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Drinking wine with meal reduces risk of developing T2 by 14%

Discussion in 'Type 2 Diabetes' started by Ronancastled, Mar 4, 2022.

  1. Ronancastled

    Ronancastled Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Finally, the research I like to read

    https://www.irishexaminer.com/lifestyle/healthandwellbeing/arid-40821531.html

    They seem a bit hazy on the processes involved

    Well I'll save them the expense of further research.
    Liver prioritizes alcohol & the carbs get a free ride, person less likely to require hyper insulin levels post meal which eventually leads to beta cell burnout & weight gain.
    I can verify the science on this as I've ran many similar experiments.
     
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  2. sgm14

    sgm14 · Well-Known Member

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    The message from this study is that drinking moderate amounts of wine with meals may prevent type 2 diabetes ....

    Strange conclusions, or am I missing something.

    If the researchers were comparing drinking alcohol with meals against consuming alcohol without eating food, and not comparing it against eating meals without alcohol, surely the only conclusion would be that, if you are going to drink, then you should also eat, and they can not conclude that if you are going to eat, then you should also take alcohol.
     
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  3. markpj31

    markpj31 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    All I know is that wine significantly reduces my BSG levels.
     
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  4. boggle

    boggle MODY · Well-Known Member

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    Might be wrong, but I think I remember a recent study that came out that suggests wine doesn't really have any health benefits. Most people that drink wine tend to have higher incomes and all the correlating data that points to improved health are arguably just as closely related to having more money.
     
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  5. Mr_Pot

    Mr_Pot Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I don't understand this. The liver absorbs glucose and stores it as glycogen or fat. If this action was hindered by alcohol surely blood glucose would rise as less would be removed by the liver. Perhaps alcohol prevents the liver from releasing glucose from its stores but why would it release glucose when there is already plenty in the bloodstream?
     
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  6. TriciaWs

    TriciaWs Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    “This data suggest that it’s not the alcohol with meals but other ingredients in wine, perhaps antioxidants, that may be the factor in potentially reducing new-onset type 2 diabetes."
    That is: eating red grapes or similar fruit/veg may help diabetes (counted into the carbs).
     
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  7. Ushthetaff

    Ushthetaff Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I’m sure red wine reduces my blood sugar mind you it might be because I canny see my blood sugar meter when I drink it .
    I’m not making light of a good conversation but I have read of many things that red wine is good for ! Form lowerin blood pressure to reducing cholesterol etc etc and I’ve also read the converse conclusions , if it works I’m definitely in favour , canny beat a good Chateau Neuf Du Pape
     
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  8. lovinglife

    lovinglife Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    When I do drink wine with a meal my blood sugar is always lower, but the next day, I’m presuming once the alcohol is out of my system, my blood sugar is always slightly raised for about 24hrs - I only drink occasionally and experience this every time even with a keto meal. In my experience wine drinking doesn’t lower blood sugar in a good way, only delays the rise and in fact gives a bigger delayed rise than I would experience eating the same meal without alcohol
     
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  9. markpj31

    markpj31 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Yes and no I guess, the argument is that wine does contain a lot of say antioxidants, however, the alcohol kind of does the opposite and nullifies the effect/benefits. I suppose it depends on how much you drink. In France or Italy it is common to have a glass of wine with meals. One area of Italy, the elderly population have the heart health of an infant child and they put it down to fine wine and good food :)
     
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  10. Oldvatr

    Oldvatr Type 2 · Expert

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    The area in Italy is the town of Pioppi which is where Ancel Keys lived and wrote his treatise on Low Fat being the beneficial aspect of their diet. Their diet is of interest to me since it is the one I am now following as it is a low carb version of the Mediterranenan diet, so maybe that is the beneficial aspect?

    Alcohol is recognised as being a glucose lowering treatment - whisky in my case. But is it actually lowering the level, or is it masking the effect by interfering with the bgl meter enzyme action? We know these meters are sensitive to many 'impurities; such as maltose and malitol and also to the heaematocrit value. If the alcohol as a known toxin is increasing imflammation then the body will produce more white blood cells in response, and thus affect the haematocrit ratio. Just musing, but as far as I have seen there has been no sensible study done that uses assay techniques to eliminate these possibilities
     
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  11. smithsj1

    smithsj1 Prediabetes · Member

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    I wouldn't have thought that any nutrition study based on the UK Biobank data would be anything but very weak. Their diet data is collected from online questionnaires. From their website:

    "UK Biobank participants have generously provided a very wide range of information about their health and well-being since recruitment began in 2006. This has been added to in the following ways:......

    Online questionnaires: Data on a range of exposures and health outcomes that are difficult to assess via routine health records, including diet, food preferences, work history, pain, cognitive function, digestive health and mental health.  "

    If you have a questionnaire to fill in with how much of x or y you ate and drank in the last year it's going to be pretty tricky to get anything like an accurate response so pretty unlikely to get good quality data IMO.

    I would say that the data that they collect using MR imaging, genetics, biomarkers and samples may be of more interest but everytime I see a study in the press about diets that say it is derived from the UK Biobank I just don't bother to read it.
     
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  12. Jayne1983

    Jayne1983 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    How much does everyone drink a week?
     
  13. Resurgam

    Resurgam Type 2 (in remission!) · Expert

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    Take a little wine, for the good of thy stomach - which is one bit of advice from the bible few seen to argue against
     
  14. Outlier

    Outlier · Well-Known Member

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    It's very difficult to prove a negative, in this case that non-diabetics wouldn't develop diabetes if they drank a modest amount of red wine. Maybe they wouldn't become diabetic in the future anyway.
     
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  15. markpj31

    markpj31 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I guess that they eat things that are less processed, but I would have thought the diet would be more high fat? Cheese, oily fish, olive oil etc?
     
  16. Oldvatr

    Oldvatr Type 2 · Expert

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    The modern version of Pioppi Diet is indeed LCHF compatible but not keto. it is the diet that Tom Watson used so successfully to get control of his diabetes.

    It is difficult to find information on the diet that is not part of the commercial promotion activity for the diet plan and documentary, with the associated hard sell and promotion splurge. Think Mediterranean (Pioppi village is recognised by WHO as being the origin of the Medoiterranean diet), and add healthy fats. The modern version includes coconut oil which can spark controvrsy, but the advice is = in moderation like a sat fat.

    i am using this diet, and last week I had a consultation with my cardiologist. He was surprised that my condition is stable and not worsening contrary to his expectations, so it would seem to support the claims for heart health in my [n=1] sample. My next review is in a years time, not next month which the cardo was planning to fit a pacemaker. It seems i am too healthy for that to proceed at the moment.
     
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  17. Mr_Pot

    Mr_Pot Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Doctors seem generally to approve of the Mediterranean diet even though they are against a LCHF diet which might be the same thing.
     
  18. Oldvatr

    Oldvatr Type 2 · Expert

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    The NHS in the form of NICE used to recommend it in the days when they included diet advice. Now it is just Eatwell. ho hum.
     
  19. Nick99.9

    Nick99.9 · Member

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    Half a bottle most evenings.
     
  20. Ronancastled

    Ronancastled Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Couple of glasses most nights.
    Beers & a full bottle at the weekend.
     
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