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Fatty Liver

Discussion in 'Ask A Question' started by lucylocket61, Feb 14, 2020.

  1. MollieB

    MollieB · Well-Known Member

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    Do they feel that it could be Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) or simply fatty liver? NASH is more serious. The one thing that you may be able to do for it is control your cholesterol, particularly your triglycerides. I'm so sorry you got another thing added to your plate. Can you ask to see a specialist, (if you have't already)?
     
  2. Winnie53

    Winnie53 Type 2 · BANNED

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    luckylocket61, I have no answers, but have a fascination with the topic of fatty liver. Here's one of the most interesting interviews I've come across on fatty liver. And I think, its been a year since I listened to it over and over again, I don't think she's a fan of the keto diet, so perhaps you'll glean some ideas... :)



    Any online lectures by Robert Lustig, MD may be helpful. He discusses liver health in all his lectures. He's a huge fan of eating real, whole, fiber rich foods. Not a fan of eating fiber as a supplement. Additionally, he's neutral on the keto diet. It's hard to pick a favorite lecture, but this one is good one, presented at the Public Health Collaborative conference in 2019...



    [Big hug]
     
    #22 Winnie53, Feb 15, 2020 at 3:44 AM
    Last edited: Feb 15, 2020
  3. DCUKMod

    DCUKMod I reversed my Type 2 · Master
    Staff Member Administrator

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    Oh dear. @lucylocket61 , life just keeps giving for you at the moment.

    I agree about looking into those engines, but also when was your thyroid last checked, along with a vitamin panel?

    I know it's my hobbyhorse, but out thyroid is absolutely central to our whole metabolic process, yet is usually examined extremely superficially by the NHS. TSH, as a metric is almost as useful as urinalysis strips for blood glucose, yet seems to be the big thing for the NHS.

    I'll get off my box now.
     
  4. Indy51

    Indy51 Type 2 · Expert

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  5. Indy51

    Indy51 Type 2 · Expert

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    You're right, @Caeseji - there are also genetic variations that affect endogenous synthesis of choline. Below is something from one of my genetic reports (I have a variation for reduced production):

    "Phosphatidylethanolamine -N- methyltransferase (PEMT) catalyzes the synthesis of phosphatidylcholine and, thus, choline in the liver. Having one or more T nucleotides at rs7946 is associated with having lower phosphatidylcholine production in the liver with a second T increasing the effect.
    Phosphatidylcholine is a key component in all cell membranes and plays a very important role in the structure of the cell, which affects all biological functions. It is also a precursor for the neurotransmitter acetylcholine, which has been shown to play a role in the promotion of REM sleep. Damage to the cholinergic system in the brain has been shown to be plausibly associated with the memory deficits associated with Alzheimer's disease and possibly other neurodegenerative diseases, and for this reason has also been a therapeutic target through the action of acetylcholinesterase inhibition, which prevent the enzymatic breakdown of acetylcholine.
    In addition to the important role phosphatidylcholine plays in cell membranes (particularly in neurons), it also is important in the liver. Phosphatidylcholine is required for the liver to secrete triglycerides into very low density lipoproteins (VLDL cholesterol). Decreased phosphatidylcholine can lead to decreased fat removal from the liver and, for that reason, may be associated with fatty liver disease.
    Lifestyle interactions:
    Dietary choline intake. Choline is found in foods such as eggs, meat, fish and cruciferous vegetables. Strict vegetarians may need to pay special attention to meeting their choline needs. The Food and Nutrition Board (FNB) of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) has established the Adequate Intake (AI) for choline for men (550 mg) and for women (425 mg) during pregnancy (450 mg) and lactation (550 mg).
    Phosphatidylcholine is also available in supplement form.


    It might be worthwhile for you to do some research on supplementation as it may help clear the liver fat if you have a dietary deficiency or genetic risk like I do, @lucylocket61
     
    • Useful Useful x 1
  6. HSSS

    HSSS Type 2 · Expert

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    Fat fingers entirely. It was meant to be a hug. Sorry. Changed now. I did say hug in my post though.
    I’m also sorry that you’ve been made to feel that you can’t state your experiences and difficulties with keto. Not the spirit of the forum nor very helpful to anyone.
     
  7. Jim Lahey

    Jim Lahey I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Not sure I can wholly agree with that. There's plenty of cases of people burning off a fatty liver before losing much weight at all. Certainly there are a few TOFI who would disagree.
     
    • Agree Agree x 3
    • Winner Winner x 1
  8. Indy51

    Indy51 Type 2 · Expert

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    ITA. I think it's pretty much agreed nowadays that fatty liver should be considered part of metabolic syndrome - and it's possible for skinny TOFIs to have it; just as there are insulin sensitive obese people who won't have it.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  9. Antje77

    Antje77 LADA · Moderator
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    Hi Lucy, how are you today? Hope a night of sleep has helped a little.
    Just in case it's needed, have another hug, I was thinking of you tonight. If not needed enjoy it anyway, nothing wrong with a happy-day hug either :)

    [​IMG]
     
    • Friendly Friendly x 1
  10. lucylocket61

    lucylocket61 Type 2 · Expert

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    Thank you. I do feel a bit better today. All my other organs, including my kidneys and gall bladder are healthy. So I am trying to be positive.

    And the shape on my liver turned out to be a benign cyst, which is also good.

    I think I get overwhelmed sometimes with juggling different conditions. And frustrated that my bowel condition rules out some of the very low carb or keto options

    Onwards and upwards!
     
    • Optimistic Optimistic x 2
    • Hug Hug x 2
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