to your employer first and try and resolve the problem informally, which it appears you are now beyond.

    In almost every case I can find, a discrimination complain is upheld only if it happens again after a complaint has been made to the employer and it can be proven that the employer has not done enough to stop it happening again. In addition, the recommendation is always to take both employer and employee to a tribunal.

    Can I ask what outcome you want from taking this further?
     
    • Like Like x 2
    • Agree Agree x 1
  7. Rickmac1988

    Rickmac1988 Type 1 · Active Member

    Messages:
    38
    Likes Received:
    33
    Trophy Points:
    58
    Hi @tim2000s ,

    That's a good point to be honest, not really sure what the outcome would be. Just to be spoken to with respect in the place of work and not be humiliated/ outed in front of peers. After having time to think about it and spending the day at home I'm just gonna draw a line under it as basically can't be bothered going through the effort of it all and don't see a long term future there anyway.
     
    • Like Like x 3
    • Agree Agree x 1
  8. HSSS

    HSSS Type 2 · Expert

    Messages:
    5,408
    Likes Received:
    2,670
    Trophy Points:
    198
    I think you have a ****** manager and you’re overreacting. Was he one of those that got your first message a week ago? Is there a reason it didn’t go in the diary then? When was the meeting set? All relevant. He then handled approaching you badly. I totally understand the upset, shaking, leaving the office and calling him out. I’m not sure why you should feel ashamed for his actions or your diabetes though. I understand your not replying to his apology but not reading it at all wasn’t helpful.

    He shouldn’t have spoken to you rudely or aggressively and ideally not inconsiderately or inappropriately about personal medical matters. It’s human nature not to remehmber every fact about every individual sadly. Not wanting to go back to work over this isolated event isn’t being particularly resilient. If it’s a habit or pattern on his part perhaps that’s different . What makes you think your company allow or endorse this behaviour? How was it degrading? I’d say everyone thinks worse of him not you from what you’ve said.

    Personally I think you are right to challenge him but a formal complaint in these circumstances isn’t what the spirit of the legislation is about in my opinion. It smacks of money grabbing financial gain rather than real ingrained problems or serious issues. Informal, internal approaches have to be the first step at re-educating managers. Formal approaches only when they fail. Surely you wouldn’t want all your work mistakes to go straight to discipline action without something coming first.

    It’s your call entirely but you asked our opinion. Maybe you need to decide what you think is the best outcome and how best to achieve that.
     
    • Agree Agree x 2
    • Like Like x 1
  9. KK123

    KK123 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,657
    Likes Received:
    2,331
    Trophy Points:
    198
    Hi Rick, I haven't read a single comment that even implies people think his behaviour is ok, of course it's not. I think when you ask a specific question and get answers that don't fit with your way of thinking or dealing with something then you probably have to accept not everybody thinks the same. Of course you can take legal action if you want, that is your choice. Good luck with it all anyway. x
     
  10. DCUKMod

    DCUKMod I reversed my Type 2 · Master
    Staff Member Administrator

    Messages:
    14,302
    Likes Received:
    8,226
    Trophy Points:
    298
    Rickimac - I think your decision is a good one.

    I would however suggest you diarise what happened, and maybe make a few notes about date, time, who was present and so on, then just file that away.

    When the time comes in the future when something similar could happen, in your shoes, I might, as well as putting the appointment in whatever logging system you use, I might be inclined to spend a very specific email to your line manager, with the subject matter of something like, "Medical Appointment - 6th June 2018" (or whatever), so that anyone scanning will clearly see it. I would also ask my line manager to share it with other managers on a "need to know" basis.

    Should another meeting crop up, such as this time, I would repeat the process, and include interested parties yourself.

    I'm not suggesting your email should be incredibly fullsome, and certainly wouldn't suggest you get very specific, but you can, with some thought, make it clear the appoinment is important and that it relates to a medical condition of which they are aware.

    Of course, in an ideal world, the guy should have remembered, but for all we know he was just panicked, thinking about who would attend in your stead. You could even consider that he appreciates to work you do and was concluding the meeting would be the poorer for your absence. We're all human and therefore sometimes can be real pains in the pants. He's no different.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
    #30 DCUKMod, Jan 16, 2019 at 5:58 PM
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2019
  11. Robinredbreast

    Robinredbreast Type 1 · Oracle

    Messages:
    18,448
    Likes Received:
    27,588
    Trophy Points:
    298
    Best thing to do now @Rickmac1988 draw a line under it, hold your head up and move on. Unfortunately there are a lot of crass individual's about, especially in the workplace who just love lording it over other's.
    Good luck for the future.
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Agree Agree x 1
  • Meet the Community

    Find support, connect with others, ask questions and share your experiences with people with diabetes, their carers and family.

    Did you know: 7 out of 10 people improve their understanding of diabetes within 6 months of being a Diabetes Forum member. Get the Diabetes Forum App and stay connected on iOS and Android

    Grab the app!
  • Tweet with us

  • Like us on Facebook