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dsn

Discussion in 'Ask A Question' started by IceLover, Aug 20, 2017.

  1. IceLover

    IceLover Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    HI guys ever since i was young i had always wanted to go into the medical field and still do want to pursue a career in the medical field. Also since i was diagnosed t1d ive seen soo many people in the medical field being things from podiatrist,optometrist and dsn. My question is does anyone actually know the steps into becoming a dsn since i know you would go to uni for nursing but what are the steps after?? I have researched soo much but cant find anything that applies to the UK.
     
  2. therower

    therower Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    @IceLover . Top marks for having a plan and a desire to help others through nursing.
    I'm sorry that I can't offer a great deal of advice, but from what little I am aware of, you would first have to enter general nurse training which takes 3 yrs upon becoming qualified you would then choose the area of nursing you want to specialise in.
    As I say this is only my understanding and may not be entirely correct.
    Good luck for the future.
     
  3. badcat

    badcat · Guest

    I worked in mental heath services alongside psychiatric nurses - the nurses in that area had to qualify with a general nursing degree and focus their placement experiences on mental health settings and take optional mental health modules within their training in order to then persue posts within the mental health field. I would hope its similar for DSN's
     
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    #3 badcat, Aug 20, 2017 at 5:12 PM
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 20, 2017
  4. noblehead

    noblehead Type 1 · Guru
    Retired Moderator

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    As mentioned you'd likely have to train and qualify as a nurse and then train again to become a DSN, why don't you speak with your own DSN and ask them which route they took.
     
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  5. ohitsnicola

    ohitsnicola Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I researched this a couple of weeks ago as I was interested too, I found that you had to do general nursing and then do a course specialising in Diabetes... there were two categories Diabetes specialist nurse and diabetes specialist nurse consultant! x

    Sent from my F3111 using Diabetes.co.uk Forum mobile app
     
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  6. ohitsnicola

    ohitsnicola Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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  7. Robbity

    Robbity Type 2 · Expert

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    I was going to suggest talking to your own DSN - you'd then get the info direct from the horse's mouth so to speak, but it appears that @noblehead's already well and truly beaten me to it!

    But good luck with your quest for info anyway!!
    Robbity
     
  8. IceLover

    IceLover Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Thank you everyone!!!
     
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  9. Lally123

    Lally123 LADA · Well-Known Member

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    Depends if you want to work with adults or kids. Either way you will need a nursing degree in the appropriate speciality. Then you will need to work for at least two years gaining experience in your chosen speciality ie diabetes. Most hospitals will divide their medical wards into specialities ie respiratory, diabetes etc. So get a job working as a band 5 staff nurse on a diabetes ward. Then you can begin to apply for a specialist job, some trusts will offer band 5 roles for specialist nursing or a band 6 training role. Look for something that will offer you role development, career progression and include a masters degree as part of that development. There are a lot of dsn posts about but nurse consultant is more highly prized and you would need years of experience as a dsn first as well as a masters. Some trusts will specify a masters in diabetes before you take on a dsn role. Thats the route I took although my speciality is respiratory and I didn't know much about diabetes till I was diagnosed back in February. Good luck

    Sent from my GT-N8010 using Diabetes.co.uk Forum mobile app
     
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