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Feel discriminated [emoji35][emoji25]

Discussion in 'Diabetes Discussions' started by aileenmoore00, Jun 23, 2017.

  1. aileenmoore00

    aileenmoore00 Type 1 · Member

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    Okay so I'm 17 and doing an apprenticeship. I just had a hypo at work and ended up feeling quite ill and sleepy as everyone knows. I had sugar and my levels were back to normal (7.8) but work have just sent me home because I had a hypo and there was no management to "watch out for me" even though I said I was fine and able to work I apparently have no choice because I'm not 18.

    I feel so upset that I had no say in whether I thought I was well enough to work because of my age. And just because people are scared when they see how a diabetic acts when thy are hypo.

    Do I have no rights?? Anyone else experienced this before??
     
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  2. Robinredbreast

    Robinredbreast Type 1 · Oracle

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    Hi sorry to hear what happened to you in your aprenticeship, I hope you are recovering and you are feeling better now.
    It could be, in some work places, you are still considered as a child under 18 ? As your health and safety would come first. When you return, have a talk about it with your management and possibly educate them on hypo's. Take care
     
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  3. therower

    therower Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi @aileenmoore00 . Hope you're feeling better now.
    Tricky situation and I'm in no way knowledgeable about how the law works regarding your age and work and who is responsible for your welfare whilst at work.
    In a way I think your employer did the best thing and probably had your best interests at heart. Seeing someone hypo can be more scary for the observer than it is for the diabetic. Perhaps a bit of education about diabetes and hypos may give your work friends more confidence to make decisions and help in a way that suits both parties better.
    Fully understand your annoyance at being over ruled, but it's history now and all you can hope to do is take steps to avoid a similar situation in the future.
    If I was an employer and had a 17 yr old apprentice who had had a hypo at work I would want them to take the rest of the day off and go home. Thing is I'm a diabetic hence I have more information about these things than most.
    Good luck.
    What's the apprenticeship?
     
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  4. fletchweb

    fletchweb Prefer not to say · Well-Known Member

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    That's terrible. I was very concerned with how people would treat me once they found out I had diabetes so for about my first 30 years of living with it, I kept it a secret from work, school, acquaintances and team mates. I didn't really come out of the diabetes closet until I hit my 40th year of living with it - and even then some co-workers placed it upon themselves to try and make a big deal of my situation. I'm 55 now so I guess I'm at the age where I just don't care anymore.

    But I can certainly relate to what you're dealing with and I had to deal with similar situations as more people learned of my condition. This is where I think Educators and Health Professionals have failed - the number of times it was perceived I did not have long to live or I was incapable of doing normal things all because of someone's ignorance.

    I don't think we have progressed that far in regard to public opinion. And building relationships always seemed EXTRA STRESSFUL. There were many dates that went BAD once it was discovered I had diabetes. Fortunately I found an intelligent spouse who did not see my condition as a big deal (might be one of the reasons we have stayed together for 33 years LOL).

    All the best and I hope the social aspects of having diabetes get better for you.
     
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  5. Resurgam

    Resurgam Type 2 (in remission!) · Expert

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    It isn't discrimination on a personal level - as an apprentice your employer has a duty of care. You were obviously not well for a while, so sending you home for the rest of the day is the easiest way for them to react to it.
     
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  6. Grumpy ole thing

    Grumpy ole thing Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi @aileenmoore00, I hope you are feeling better. You do have rights, you have rights to protection from unscrupulous employers as legally you are not yet an adult even though you are working, however I do see your point, its really hard being treated differently.
    https://www.nspcc.org.uk/preventing...efinition-child-rights-law/legal-definitions/

    I hope you have a fab weekend, its unlikely anyone will remember by Monday anyway ;) x
     
  7. Prem51

    Prem51 Type 2 · Expert

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    Hi @aileenmoore00 I'm sorry to hear you felt discriminated against because of your condition and age. Employers do have a duty of care though. I don't know what your workplace is like but it could be that you might be in danger if you have a hypo there.
    When I was working anyone who felt faint or unwell could go to a medical room and be seen by a first aider who could assess if that person just needed to rest for a while, be sent to hospital, or go home.
    If they were sent home a first aider with a car could be asked drive them home in case they fainted or collapsed. It's better to be safe than sorry.
     
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  8. DavidGrahamJones

    DavidGrahamJones Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Sorry to hear that you've had this experience. It might not have seemed the case at the time but maybe caution on your employer's part was the most sensible thing.

    We don't know the full story but hopefully they knew what was happening and what to do which, from some of the stories I hear is a real bonus.

    There some useful info at https://www.diabetes.org.uk/Guide-to-diabetes/Life-with-diabetes/Employment/.
    I'm type II and had several hypos while taking Gliclazide, usually brought on by skipping lunch and doing strenuous work in the garden. So I've been lucky because I was at home. It's possible that we forget how scary hypos can be for people around us. I remember a workmate having a hypo and the first aider was the only one panicking, probably because most people didn't have a clue.

    The URL is a good read, I think your employer was probably looking after you as much as themselves. I'm sure they'd appreciate a chat along the lines of what's suggested in the URL.

    Don't let it get you down, there's plenty of challenges with this disease. Goof Luck.
     
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  9. James321

    James321 · Member

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    Hi there, I'm a dad of a 18 year old daughter who was recently diagnosed around two years ago, she also has had terrible mood swings and problems with her insulin levels and just day to day highs and lows. Her college teachers to my amasment were not best placed or seemed able to help her or even empathise to the extent she's left and wants to go to work not even taking her final exams. I feel incredibly sad for her.
    All of that said, I think people are just nervous or scared of not being able to help or simply not knowing what to do if required.
    Please don't let this get you down, enjoy the rest of your day off, put the telly on, or just chill. This won't be for ever, as I keep telling my daughter, it's just a chapter in your life where you have to be strong for a while.
    Talk with your friends, family, or a diabetes support group but please don't worry about it.
    Your not alone.
     
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