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Farmed salmon vs wild salmon?

Discussion in 'Low-carb Diet Forum' started by Roggg, Mar 1, 2020.

  1. Roggg

    Roggg Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Wondering if anybody around here knows the answer here. I know farmed salmon is not nearly as good for you as wild because farmed salmon is fed a **** diet high in corn meal. But just how much less good is farmed vs wild? Is it worth having as a healthy alternative to meats? I have read opinions ranging from "prefer wild if you can get it" all the way to "if you cant get wild you might as well be eating beef. Anyone got the scoop?
     
  2. Brunneria

    Brunneria Other · Moderator
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    I eat beef a great deal, and consider it to be a much more nutritious choice than chicken - or farmed salmon - but that is probably a whole different thread ;)

    regarding the wild v farmed salmon debate, there is plenty of evidence that farmed is much less nutritious than wild. Also much less expensive.
    https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/wild-vs-farmed-salmon#nutrition

    we all need to balance funds against nutrition.

    I've been eating more herring this last year. Kippers and rollmops. Don’t think herring can be farmed, but happy to be corrected. Variety is, for me, a very important thing, in order to keep my way of eating sustainable. So tuna, mackerel, herring AND salmon are all things I enjoy when choosing oily fish.

    ed. to add, if you want to kick nutrition from salmon (or any fish) into the stratosphere, then eat the roe. I splashed out on a tiny jar of salmon roe a while back, had i have cods roe in the freezer. Delicious.
     
    #2 Brunneria, Mar 1, 2020 at 9:13 PM
    Last edited: Mar 1, 2020
  3. Mike d

    Mike d Type 2 · Expert

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    When I see a brown bear wandering to the packaged fish section of my supermarket, I'll let you know :)
     
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  4. Tipetoo

    Tipetoo Type 2 · Expert

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    @Mike D Reminds me of a John West advert with a bear in it...

     
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  5. Mbaker

    Mbaker Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    It's a shame that the premise of the question has a tone that beef is unhealthy. Beef is one of the core ingredients, the majority of in remission Type 2's on this site eat and much wider communities, Meatrx.com provides daily examples.

    Fish has been adulterated, but will still be better in my view, than foods with 5 or more fake put together ingredients and certainly more healthy than the foods popularised in January by supermarkets, for profit in disguise of climate change.

    Most people will need to buy to their budget, which can still provide, short and medium term health. As for long term health no diet has ever been tested, but we do know meat has been eaten for millennia and that the current longest living population are in Hong Kong, and they eat the most meat.
     
  6. Roggg

    Roggg Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I don't mean to presume that beef is unhealthy...more that the specific aspects of salmon that make it particularly healthy are not prominent in beef. That is the omega fat profile. Of course that raises the question of grass-fed beef vs corn fed beef, so if you want to compare products fairly, there's 2 beefs and 2 salmons.

    I'm from eastern canada, and for me "Atlantic salmon" is what I eat, and sadly there is no wild fishery on this side of the ocean anymore. So it's farmed or nothing. Pacific salmon is much less available here.
     
  7. DCUKMod

    DCUKMod I reversed my Type 2 · Master
    Staff Member Administrator

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    Roggg, I think we'd all like to eat the "perfect" diet, to achieve "perfect" blood sugar numbers to live a "perfect" life.

    I use the "" on the perfects there, because perfection doesn't exist in anything sustainable for weeks, months, years and decades. All manner of things get in the way.

    Where I was soon after diagnosis, and still am on all this is that for me to sustain a decent (for my physical and meant health, and for those around me, diet, I have to have variety and I have to enjoy it. I have to be able to comfortably eat out as well as eat at home, so what that means is sometimes I have to compromise.

    I'm in SE Asia at the moment, and for the last 2 months haven't cooked at all, and the only food prep has been for breakfast. Main meals have all been eaten out.

    The principals,of the food here involve sweet, sour, salty, spicy and bitter. On that basis, almost anything I eat will have at least a bit of palm sugar in it. Of course, I'd prefer all those fabulous flavours without the sugar, but all it means is I manage the rest of my days eating to assume the sugar.

    Has it impacted my A1c? No, or if anything by a shaving. My last result, about a week ago was 4.8% (28, if I recall).

    So, I think the message is do your best, but enjoy it. There's no point seeking out a chap who will stand in an icy river all day to catch your wild salmon if it bankrupts you, so a compromise along the way is likely more sustainable.

    We each place our bets in lid, hoping for a decent return for a modest risk. Sometimes it works out well, and sometimes less so.
     
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