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Does anyone go full term with t1?

Discussion in 'Pregnancy' started by -Artemis-, Oct 7, 2016.

  1. -Artemis-

    -Artemis- Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    ... I know it's a looooooonngg way off, but I just wondered if we're automatically induced / offered c-section as our delivery options, or if we're ever 'allowed' to go full term...?

    I know the nice guidelines state that if no other complications it's recommended that type 1's are induced / c-section between 37 & 39wks... is that what everyone else has experienced too...?

    If all else is going smoothly I'd kinda really like the baby to come when it wants to... I guess I'd just like to know if that's remotely an option/possibility...?
     
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  2. azure

    azure Type 1 · Expert

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    There have been a few recent threads on this @-Artemis- You could search or simply click back through the last few pages in Pregnancy :)

    I was induced with my last baby (the other two I wasn't as went into labour before). Induction is never compulsory. It's up to you what you choose to do. I think every woman with diabetes would love an uninduced birth, but there is a slightly increased risk of stillbirth so, knowing that, I couldn't make any other decision than to be induced.

    I think there are a few ladies here who went to term/closer to,term. Don't worry about it now. As you get closer to the time, then you can think about what you'd prefer and you can also get advice from your OB :) The NHS recommends induction to reduce the risk of stillbirth. That doesn't mean every woman with diabetes who goes past the recommended induction date will have problems, but I couldn't live with the worry personally. Others may have different views.
     
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  3. jade88

    jade88 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi Artemis as Azure says no one can force you to be induced but there are several reasons why diabetics are induced. As well as the risk of still birth the placenta of a diabetic mature quicker and can begin to fail also diabetics can often have bigger babies (my boy was 9lbs at 38weeks) so if I had gone full term I prob would have had to have a c-section - his size wasn't picked up on growth scan and my control was excellent so even if all is going well I'm personally glad I had induction!
    It's also nice to be in hospital throughout because your monitored closely and there's no rush to get to the hospital in time - also by the end I was just so anxious and just wanted him here safe so I was quite happy to be induced! I was lucky and responded well to induction things progressed quickly and I was able to have a natural birth I know others have had more difficult experiences.
    The most important thing to remember is it's your body and your baby so don't feel pressured to do anything your not comfortable with however the doctors only do what they think is best for you and baby. Good luck with the rest of your pregnancy! xx
     
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  4. kitty55

    kitty55 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    @-Artemis- Yes it is definitely possible to go full term with type 1! I did it and would do it again in a heartbeat, When I was pregnant I did a lot of research on risk and facts and figures for type 1 pregnancies and couldn't really find anything that was convincing me to get induced at 37 weeks just because I am diabetic. I was in the very lucky position that my obs was very very supportive all the way and I told her at about 25 weeks that I intend to go full term and wait "till the baby pops out" and also mentioned that obviously if there were any medical reasons (as in huge baby, pre-eclampsia or anything else) I don't have a problem being induced if baby has to come out but I didn't want it just because I was diabetic.
    As the others say it's your body, your pregnancy and your baby so you can decide how you want to do it. Towards the end of pregnancy I had to go in every day for a CTG which was fine with me and had a couple of scans as well just to check that baby is happy. I was 40+2 when I started contracting and had a scan that afternoon (with contractions which was bit odd) and got sent into labour ward after the scan. I assumed baby would pop out that night or early next day which was unfortunately a very wrong assumption lol. It took 48hrs in total for baby to be born with all sorts of interventions in between (which according to my birth plan I wasn't keen on but baby had other ideas) so they broke my waters and I ended up with an epidural and the drip and to top it all off at the end I had to have an emergency section under GA as baby's blood levels weren't quite right so all my nice plans for a natural birth without interventions went out the window but our baby boy was fine and didn't need any help. Little Benjamin was born at 40+4 weighing 8lbs15 and my obs confirmed afterwards the only issue was that he was sitting in a slightly wrong position which could have happened to anyone and my body did everything right and nobody could have avoided the section. - my placenta looked perfect by the way as well as I specifically asked about it. I kept my pump on throughout and my sugars were perfect all the way.
    Please don't let anyone scare you into induction if you don't want it. Do your research and make up your mind and be flexible (as I had to be lol) and feel free to contact me at any time xxx
     
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  5. Robinredbreast

    Robinredbreast Type 1 · Oracle

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    Hi, I didn't, but it wasn't because of a diabetes related condition.
    Good luck and all the best :)
     
  6. -Artemis-

    -Artemis- Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Thank you so much for all the replies!

    -- some really good info and I guess I need to do some research, plus speak tommy team more... in an 'ideal' world i.e. One without t1! ;) then I'd love to aim for a 'natural' birth - BUT- I am t1 so obviously I don't want to do anything that might harm my baby just because of ideals...

    I'm also scared of induction (all my life my mum has told me how it was the most horrendous experience of her life and she how she thought she would die :/ plus other friends have also relayed how awful it is) - and c-sections have their own set of challenges to deal with too - I'm scared more about healing afterwards with those, than the actual op... anyway - as I said, babies health is definitely top priority so... will investigate!

    Thanks again - it's really helpful to hear others experiences :) xx
     
  7. azure

    azure Type 1 · Expert

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    @artemis I hate induction but it was ok - just took a while for me. I prefer not being induced, but all 3 of my children were natural births :) No sections. You can still have a good birth experience if you're induced. I was able to have an active birth just as I would have done without the diabetes. I never felt fussed or over-medicalised.

    Your team will be best placed to advise you. The statistics you'll see are only numbers - not your individual risk so we all have to make our own decisions and weigh up what risk we're happy with and how we would feel.

    The stillbirth risk is due to both an 'older' placenta and the risk of placental abruption. I spoke to my OB about both things.
     
  8. -Artemis-

    -Artemis- Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Thanks @azure - will definitely discuss more... the induction thing is a fear I have that I keep hearing that by the time labour properly kicks in, mum is already knackered cos it takes so long to actually make it happen... but as you say, I'll speak more to team and others who've actually gone through the experience :)
     
  9. shivles

    shivles · Well-Known Member

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    I believe keeping tight control of your blood sugar will be the biggest factor in your options, this surely will eliminate many risks. Induction carries it's own risks, you just have to choose what risks you're willing to take!

    As above its certainly possible and it's your body so no matter what they may try to pressure you to do ultimately the decision is yours :)
     
  10. azure

    azure Type 1 · Expert

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    Very true - tight control is extremely important in pregnancy. But, even with tight control the risks are statistically higher for any lady with diabetes, and that's what informs the NHS advice which recommends induction between 37 weeks and 38+6 weeks.
     
  11. azure

    azure Type 1 · Expert

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    I don't think there's any way to,predict how long induction will take sadly. The textbook would have flagged me up as someone who'd respond very quickly, but actually I didnt. The game-changer for me was having my waters broken. Things went fast then. So do read up about the birth process and do talk through options with your OB closer to the time - especially options relating to induction. The induction process can vary slightly from hospital to,hospital, so check that out too.

    Again, knowledge is power - read everything you can get your hands on.
     
  12. -Artemis-

    -Artemis- Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    ... just a lil update, I'm looking into getting a Doula

    I was talking to a friend over the weekend and she said her support during her labour was amazing.... I figure as the thing I'm most concerned about re my options, is being induced and it taking so long that I 'lose it' - then at least this way I'll have the reassurance of strong, consistent support
     
  13. Diakat

    Diakat Type 1 · Expert
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    I didn't go to term, but I have a healthy daughter and while I waited for induction to kick in I had a nap! Being induced is not a horror story for all so do talk it through, just in case.
     
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  14. redtree92

    redtree92 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    :) Thank you for sharing, this isn't my post, but pregnancy and type one is something that scares me allot! and this made me feel so reassured xxx
     
  15. -Artemis-

    -Artemis- Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Ah this is so good to hear, thank you! x
     
  16. Postitnote

    Postitnote Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    My Hba1c has been between 32 and 36 throughout pregnancy. My Bean has consistenely been measuring 50th/60th percentile. I am being "allowed" to go to 38 weeks but no further. I have been told that I am welcome to refuse induction until I'm ready but I am just too nervous of the risks to go against my obstetrician's recommendation.

    I've never been the sort of person that wanted a particular birth experience. I just want him out in a way that gives him (and me!!) The best chance of being healthy.
     
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  17. azure

    azure Type 1 · Expert

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    Don't be nervous. The best way to describe it is hard work because you need to keep tight control, but it's not scary at all (no more than the usual anxieties of pregnancy) and you get very well looked after :) I've enjoyed all my pregnancies immensely :)
     
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  18. azure

    azure Type 1 · Expert

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    You put it very well @Postitnote My son was on the 50th percentile and my HbA1C was 28, but I could never have coped with delaying induction and then have something go,wrong. I'd never have forgiven myself. It's not a risk I wanted to take.

    Enjoy the last few days of your pregnancy :)
     
  19. kitty55

    kitty55 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    @redtree92 Glad my story helped. I did enjoy being pregnant alot but to be fair I had it relatively easy compared to other people and if we have a next time at some point it might be completely different.
    It can definitely be done - for some ladies it's more work than others but it is not impossible either way and you will be very well looked after. In my case I was also lucky that my obstetrician supported me 100%. xxx
     
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  20. redtree92

    redtree92 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    yay !! thats so lovely to hear :) thank you ! Well if and when it happens ill be sure to freak out on here :D hehe

    xx
     
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