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Diabetes Friendly Allotment or Vegetable Patch - What to grow?

Discussion in 'Food, Nutrition and Recipes' started by DaveH2, Oct 21, 2019.

  1. DaveH2

    DaveH2 · Well-Known Member

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    OK, here's a summary so far :)

    There is some crossover with "salad" veg and "normal" veg, but I have only mentioned the items once.

    Salad veg:
    Lettuce
    Radish
    Cucumber (Marketmore)
    Cherry Tomato
    Tomato (Gardeners' Delight or Sungold)

    Veg
    Brocolli
    Cauliflower
    Kale
    Swiss Chard
    Summer Squash
    Courgette
    Garlic

    Low Sugar Fruits
    Raspberry
    Strawberry
    Blackberry
     
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  2. Hotpepper20000

    Hotpepper20000 · Well-Known Member

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    Any Bush cucumbers or determinant tomatoes. They won’t grow too tall and need staking.
     
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  3. Tipetoo

    Tipetoo Type 2 · Expert

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    Don't forget the herbs.
     
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  4. bulkbiker

    bulkbiker Type 2 · Master

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    Chickens?
     
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  5. DaveH2

    DaveH2 · Well-Known Member

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    I did!

    These seem the easiest to grow unless there's any other suggestions?

    Rosemary
    Parsley
    Chives
    Thyme
    Sage
     
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  6. Hotpepper20000

    Hotpepper20000 · Well-Known Member

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    Basil
    Mint
     
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  7. Tipetoo

    Tipetoo Type 2 · Expert

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    Oregano
    Marjoram

    I think they need somewhere warmer to grow though...
     
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  8. DaveH2

    DaveH2 · Well-Known Member

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    Mint gets everywhere! And Basil doesn't survive the cold very well, does it? (I'm not a gardener, so I might be wrong!)
     
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  9. DaveH2

    DaveH2 · Well-Known Member

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    Might be a bit too tricky if they need to stay in a greenhouse - there will be a greenhouse and I'm sure someone will grow some, but maybe not in my "diabetic plot" :)
     
  10. Mike D

    Mike D Type 2 · Expert

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    Watch the rosemary .... can get out of control
     
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  11. DaveH2

    DaveH2 · Well-Known Member

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    Is it a bit like mint that way?

    It does need to be an "easy" garden, not only for the school kids, but also for me!
     
  12. Mike D

    Mike D Type 2 · Expert

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    No ... but it gets very "woody"
     
  13. Resurgam

    Resurgam Type 2 (in remission!) · Expert

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    there are also beetroot, celery, celeriac, daikon radish aka long white icicle, spring and ordinary onions, chives, leeks, cauliflower - all fairly easy to grow though some need a bit of protection from pests.
     
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  14. SlimLizzy

    SlimLizzy Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    I would vote for mangetout. Easy to grow. Lower carb than peas. Versatile, can be eaten raw in salad, (if you manage to get home without eating them all) added to stirfrys and steamed as a side dish. AND expensive to buy.
    Could try celariac too. But think that might be prone to pests.
     
  15. SlimLizzy

    SlimLizzy Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    Marjoram was growing wild all over my garden in uk. Died back in the winter, some survived, others didn't, but new plants appeared self seeded.
    Basil won't make it through the winter, will need to be grown from seed each year. Good introduction to the concept of hardy or annual plants. Thyme and sage for contrast are perennials.
     
  16. Robbity

    Robbity Type 2 · Expert

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    I'd add gooseberries, black & red currants and rhubarb to my list of suitable fruit; and have a minimum of three varieties of raspberries to cover early, mid and late season crops. (I used to do this but it's so long since I've been "allowed" to grow fruit, I can't remember which ones I had, but try here for lists. Blueberries can be grown - possibly in tubs if soil conditions aren't right. And how about some tiny Alpine strawberries for the children?

    Black/moroccan mint or peppermint for mint teas. Growing mint in a tub would prevent it from rampaging...

    And don't forget the Brussels sprouts!!:D

    Robbity
     
  17. mouseee

    mouseee · Well-Known Member

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    Also, dont grow everything from seed. Talk to local garden centres and see what they could donate. I did a school garden like this. Alongside planting seeds we planted plants like courgettes (although these are easy to grow from seed ) and broccoli as we needed instant green things for the children to see too!
     
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