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explaining what it's really like to live with Type 1

Discussion in 'Type 1 Diabetes' started by himtoo, Jun 29, 2016.

  1. Australia 1

    Australia 1 · Guest

    The List of things you have are not what I thought which was Cancer. Avascular Necrosis, Total Memory loss, yep. How many years did I have Diabetes, just how many years did I have Type 2 and now Type 1. Face it Sam, @Davidd1953 was my Dad,s Name. Yes I see it now. Much hard work for Hb1Ac of now 6.6%. Endocrinologist said, Sam that’s not bad. I want you to be in the 5.0 mmol area. If you fight this like you did your Lymphoma and Melanoma I promise you 80+ Years. It is a thin tightrope walk Sam. Stock up on everything as you are gonna win this.
    Hey, Thank you @nessals946. You like Andrew and two women Linda and Sharon have lit me off and I am gonna Fly.
    No Fear From Australia.
     
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  2. Australia 1

    Australia 1 · Guest

    @Grant_Vicat. Brother I went through a Hypo while writing on here. I thought that the disheveled mindset would be a class lesson in this subject. WRONG. As I look back on the. Experience people just had every answer in the book long after it was over with. This is whey too much for me. People cared. People were idiots and I will just read from now on. There knowledge is good here but I have had it with the experts. I am not going to accept anything unless it is from you. Thanks mate.
     
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  3. nessals946

    nessals946 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    ???
     
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  4. Australia 1

    Australia 1 · Guest

    Dear Grant_Vicat, Since my Famous on board Hypo Experience I remember that very profound that made you stand out from your previous writing. These Hypos are indeed very very strange. This May be a very simple question to you but you have really stirred me thinking up about Hypos since the last Article of inspiration that earned Kudos from me. I went for a 7 Kilometre walk to my bank today and I did it in low gear. Ever since my Chemotherapy In fall of of, 2014 in the Southern Hemisphere around June of that year this alleged Chemobrain is as real as a Hypo but not in the same terms. Amnesia and “where are the car Keys” is very much different than the unreality is reality syndrome. Of the 30 some odd Neurotransmitters in the Human Brain, I think as I read some of your work that Sugar has a profound effect of nothing even close to Chemobrain. Now the brain shutting down as our result of starvation as you said it well, has really got me thinking. This puts me in the thinking of Hypoxia as those symptoms replicate those of what I just experienced 2 days ago and the exact thinking that you are conveying right now.
    @Grant_Vicat. I am emdebted to you not to back off but to understand the concept of exactly what a concept of a Hypo really and truly is.
    Brother Sam.
     
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  5. Grant_Vicat

    Grant_Vicat Don't have diabetes · Well-Known Member

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    Many thanks Sam, it's very kind of you to put your thoughts on the thread. All the very best, Grant
     
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  6. Grant_Vicat

    Grant_Vicat Don't have diabetes · Well-Known Member

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    Hi @Bluemarine Josephine I haven't written a 150 page thesis, but I have written 118 pages (if you include 14 pages of Index) of living with Type1 from the age of 11 months till 4 days before my 55th birthday - all wrapped up in the book in the picture! Hope you succeed!
     
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  7. Grant_Vicat

    Grant_Vicat Don't have diabetes · Well-Known Member

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    So did I, in the picture! What's yours called?
     
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  8. Grant_Vicat

    Grant_Vicat Don't have diabetes · Well-Known Member

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    Way back in this thread someone mentioned using the side of the thumb was least painful. I also found the side of my little finger end. Hope all goes as well as possible.
     
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  9. Grant_Vicat

    Grant_Vicat Don't have diabetes · Well-Known Member

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    Hi @evj95 Interesting comments on high readings. Here are some excerpts from the book I'm holding:
    I would always know when I was in ketosis, because my breathing became very laboured, all my muscles felt as though I had run ten miles and performed fifty press-ups, I had an overwhelming feeling of nausea, would drink vast amounts of water without slaking my thirst, would shun social contact, and my family would notice the all too familiar reek of nail polish remover or pear drops. In later years I realised that it would cloud my vision. Until 2010 I was the only member of the family not to need glasses or lenses, but when I was standing on Shoreham Station platform, aged 13, I was unable to read the nameplate on the opposite platform. Panic set in. Was I already going blind? Or was I suffering from cataracts? My mother took me to an optician that weekend, who could find little worth discussion. However they charged my mother for some placebo gold rimmed glasses. I later realised that it was blood sugar affecting my eyes. The glasses were to serve as props in School plays.
    One of the strangest manifestations of Hyperglycaemia is nonsense talk. Very early in my childhood, I would sit on my parents’ bed and utter “phrases” such as “Ee sassa de diddlydee”, and my father, with his analytical mind, would say “What’s ee sassa?” or “What do you mean diddlydee?” I would collapse into uncontrollable giggling and utter yet more nonsense, all the while being ecstatic until the level rose too high. Even now I catch myself inventing bizarre expressions such as “homuntuline moomeat”. I suppose this is cheaper than Class 1 drugs. It took a while before my father observed that there was a relationship between blood chemistry and mental balance (dare I say normality?) My assessment has been slightly challenged by an utterance I made while asleep, with very low blood sugar. In 2004 I clearly uttered the word “Dursit”, with the stress on the first syllable. Imagine my dismay on discovering that the word already existed in a Thai restaurant in Thistle Street, Edinburgh and in place names in Albania. I shall have to consider copyrights.
    High blood sugar and disturbed digestion have already been referred to above, as has uncontrollable temper. Even with moderately high levels such as 10.5mmol/L, I lose my natural patience and become irritated by what are normally trifles. One of my employers commented that diabetics ought not to be crossed after lunchtime! Non-diabetic children are known to behave more excitedly after a “sugar fix”, as anybody with children in their charge will tell you. It is only in the last thirty-nine years that the carbohydrate content has been stated on food and drink. Yet the public don’t usually know how much sugar they are ingesting in a standard can of fizz. There is the equivalent of eight teaspoons of sugar or two thirds of my lunch starch allowance. Certain chocolate bars have thirteen spoons of sugar...To me and similar people, doughnuts, treacle tart and apple crumble are “Death on a plate!” I have also noticed that my nose runs when I am high. Is this because the brain is using this system to get rid of excess sugar, as it does colds?
    Probably the most damaging effect of hyperglycaemia is lethargy. Often an overwhelming tiredness can put the patient to sleep extraordinarily quickly, and after maybe three hours sleep there is no sign of benefit. Stress, especially before playing the organ in a big service or concert can have a far reaching effect: Illness, or more irritatingly, when my immune system is fighting a prevalent bug, has a similar outcome. Many such horrors sweep through my work at regular intervals. I rarely show symptoms, but my readings and Insulin regime are increased for maybe days on end.
    Bear in mind that this was written in 2009!
     
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  10. Australia 1

    Australia 1 · Guest

    Australia 1 and Real Life Type 1 Living with @Grant_ Vicat. Dear Forum. I am into my 5th month of Type 1 Diabetes. I wrote a thread or tried to write through a Hypoglycemia event. Much like me new friend Grant, if that is indeed his name I become very very interested the same subject matter that happens in the starvartion of
    the Brain of Glucose nourishment.
    So when Type 2 came into my life 3.5 years ago it was told to me by my ocologist to brings and aging factor. So I came to this forum incognito. I read and read and read at this forum and the American one with an Australian section all to itself. Getting back to Type 1 Hypos I must say that Grant_Vicat has the mind of an Aerospace engineer as his research is easy to feed on. It was in the last six months that life to me was not going to be good at all. Different doctors that cost real money were making me very angry. Did my Endocrinologist really Understand hypoglycemia or was it a joke. Not I am not implying that doctors are fakes and phonies and anytime Grant wrote to anybody about anything involving glucose indulgence I sat up and took notice of what He wrote. And now I understand and I ruin things for Newbies because I have to say what is real. My life is now terrible. I struggle with Mathematics and Carb counting and insulin measurements to the Tee. But millions in the world today are born Type 1 Diabetic,s. I go to the Scriptures to try to make sense out of the book of Job to make sense of suffering. Hard Questions? Yes indeed. Next week I am setting down with a new team that understands oncology and there Specialty is Diabectic conditions of all kinds. I have used that tight rope analogy many times about life, but oh does it so apply to a diabetic of any type. The Straight and narrow way. Too much of this chemical starts this. Too much of that starts something else. I guess Grant_Vicat that we should be very graceful for all that we have and encourage one another. What do ya think mate!!
    Sam Danner.
     
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  11. catapillar

    catapillar Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    So, are you type 1 or type 2?
     
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  12. Grant_Vicat

    Grant_Vicat Don't have diabetes · Well-Known Member

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    I've always felt that! Greetings Downunda
     
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  13. catapillar

    catapillar Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Thanks, I've gotta be honest though, that quote doesn't really make things much clearer. As we know, type 2 doesn't turn into type 1. It sound to me, from what little sense I can make of @Australia 1 's postings that he has type 2 diabetes treated with insulin and, wrongly, thinks the insulin treatment makes it type 1. But as I say, I do find a lot of his postings a bit difficult to interpret, which is why I asked him to clarify.
     
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  14. Mike D

    Mike D Type 2 · Expert

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    Agree it's not easy sorting the chaff from the hay, but T2 on insulin seems to fit. Not that I'm anxiously waiting for a reply anytime soon
     
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  15. prancer53

    prancer53 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Thank you....!!!!
     
  16. prancer53

    prancer53 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    A bit like my gp who seems to think that my type 1 has turned into type 2 now that I am in my 65th year.....!!! She tells me I have hypos if I eat anything sweet because it promotes the production of more insulin from my pancreas. Never quite know what to say to that---I can hardly correct her, can I? Not as young and brash as I once was.......!!!!!!
     
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  17. prancer53

    prancer53 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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  18. prancer53

    prancer53 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Also 57 years......nice to meet you (virtually).....!!!!!
     
  19. prancer53

    prancer53 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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  20. prancer53

    prancer53 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Also 57 years....amazing to have found 2 people on here who have had type 1 as long as I have....Congratulations!! Also went to Reading Festival in the early seventies---just jabbed sitting on grass under a blanket --- back in the day....
     
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