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Diabetic musicians

Discussion in 'Jobs and Employment' started by garinsionfitter, Jun 23, 2017.

  1. alf_Josiah

    alf_Josiah Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I'm an aspiring keyboard player does that count? I took up the keyboard at the age of 60. I have regular lessons which I enjoy. Musically my catch phrase is " I'm like Andy Preview but all of wrong notes in all of wrong places " .
     
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  2. Grant_Vicat

    Grant_Vicat Don't have diabetes · Well-Known Member

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    Look forward to hearing you with The New Eric and Ernie"!
     
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  3. Japes

    Japes LADA · Well-Known Member

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    Just off to discover if I've got the balance of eating and insulin correct for being on the organ stool from 12 - 3pm. It's my first year on insulin and I'd prefer not to have a hypo during those 3 hours! But, I don't want to be hyper either as my eyes go fuzzy and that makes music reading interesting.

    Mind you, as I've been handed the same hymn list which has used for the last four years, I think I can safely say I know what we're doing. Sighs and ponders the subtle plan of campaign for changes for next year.... I'll see if anyone else notices.
     
  4. Grant_Vicat

    Grant_Vicat Don't have diabetes · Well-Known Member

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    Hi @Japes I have just escaped from the 8th identical Good Friday service since 2011... See #19 for hypo at the organ! Happy Easter.
     
  5. Japes

    Japes LADA · Well-Known Member

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    I thought I was hard done by with the 4th! I read all the hymns I'd love to sing but which never get chosen (except by me, at other appropriate times - I do the regular Sundays hymn choosing but some services the Vicar does.) during the silences.

    I remember reading about your dramatic hypo and collapse into the arms of the acolyte when you posted it... Think that may have been at the back of my mind when I was asked to miss breakfast one morning by the nurse when I was newly on insulin a few weeks ago, and she suggested Sunday would be a good day until I told her firmly I wasn't having any hypo at the organ that I could avoid, thank you very much.

    I'll return the greetings tomorrow... I've got a couple more services to go before I can get into Easter mode.
     
  6. mrsspenny

    mrsspenny Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi, I am new to the forum, couple of years type 2, classical, opera and choral singer (sometimes paid but mostly not!) and have joined because i am pretty **** at controlling my diet so am looking for inspiration
     
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  7. Japes

    Japes LADA · Well-Known Member

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    Happy Easter!

    All services managed well, though one member of my congregation nearly got my candid opinion as she disapprovingly told me "I thought YOU weren't allowed to eat THAT." I merely smiled and said I could eat what I wanted, as long as I dealt with it correctly. ("That" being a tiny milk chocolate egg which I was being offered by one of the children to whom I'd been explaining I was going to try a tiny egg to see if I liked it as I'd not liked any other milk chocolate I'd recently tried tiny pieces of - Said child had bailed me out of the Twix debacle a couple of weeks ago by eating up the other half of the Twix I didn't want to eat!)
     
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  8. Grant_Vicat

    Grant_Vicat Don't have diabetes · Well-Known Member

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    First service ghastly, even though I have the use of a wonderful 20 stop 1891 Nicholson & Lord. Second service was wonderful, except that the organ was sweet but uninspiring. At the end (Lefebvre-Wely Sortie in Eb) a lady came up to me with a large Red Riding Hood basket stuffed full of Easter eggs. "Oh, sorry, you can't eat these can you?" I helped myself to a pink one and she questioned my orientation! Keep up the excellent work!
     
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  9. Japes

    Japes LADA · Well-Known Member

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    Welcome to the forum @mrsspenny . Apologies for missing your post, and for not welcoming you!

    I'll tag @daisy1 who has helpful information for new members.

    I was originally diagnosed Type 2, but that's now being questioned, and I'm on insulin rather than diet controlled/tablets. But, when I was diet controlled, eating as few carbohydrates as possible helped a lot. I'm still inclined to that, as it's very clear too many carbs of the wrong kind of carbs for me makes me feel very unwell, but am working out how few I can get away with now I'm on insulin!
     
  10. Japes

    Japes LADA · Well-Known Member

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    Nothing wrong with pink if you like it. Me, I had a blue one, which Child approved of as "You wear a lot of blue."
     
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  11. Grant_Vicat

    Grant_Vicat Don't have diabetes · Well-Known Member

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    Mine tasted blue
     
  12. mrsspenny

    mrsspenny Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Thankyou for the warm welcome Japes . I know what you mean about the carbs, I love them so much but i do feel better if I avoid excess. I am really trying hard to follow a low carb diet as a result of my recent disastrous blood tests and am back to my GP to reassess management on Tuesday so will soon see the way forward. It would be nice to think that I will have more energy for my singing once I am stabilised. Enjoy the rest of the Easter weekend!
     
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  13. daisy1

    daisy1 Type 2 · Legend
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    @garinsionfitter @mrsspenny

    Hello and welcome to the Forum :) Here is the Basic Information we give to new members and I hope you will find it useful. Ask as many questions as you want and someone will be able to help.


    BASIC INFORMATION FOR NEW MEMBERS

    Diabetes is the general term to describe people who have blood that is sweeter than normal. A number of different types of diabetes exist.

    A diagnosis of diabetes tends to be a big shock for most of us. It’s far from the end of the world though and on this forum you'll find well over 235,000 people who are demonstrating this.

    On the forum we have found that with the number of new people being diagnosed with diabetes each day, sometimes the NHS is not being able to give all the advice it would perhaps like to deliver - particularly with regards to people with type 2 diabetes.

    The role of carbohydrate

    Carbohydrates are a factor in diabetes because they ultimately break down into sugar (glucose) within our blood. We then need enough insulin to either convert the blood sugar into energy for our body, or to store the blood sugar as body fat.

    If the amount of carbohydrate we take in is more than our body’s own (or injected) insulin can cope with, then our blood sugar will rise.

    The bad news

    Research indicates that raised blood sugar levels over a period of years can lead to organ damage, commonly referred to as diabetic complications.

    The good news

    People on the forum here have shown that there is plenty of opportunity to keep blood sugar levels from going too high. It’s a daily task but it’s within our reach and it’s well worth the effort.

    Controlling your carbs

    The info below is primarily aimed at people with type 2 diabetes, however, it may also be of benefit for other types of diabetes as well.

    There are two approaches to controlling your carbs:
    • Reduce your carbohydrate intake
    • Choose ‘better’ carbohydrates
    Reduce your carbohydrates

    A large number of people on this forum have chosen to reduce the amount of carbohydrates they eat as they have found this to be an effective way of improving (lowering) their blood sugar levels.

    The carbohydrates which tend to have the most pronounced effect on blood sugar levels tend to be starchy carbohydrates such as rice, pasta, bread, potatoes and similar root vegetables, flour based products (pastry, cakes, biscuits, battered food etc) and certain fruits.

    Choosing better carbohydrates

    The low glycaemic index diet is often favoured by healthcare professionals but some people with diabetes find that low GI does not help their blood sugar enough and may wish to cut out these foods altogether.

    Read more on carbohydrates and diabetes.

    Over 145,000 people have taken part in the Low Carb Program - a 10 week structured education course that is helping people lose weight and reduce medication dependency by explaining the science behind carbs, insulin and GI.

    Eating what works for you

    Different people respond differently to different types of food. What works for one person may not work so well for another. The best way to see which foods are working for you is to test your blood sugar with a glucose meter.

    To be able to see what effect a particular type of food or meal has on your blood sugar is to do a test before the meal and then test after the meal. A test 2 hours after the meal gives a good idea of how your body has reacted to the meal.

    The blood sugar ranges recommended by NICE are as follows:

    Blood glucose ranges for type 2 diabetes
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 8.5 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (adults)
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 9 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (children)
    • Before meals: 4 to 8 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 10 mmol/l
    However, those that are able to, may wish to keep blood sugar levels below the NICE after meal targets.

    Access to blood glucose test strips

    The NICE guidelines suggest that people newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes should be offered:
    • structured education to every person and/or their carer at and around the time of diagnosis, with annual reinforcement and review
    • self-monitoring of plasma glucose to a person newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes only as an integral part of his or her self-management education

    Therefore both structured education and self-monitoring of blood glucose should be offered to people with type 2 diabetes. Read more on getting access to blood glucose testing supplies.

    You may also be interested to read questions to ask at a diabetic clinic.

    Note: This post has been edited from Sue/Ken's post to include up to date information.
    Take part in Diabetes.co.uk digital education programs and improve your understanding. Most of these are free.

    • Low Carb Program - it's made front-page news of the New Scientist and The Times. Developed with 20,000 people with type 2 diabetes; 96% of people who take part recommend it... find out why

    • Hypo Program - improve your understanding of hypos. There's a version for people with diabetes, parents/guardians of children with type 1, children with type 1 diabetes, teachers and HCPs.
     
  14. mrsspenny

    mrsspenny Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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  15. Jaylee

    Jaylee Type 1 · Expert
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    Hi @mrsspenny ,

    Welcome to the forum!

    I fully appreciate keeping the blood sugars at an optimum level when performing.

    Regarding diet. Have you got a blood test meter? You will be surprised the effects of certain food on the system.
    & may have a few pleasant surprises some foods don't..
    A meter is certainly a great tool with your day to day diabetes management..

    Regards,

    J>
     
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  16. AdamJames

    AdamJames Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I bought a classical guitar last year with a view to learning how to play it, and am now certain that I am not a diabetic musician. But I am diabetic.
     
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  17. Oldvatr

    Oldvatr Other · Well-Known Member

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    My T1D buddy and I play blues and chicago acoustic such as the Stones, The Who, Motorhead, We call ourselves the Diabolicals. We have been known to do some Pink Floyd, Doors, and even Led Zepp all as acoustic numbers, Our sets usually last 3 hours non stop, and only break when my buddy has a hypo on stage. I have been playing in bands for 50 years now,
     
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  18. mrsspenny

    mrsspenny Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi Jaylee, thankyou for the warm welcome. I do have a meter and have started to use it three times a day since I started following the low carb programme. I am certainly learning a lot about what to eat and todays supermarket shop looked very different to the one I did two weeks ago, lol. I have some concerts coming up soon in France so hope to be more under control by then!
     
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  19. Diane fluteplayer

    Diane fluteplayer Type 1 · Active Member

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    Hi. I play flute for folk dancing (mostly unpaid these days since the guy I used to play with as a duo moved up North - a long way... ) I too go to Sidmouth most years ( mainly concert band and playing for dance workshops and downstairs at the rugby club with the loose knit band in evenings, where I catch up with friends! I also sing with an amateur opera company near home. So far no probs with gigs although I did once go hypo in the middle of the Messiah in Peterborough cathedral- terrifying: I was in the middle of a row and couldn’t get out. Made it to the interval but now I always take a small, black handbag on stage for concerts, regardless of rules. Opera is fine as you’re Ona and off stage a lot and I keep a snack in the wings. Little cartons of f out juice are handy (150 ml) great to know there is such a range of musicians on the forum!
     
  20. mrsspenny

    mrsspenny Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi Diane, welcome from a fellow opera lover x Karen
     
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