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Emergency kit for pump users

Discussion in 'Insulin Pump Forum' started by PhileasFogg, Jun 18, 2009.

  1. PhileasFogg

    PhileasFogg · Newbie

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    Hi

    I've just started on a Paradigm Veo and would be grateful for some advice from experienced pump users.

    The user manual suggested I keep an emergency kit with me that contains a large number of items. I know the pump companies have to 'go by the book' and ensure they cover themselves, but I just wondered what do you actually keep with you in case of emergency when you are out? I'd be quite weighed down if I carried everything they suggest.

    Thanks, I look forward to your comments.
     
  2. candi-girl

    candi-girl Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    :( nothing but then i'm a bad girl. i do keep a spare infusion set in my handbag though and an insulin pen, insulin and needles just in case it breaks. :mrgreen:
     
  3. angel19

    angel19 · Member

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    Hi!

    Im getting my pump on the 13th july and although im not the experience you're looking for Ive also been told already to buy a bigger bag!! Ive also been told to keep spare sets at work, in the car, at mums and anywhere else I spend any time so although I dont know yet if this is an exageration it does seem that everyone is singing from the same sheet so far!

    Im always of the opinion to be better safe than sorry thou...

    Jenn p.s. how are you getting on with it?????
     
  4. scottishkate

    scottishkate · Well-Known Member

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    I use a small make-up bag and carry it in my handbag - doesn't take up much room at all. In it I've got a spare set, reservoir pre-filled with insulin, battery, syringe, ketone meter and a few test strips.

    I have left a few sets etc in my desk at work and also at my mum's house but that's because I can be quite forgetful and there's no harm in being prepared!

    Katie :D
     
  5. bonerp

    bonerp · Well-Known Member

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    I keep a couple of spare sets in my desk at work, a couple in my car along with at least 2 packs of dextrose tabs.
    I have meters in my car and desk but don't carry one when I go out in an evening - I know I should!

    If I am out of town I tend to take a spare pen loaded just in case the pump packs up or run out of insulin.

    If I got away I take pens and spare pump too.

    thanks it. If I'm within an hour of home I tend not to bother taking lots of spares. Its easy to get home if theres a problem and its only like taking it off for an hour such as when swimming.

    I used to go well over the top and take out a man bag - but its just not right for men to wear bags sorry!

    Paul
     
  6. PhileasFogg

    PhileasFogg · Newbie

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    Thanks for your replies. I'm hoping to avoid carrying too much so your comments are very helpful.

    Jenn - So far I've been getting on fine with the pump. Seems easy to use. I was concerned about having something attached to me all the time but most of the time I haven't noticed it's there. I'm in the process of sorting out my basal and boluses which is taking a bit of juggling. My main concern, which prompted my question, is that it seems fine while it's working OK but what to do when it goes wrong, especially if I'm away from home. Good luck with yours.
     
  7. bonerp

    bonerp · Well-Known Member

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    mine ran out of juice while i was out on the town one night - forgot to change the cartridge before i went out. So popped home to change it but the plunger part of the cart got stuck in the pump.

    Was comical - 2 drunks trying to fix it whilst on the phone to the pump emergency helpline - what she must have thought on the phone I really don't know!

    Ended up having to get the spare pump out, programme it from scratch between us and re do a new cartridge! Too forever to get it sorted and all I could do i giggle like a school boy (after sheer panic mind!!!)
     
  8. angel19

    angel19 · Member

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    Ha ha oh my god that sounds just exactly like something that would happen to me!!!

    Ive decided to avoid drinking until im 'safe' as my nurse calls it, its just my luck that id be in exactly your shoes :lol: :lol:

    Thats great Phileas that you are finding it ok, Im so glad I found this forum its been great to have access to people who know what its all about
     
  9. Martin Z

    Martin Z · Member

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    I was lucky enough to be given a bag to carry a spare kit around with me from my hospital when I was given the pump, you can buy them from Medtronic for about £10, in it I carry spare insulin, plus all the bits to change the pump for a new cartridge etc, I take that with me wherever I go if I am going out for more than an hour, as I feel under an hour you can get by and give extra insulin when you get home and get it all changed, but if I go for longer I not only take the spare kit but also a spare insulin pen with me in case the pump breaks totally. Hope this helps. :roll:
     
  10. roo.be

    roo.be Type 1 · Active Member

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    I have a spare 1 of everything stashed in the car, at work and my partners car. I have test meters all over the place. If I'm going further afield I usually carry spares in my bag also. As a standard I have test meter and glucose gel in my bag. If I'm flying I have a set in hand luggage and another in the hold bag.

    I'm curious as to how much stuff you're suggested to have as even when it's in my bag in a separate carry case my spares are not so bulky. My spares include a cannula and infusion set, a cartridge and insulin.

    It's also worth a mention that I've been very fortunate having travelled extensively around the world with my diabetes that I've found pharmacists and health care facilities across the world to be incredibly helpful in emergency situations. Even here in the UK I've had cause to roll up to a random diabetic clinics and be provided with spare parts! usually accompanied with a ticking off for not being prepared! Hey, in a perfect world....
     
  11. Alzibiff

    Alzibiff Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Like many, I don't carry anything apart from my test meter when out and about on the basis that I am rarely more than an hour or so from home and although it would often be inconvenient, could always get "back to base" before anything dramatic happened.

    Saying that, the other week, I made a trip to London on the train - out for the day, 200 miles from home doing some work. Checked that there was enough power in the pump battery then packed a vial of insulin, reservoir and an infusion set along with a supply of Jelly Babies (5g of fast acting carbs each one and my hypo treatment of choice since my DAFNE course) and my test meter. As it happened, no worries, quite an uneventful day as far as diabetes was concerned. However - when I got home, it dawned on me that I had not taken the plastic spring loaded doo-dah which is used to fire in the cannula. Ooooooo! No doubt I would have managed without it if I needed to change my infusion set - maybe - or at least had an attempt but I think that carrying one of those would be something to think about.

    Alan
     
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