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Fasting reading low

Discussion in 'Type 2 Diabetes' started by Geordie_P, Nov 4, 2016.

  1. Geordie_P

    Geordie_P Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I got my first glucose tester this week: it said I was 3.3 this morning.
     
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  2. Geordie_P

    Geordie_P Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    No, actually I'm very new to diabetes, so I'd appreciate your advice. I felt totally normal this morning, so I didn't treat it as a hypo, and I just went to work as usual. My readings seem to run a bit low in general, and I don't vary much: I'm 3.5 or thereabouts fasting, then 4.9 (or under) two hours after my main evening meal. I haven't been testing myself long, but I eat the same every day, so I think these numbers should be fairly steady.
     
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  3. asparagusp

    asparagusp · Guest

    I am all for steady readings but your sugars are far too low. You can have a hypo and be unaware you are having one. I suggest you raise this issue as a thread. There are a lot more knowledgeable people than me who will give you sound advice.\

    Normal fasting is 4-7 and two hours post breakfast reading less than 8.5.
     
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  4. Geordie_P

    Geordie_P Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    OK, thanks for the heads-up, asparagus.
    I'll look into it and see what needs doing.
     
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  5. ickihun

    ickihun Type 2 · Master

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    Most medical bods will say use glucose and retest. Especially using insulin or other meds which lower blood glucose.
    During the day I treat with protein as it raises MY bgs. Everyone finds what works for them. If I use glucose I get very high bgs for a while. Through the night I use glucose as I need instant solution.
    To keep on topic. My fbg was 7.2 this morning before breakfast.
     
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  6. asparagusp

    asparagusp · Guest

    Agreed but the poster is also having low blood sugar throughout the day .....
     
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  7. debrasue

    debrasue · Guest

    Not necessarily a hypo - everyone's different and depends on meds etc
     
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  8. Lamont D

    Lamont D Reactive hypoglycemia · Master

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    Having a fasting reading of around 3.5 is normal. You have to take into account the accuracy of the monitor.
    One fasting reading isn't a true picture.
    Being between 3.5 (ish) and 6.0 is acceptable to most specialist and guidelines.
    If he continually gets readings of low figures, then he should consult his GP and if he has a food diary with the figures. The doctor should then take the necessary steps to get a clear diagnosis.
    My fasting readings (morning) run between 3.8 and 4.8 with the odd 5+ reading.
    This is normal.
    But I am weird!
     
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  9. AndBreathe

    AndBreathe I reversed my Type 2 · Master
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    @Geordie_P - Your profile doesn't give us any clues to what, if any, medication you might be taking to help with your diabetes. Could you let us know?

    Whilst your fasting number of 3.3 is low, it may, or may not be a hypo requiring action.

    Some of us run lower than others, and I am such a person whose numbers run low. My own fasting levels, tested over three years, run between 3.5 - 4.5. I don't think (aside from immediately after diagnosis) I have ever actually seen anything over 4.5 (which would usually be if I am very stressed, or a bit under the weather, or haven't slept at all), but I have seen numbers lower than 3.5. I won't post my lowest as that's unimportant in the context of this thread.

    That said, I don't take any medication and look after myself pretty well. Where concerns arise is usually where those taking heftier drugs to lower their blood scores experience very low numbers, as that can be a concern, and need to be treated to bring the numbers up. You may just be like me. At this stage nobody can really know.

    As I say, these days, I have ranges I run in, but if I see a tested number outside that range, I usually just wash my hands and do another test, to make sure the test reading is about right. Readings can be influenced if our hands are contaminated with anything, or wet, or indeed, very cold. Our meters, whilst accurate enough, do operate to within a +/-15% margin of error. That is an international legal standard.

    Testing is important, so keep at it, and keep contributing to the forum. People are keen to help where they can.

    Edited, just to say, what action you take when you have a low number largely depends upon what drugs you take, and how you feel. If yo are not on meds and you feel fine, then just carry on, or maybe just have a cup of tea with some milk. If you feel rough, then you may want to eat something to bring your bloods up a little more.

    In this instance, as it was breakfast time (and again assuming you are not on strong meds), in your shoes, I'd just crack on and have breakfast.

    If you are taking meds and feel concerned about it, the please do discuss it with your doctor who may want to adjust your meds, or do some further tests.
     
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    #9 AndBreathe, Nov 5, 2016 at 8:36 AM
    Last edited: Nov 5, 2016
  10. bulkbiker

    bulkbiker Type 2 · Oracle

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    Agree 100% with @AndBreathe
    As far as I know you're not on any meds for your Type 2 so there's nothing that is artificially lowering your blood sugars.
    You are obviously a bit concerned about it as you have posted a couple of times about it but I think just keep monitoring and see what happens. So long as you feel ok then don't worry. I saw a video recently with Dr Stephen Phinney one of the guru's of low carb who said that in the 70's on a very low carb diet trial they injected the participants with insulin and got their blood sugar down to 1.5 mmol with no ill effects because the trial participants were in ketosis (i.e. eating very few carbs and burning fat) as I think you now are.
     
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  11. bulkbiker

    bulkbiker Type 2 · Oracle

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    Finally found it!



    worth a watch when you have a spare 40 minutes or so.
     
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    #11 bulkbiker, Nov 5, 2016 at 9:14 AM
    Last edited: Nov 5, 2016
  12. ickihun

    ickihun Type 2 · Master

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    I agree with @AndBreathe and @bulkbiker on this @Geordie_P . They are living the same experience as type 2s. I take lowering agents so I have to be careful of faster reductions leading to coma, from insulin especially.
     
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