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Dietition......

Discussion in 'Diabetes Discussions' started by DiabetiesChild, Aug 19, 2008.

  1. DiabetiesChild

    DiabetiesChild · Active Member

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    the dietition visited today and she is reali pleased with the progress ive made. and she said if i keep working hard my HAB1C will come down from what my last one was ( 11.7 )
     
  2. sugarless sue

    sugarless sue · Master

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    What did your dietician tell you, Diabetes child? I have no experience with children with diabetes and it would be interesting to hear.
     
  3. DiabetiesChild

    DiabetiesChild · Active Member

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    well as you no ive been controling my diabetes sooo much better now my BS are always round 5. I eat a lot of carbs but she said not to worry about. i was really worried coz everyone says you should carb count but she said not to bother but to cut back on the cheese and try more veg and more fruit and we talked about how to eat healthy but with the food i like.

    she also said that my diabetic nurse will be very proud of me beacuse i had a two year honeymoon period and then this last my readings have been about/above 14 most of the time or really low at 1. and my HAB1C shows that my readings are 17. so she said to carry on what im doing and my HAB1C should come down.
     
  4. Katharine

    Katharine · Well-Known Member

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    I know it can feel like a chore learning about carbohydrates and how to adjust your insulin for it.

    Can your mum or dad or an older brother or sister help you with it?

    I don't think your blood sugars are likely to be as level and normal as you may like them to be unless you can adjust your insulin to different sorts of meals. If you eat the same things for every meal of course that would make adjustments easier.
     
  5. DiabetiesChild

    DiabetiesChild · Active Member

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    Hi this is Zoe's mum, Penny

    First of all a big thankyou to everyone for the support she has been given on here. Im sure it has helped her get her readings back to where they should be. Zoe asked me to respond to this post.

    We did try strict carb counting for a while but it really stressed Zoe out and after discussion with her medical team we relaxed a little. Whilst we dont count carbs exactly we are very aware of how Zoes blood sugar reacts with the foods she likes. She had a full food diary to show our dietician and she was happy that Zoe was eating sensible amount of what she does eat, carbs included, but that she did need to up her intake of fruit and vege.

    We discussed lots of ways to do this. For instance, we had stopped buying juice as it raises her blood sugar so quickly, but we are going to change the insulin regime to cope with a small glass of apple juice every day - one of her five portions!

    Zoe is doing really well after a difficult time and I am really proud of her. I think its time I joined this forum too!

    Thanks again

    Penny
     
  6. sugarless sue

    sugarless sue · Master

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    Thank you so much for replying Penny.We are all very aware of the growing needs of a child here and as such reluctant to advise anything which might not be suitable for her.I 'm glad that she is getting on so well and please feel free to join us as well.You can sift through all the info on here and decide if there is anything that can help reducing her BS without causing any problems .
     
  7. Katharine

    Katharine · Well-Known Member

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    Hi Penny and Zoe,

    Welcome to the forum. My son Steven is 16 and has had type one since he was 12. His last hbaic was 5.7 %. We manage by eating a very similar breakfast every day and have been carb counting for two and a half years since he went on a multiple daily injection regime. We find that this gives pretty good results. If this is too too stressful right now it can be picked up later when the time is right.It is much harder to get blood sugar control right on the button with girls than boys because of the effects of the menstrual cycle.

    Katharine.
     
  8. donnamum

    donnamum · Well-Known Member

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    Well done and keep up the good work.

    We carb count for my daughter, it can be difficult but we are a bit more relaxed about it now. I used to get really stressed, didn't wan to eat out as I countn't carb it. But you soon get the hang of it.

    My daughter is 9 and can carb most of her food. It wasn't a concious discesion to teacher her, we just worked it out together from day one. She also works out how much insulin, as she has different ratios of different meal times. This was more of an attempt to improve her times tables than anything else. She will even say if she thinks it is too much insulin.

    I think children take it on board much earier than their parents.
     
  9. ally5555

    ally5555 · Well-Known Member

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    I think kids handle things better than their parents - esp now a days with the internet! As adults we often see the negatives!

    When I worked in a paeds unit I used pictures and food models to teach kids - used to get kids to put pics on the fridge . It is easier now with digital cameras. Using weighing scales can be useful - could be a game with younger kids! TBH as a student i spent hours weighing food that is how we learnt to carb count!
     
  10. gaynor

    gaynor · Active Member

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    Hi all, my son is 4 and he was diagnosed with type 1 in March. We don't do any carb counting at all as our diabetic nurse has encouraged us to make sure he has his carbs. We adjust his inuslin accordingly to what food he has eaten and it seems to work really well. My son really loves his fruit and it is really difficult to stop him from eating it as they always have fruit snacks at pre-school. He eats at least 5 pieces a day. He has a different amount of insulin for every meal depending on what his eaten and taking into consideration that he will have a fruit snack mid morning and mid afternoon. We have always been told as long as his BS is between 4 and 8 then that is absolutely fine. We have an occassional high and an occassional low but all in all we seem to be keeping pretty stable. His first HBA1C in July which was 4 months after diagnosis was 6.5 which was fantastic and made me feel like as parents my husband and I are doing a good job. I can understand where you are coming from with the low carbing but surely it's not good to encourage kids to low carb. They do need their carbs for their energy. If my son doesn't have enough carbs and is having an active day then that is when he has a hypo. If he wasn't having carbs I don't think I would be able to work out how much insulin to give him because I have tried it and he either has a hypo or goes into double figures. Many of you may not agree with my comments but it is very difficult to tell children they can't have certain things. I am just grateful at the moment that we seem to be keeping him stable.
     
  11. sugarless sue

    sugarless sue · Master

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    Hi Gaynor let me make a statement here.None of us are saying that kids should low carb!In fact we are all very aware of the difference in diabetes in adults and children.While the older members advocate low carbing as a means of controlling type 2 and also helping type 1 we try and stay away from the notion of children doing this.Carb counting is ,I think,what is used by younger people.ie counting the amount of carbs and then off-setting it with the correct amount of insulin.
     
  12. ally5555

    ally5555 · Well-Known Member

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    perhaps sue that is where we have gone wrong in the past - not being tight with carb counting. But those of of you who are new to diabetes do not remember how difficult it was to control diabetes without meters!

    You are doing a great job with the kids - often diabetic kids have a much better diet than their friends.
     
  13. gaynor

    gaynor · Active Member

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    Hi to everyone, thanks for your comments.. I hope I didn't offend anyone with my last posting. I certainly didn't intend to. I was just trying to show that on the basal bolus regime you can more or less eat what you like (within reason) including carbs as long as you give yourself the correct dose of insulin. I have 3 children who are only 7, 5 and 4 and obviously I still have to allow them treats now and then. My son does manage to eat an odd bar of chocolate and he has had icecream over the summer and we do still manage to keep his BS within a normal range. Occasionally it does spike. I was just trying to show to other parents as long as you are careful 95% of the time their kids still can have the odd treat without causing too many problems. I spent the first 2 months constantly saying no, no, no because you have diabetes and can't have that. My nurse advised against this because she said this will cause him to resent his illness which obviously I don't want. Don't get me wrong I'm not saying it is easy. I am still having times when I get upset because my son is crying for a packet of sweets like his friends and I do have to say no to him and it has changed my life completely because I can't leave the house without checking I've got his bag with everything in it. It's a bit like having a baby again when you have to check that you have got their changing bag before leaving the house. I have to say I don't think I would have coped so well without the fantastic diabetic team that I have in my area. The diabetic specialist nurse in particular has been brilliant and is always just a phonecall away. Anyway once again please accept my apologies if I offended anyone.

    Gaynor
     
  14. sugarless sue

    sugarless sue · Master

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    I think you're doing marvellously ,Gaynor.You've obviously got the balance right and that's the most important thing.No ,you have nor offended anyone here.I am pleased that you have posted as we need more parents of type 1 children to come on board and share their knowledge and experience.As I said in my post,dealing with adults with diabetes is a lot different from dealing with a growing child.
     
  15. gaynor

    gaynor · Active Member

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    Hi Sue, just hope I am not getting too complacent about managing his regime so well. He is about to start school in September and I think this may put a spanner in the works. I didn't realise until reading other postings the difficulties some people have controling their BS. I was lucky because my son has always been such a healthy eater and sweets were only allowed once a week anyway so I don't think he has noticed too much of a difference in his diet. I do still have odd days where he can go up to double figures and I think well why he's had basically the same as the day before. Then other days he will have a hypo and he will have eaten the same as the day before and had the same insulin dose. If I can help any other parent I will gladly do it. But I think I will never stop learning. Some days he won't eat his food and I don't know how much insulin to give him and have to guess and it's either been not enough or too much. I actually don't think it will ever be easy. It has to be one of the most mind boggling and frustrating illness ever. I would agree that we do need to see some more type 1 parents on the forum because I don't personally know any other parent of a type 1 child and I feel I have no-one to talk to who understands what me and my family go through. I actually think you all are doing a great job and are giving wonderful support to people who need it. Thanks also Eddie for you really positive comments.

    Gaynor
     
  16. sugarless sue

    sugarless sue · Master

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    I think it will be a whole new learning curve when he goes to school because he is going to come into contact with lots of outside influences.Other children the teachers etc.I hope that the school he is going to has a good knowledge of diabetes and good policies for looking after the children.Have you asked at the school what their policies are in regards to diabetic children?
     
  17. chocoholic

    chocoholic · Well-Known Member

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    I think younger children are so accepting of things like diabetes. At a family tea the other day, my great nephew stepped into the kitchen just as i was injecting my insulin. "What's that?" he said. He is only 6 so I tired to keep it simple.I said " It's something called insulin and I have to inject this into my body because I have a part in my body that doesn't work properly and this helps it work better." :roll: He just replied "Oh I have a friend who has to do that at school too. He has to have snacks sometimes." Off he then toddled,humming to himself.
    Aw, don't you just love kids?
     
  18. gaynor

    gaynor · Active Member

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    I don't think that they have any policy as such in dealing with diabetics but his class teacher and teaching assistant are both happy to learn how to test his BS and do his injections once he goes full time in January. To start with when I collect him at lunch time (as they only start half day until afer christmas) I will be going in once all the other children have gone home and do his blood sugar to show them how to do it until they feel competent to do it themselves. Hopefully this won't take long otherwise he could have a hypo and they won't know unless he passes out on the floor and they won't know what to do. His DSN is going in at the end of Sept to a staff meeting to talk to all members of staff about his condition to explain exactly how to deal with hypos and what to look out for. To be honest I am really worried at the moment because they will not know that he is having a hypo. They do know to ring me at any time though if they are worried. I would rather be called 10 times a a day if needs be rather then him being ill. One of the main problems is that they regularly do biscuit sales to raise funds for the school and that is going to be really difficult because some parents make really chocolatey and creamy cakes. Any advice, should I let him have it and compensate later with extra insulin if he is high or do I send him in with something of his own like a cereal bar. Trouble is you don't want to make them feel different because then they will resent their condition because they are not getting the same as everyone else. I think I will have to decide on that at the time.
     
  19. sugarless sue

    sugarless sue · Master

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    Why don't you look for some diabetic friendly recipes for biscuits etc that you could make for him to take.That way he has a contribution and also some biscuits that he can eat without being left out.
     
  20. layla42

    layla42 · Active Member

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    Hi, just thought I'd say hi and join the discussion as I am a parent of a diabetic 3 year old. She is in school nursery every morning. I don't think your nurse should wait till the end of Sept to go into school, she should go in right at the start of term. My DD wasn't allowed back into nursery till all the staff were trained by the diabetic nurse.

    My DD only has 2 injections a day and I hope she goes onto basal/bolus (?) soon as it's hard to control it this way - though I can see it's better for a 3 year old in some ways as you can't rely on them to eat 3 meals a day! But her HBa1C is not brilliant.

    I got a good recipe for choc chip cookies using Splenda on the Splenda website - me and Grace bake them every week nearly. There are loads of recipes on there which might do. If Grace gets given sweets and cake at nursery then I try to make her save it till she is doing exercise and have it as her sugar.

    Sorry for the essay! Layla x
     
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