1. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android.
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Guest, we'd love to know what you think about the forum! Take the Diabetes Forum Survey 2020 »
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Diabetes Forum should not be used in an emergency and does not replace your healthcare professional relationship. Posts can be seen by the public.
    Dismiss Notice
  4. Guest, stay home, stay safe, save the NHS. Stay up to date with information about keeping yourself and people around you safe here and GOV.UK: Coronavirus (COVID-19). Think you have symptoms? NHS 111 service is available here.
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community »

Diabetics R Us

Discussion in 'Diabetes Discussions' started by archersuz, Jun 11, 2018.

  1. SaskiaKC

    SaskiaKC Type 2 · Expert

    Messages:
    5,976
    Likes Received:
    19,142
    Trophy Points:
    198
    Thanks again for the links, @JohnEGreen . The FT wouldn't let me in but the Independent did, and was very interesting, even to posting a final statement on the pronunciation of "scone." (And over here, rhyming that with "gone" would get some varying regional pronunciations!) ;)
     
    • Like Like x 1
  2. Antje77

    Antje77 LADA · Moderator
    Staff Member

    Messages:
    7,396
    Likes Received:
    4,966
    Trophy Points:
    198
    I may have to start having elevenses now I know that is actually a word. I mean, I've been looking forward to having my eleventy-first birthday since I was old enough to read fat books in English, but having elevenses might be a more realistic life goal than celebrating your eleventy-first birthday. And I can accomplish it tomorrow instead of waiting another 69 years :)


    It does. Bijt means to bite, and is pronounced very similarly (ij is our extra vowel. I't's reffered to as a letter and if it's used in a word starting with a capital the whole thing turns capital. IJs means ice for instance. Old mechanical typewriters have an ij key.).
    Ont is apparently an old prefix meaning something like 'before'. A before eating food food or such.
    What?
     
    • Like Like x 1
  3. SaskiaKC

    SaskiaKC Type 2 · Expert

    Messages:
    5,976
    Likes Received:
    19,142
    Trophy Points:
    198
    It seems like the character of North England and the people who live there are sometimes compared to the working class, while people of South England are more "upper" class. In America, sometimes the South is equated with "lower class" or working class, while the North is considered more "upper class." That's my very simplified effort at trying to explain what I mean, because now as I'm trying to explain it I find it seems very complex.

    I'm generalizing, based on impressions I've gotten over the years of reading various writings. To me it seems like "polar opposites" -- the character of northern England seems to be regarded in the same way as the southern US (particularly the Southeast), while southern or southeast England seems, by comparison, more like the American north.

    @JohnEGreen if you read this, will you please chime in and tell me if I've got it completely wrong?
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  4. SaskiaKC

    SaskiaKC Type 2 · Expert

    Messages:
    5,976
    Likes Received:
    19,142
    Trophy Points:
    198
    One of my Dutch great-grandfathers had the ij letter in his surname.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  5. Mike d

    Mike d Type 2 · Expert

    Messages:
    7,827
    Likes Received:
    11,205
    Trophy Points:
    198
    Could say the same thing about West and East coast America
     
    • Like Like x 1
  6. carty

    carty Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,175
    Likes Received:
    1,997
    Trophy Points:
    178
    If you are offering a cup of tea or coffee in Lancashire you ask your guests if they would like a brew :)
    Carol
     
    • Agree Agree x 2
    • Informative Informative x 2
  7. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 (in remission!) · Guru

    Messages:
    24,890
    Likes Received:
    30,454
    Trophy Points:
    298
    Well I must be the lowest of the low in the class system!

    I was born, brought up, and continue to live in the north of England. 71 years of northernness.
    We have breakfast, elevensies, dinner, tea, supper in that order. Supper is last thing before bed, and normally is just a hot drink with biscuits or a sandwich.

    To avoid confusion on the forum I refer to tea as evening meal, but would never use that phrase outside the forum.

    As I understand it, the meal "tea" originated from "afternoon tea", which still exists as a meal and normally involves cream cakes, crustless sandwiches, and a pot of tea. This is still served in cafes and hotels all over the country mid afternoon.

    As for vests, they are worn next to the skin for extra warmth. Waistcoats are sleeveless, short to the waist, and buttoned up the front. They are worn over the shirt and under a jacket. Do not get me started on liberty bodices. Dreadful invention for little girls. In my days all little girls wore them until they were "big enough" for a bra.
     
    • Informative Informative x 3
  8. carty

    carty Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,175
    Likes Received:
    1,997
    Trophy Points:
    178
    I used to hide my liberty bodice under my mattress and put it out for washing once a week !!
    I was born in Burnley and lived in Blackburn until I married and now back in Wilpshire
    I speak Lanky .mostly but can talk posh when necessary :angelic:
    Carol
     
    • Like Like x 2
    • Informative Informative x 1
  9. Antje77

    Antje77 LADA · Moderator
    Staff Member

    Messages:
    7,396
    Likes Received:
    4,966
    Trophy Points:
    198
    Ah, north and south from a social geographical point of view, makes sense now. It would have made sense with your first post too, if I had paid a bit more attention while reading. But my inner sleepy sailor got stuck at north and south in navigational terms and wandered off to thoughts like 'where exactly on the Atlantic do you turn your compass' and 'does the sun come up in the west if you reverse the poles'.
    They were the perfect mind wanderings to fall asleep with, thanks for that!
    Thank you!
     
    • Like Like x 2
    • Friendly Friendly x 1
  10. SaskiaKC

    SaskiaKC Type 2 · Expert

    Messages:
    5,976
    Likes Received:
    19,142
    Trophy Points:
    198
    In contrast to the Midwest? Good ol' Middle America. :)
     
    • Like Like x 1
  11. SaskiaKC

    SaskiaKC Type 2 · Expert

    Messages:
    5,976
    Likes Received:
    19,142
    Trophy Points:
    198
    I think I am classed right with you as I was born, brought up, and still live in the Southeastern US. 67 years a Southerner, and counting! :)

    (I wish I could get you started on liberty bodices as I have read that term in Miss Read's novels and never had any idea what they were.) ;) ETA: one of Miss Read's schoolteachers wore "spencer" for an extra layer of warmth. Whatever that is ...
     
    • Like Like x 1
  12. JohnEGreen

    JohnEGreen Other · Master

    Messages:
    10,652
    Likes Received:
    21,042
    Trophy Points:
    298
    But which is which.
     
    • Agree Agree x 2
  13. carty

    carty Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,175
    Likes Received:
    1,997
    Trophy Points:
    178
    How many ways to describe a bread roll
    Teacake
    Barmcake
    Bap
    Oven bottom cake
    Probably many others these are Northern ones
    Carol
     
    • Informative Informative x 2
    • Like Like x 1
  14. carty

    carty Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,175
    Likes Received:
    1,997
    Trophy Points:
    178
    As far as I remember liberty bodices were a fleecy type of vest worn next to the skin with rubber buttons down the front Must have been invented by a man with a warped sense of humour
    Carol
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
    • Informative Informative x 1
    • Hug Hug x 1
  15. Antje77

    Antje77 LADA · Moderator
    Staff Member

    Messages:
    7,396
    Likes Received:
    4,966
    Trophy Points:
    198
    Depends on where your north is, doesn't it?
     
    • Like Like x 1
  16. JohnEGreen

    JohnEGreen Other · Master

    Messages:
    10,652
    Likes Received:
    21,042
    Trophy Points:
    298
    yes but which is considered upper class and which lower west or east.
     
    • Like Like x 2
  17. SaskiaKC

    SaskiaKC Type 2 · Expert

    Messages:
    5,976
    Likes Received:
    19,142
    Trophy Points:
    198
    I think some people consider the two coasts "better" than the Midwest (basically the 3,000 or so miles between the Atlantic Seaboard and the Pacific). And then they break down the two "Coasts" into New York City and Los Angeles. As if everything in between were a desert or just empty Great Plains, and forgetting that Boston, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Charleston, Savannah, and Miami are also on the East Coast, and that Seattle, San Francisco, and San Diego are all on the West.

    ETA: So I guess those people would consider both coasts "upper class" compared to the rest of the country. Why, I have no idea. :)
     
    • Informative Informative x 1
    #4657 SaskiaKC, Sep 15, 2019 at 10:40 PM
    Last edited: Sep 15, 2019
  18. JohnEGreen

    JohnEGreen Other · Master

    Messages:
    10,652
    Likes Received:
    21,042
    Trophy Points:
    298
    I had a cousin who though born in Staffordshire in England ended up living in Denver he was the Episcopalian Bishop of Colorado tho am not sure what status that would give him.

    I recon he would have said tea time not dinner time.

    BTW I was born in Liverpool brought up in the southwest Devon and had no end of trouble when first on the forum working out just what people meant by dinner or lunch or teatime.
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Informative Informative x 1
    #4658 JohnEGreen, Sep 16, 2019 at 10:30 AM
    Last edited: Sep 16, 2019
  19. JohnEGreen

    JohnEGreen Other · Master

    Messages:
    10,652
    Likes Received:
    21,042
    Trophy Points:
    298
    You live and learn this may sound daft but I have only just cottoned on to what those little patches of material that sometimes come with new clothes , are actually for.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  20. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 (in remission!) · Guru

    Messages:
    24,890
    Likes Received:
    30,454
    Trophy Points:
    298
    I am always confused by this. To me they are barmcakes or tea cakes, but I find so many people these days don't know what barmcake means. I never call them baps, and wasn't sure what that meant when I fist heard the word. Bread rolls, to me, are long, like baguettes but smaller, and should be crusty. Barmcakes are round and soft, like the bread that comes with burgers.
     
    • Informative Informative x 1
  • Meet the Community

    Find support, connect with others, ask questions and share your experiences with people with diabetes, their carers and family.

    Did you know: 7 out of 10 people improve their understanding of diabetes within 6 months of being a Diabetes Forum member. Get the Diabetes Forum App and stay connected on iOS and Android

    Grab the app!
  • Tweet with us

  • Like us on Facebook