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Feeling Over Whelmed

Discussion in 'Newly Diagnosed' started by GlitterSparkles, Jul 12, 2018.

  1. GlitterSparkles

    GlitterSparkles Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    hi i feel a bit over whelmed with all of this and i dont want anyone to know about it mum said i should tell some people but i dont want to and it kinda makes be upset :(:(:(
     
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  2. xfieldok

    xfieldok Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    If you don't want to tell anyone, then don't. It sounds like you need to come to terms with things first. You will know when you are ready to talk to other people.
    Hugs
     
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  3. Gella01

    Gella01 Type 2 · Newbie

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    I still feel the same after a few years no matter the advisory sessions of what to eat and the effects it has on your body and the implications that go with it in especially when you have lead a healthy and fit lifestyle but catagorised in a fold of people who have not lead healthy lifestyles.
    I think someone to discuss your emotional aspects would be good maybe if I or we set something up ourselves would be good
     
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  4. helensaramay

    helensaramay Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    It is totally understandable you are overwhelmed, upset and don't want to tell anyone.
    Diabetes is a BIG thing.

    I think it is great that you are asking lots of questions. On the other hand, there is a lot to take in and you have the rest of your life to learn.
    One of the phrases that you often see on this forum is "it's a marathon not a sprint". I think this is very true - if you sprint the first mile of a marathon, you have no energy left for the remaining 25 miles but you still have to do it (ok, you could give up on a marathon but few people want to).

    In your shoes, I would take a step back and focus on learning how to manage my BG with the tools I have today.
    You don't have a pump, so don't worry about them.
    The risk of complications comes with prolonged high BG so don't worry about the complications for now and focus on trying to keep your BG stable.
    That doesn't mean you should stop asking questions ... please continue to ask - we have all been where you are now (although for some it was so long ago, we may struggle to remember :) )

    As for telling people, that's a difficult one. I remember I didn't want people to think differently of me because I have diabetes or to treat me with kid gloves or to worry on my behalf or ... It's my condition and I will manage it. And I am very stubbornly independent.
    However, it is not a bad idea to tell one person you are out with. You don't have to give then the full nine yards but if you have a good friend with you who you can trust, just tell them you have diabetes, you are doing ok but tell them which pocket you have your lucozade/jelly babies/.. in just in case you start feeling "weird".
    A good friend will provide a shoulder to lean on when they see you need it but will not force it under your chin all the time.
    As they say, "it is good to talk" and it may help with your feeling of being overwhelmed.

    For most of us, things get easier over time.
    I used to think having diabetes was like being given a child that I had to look after all the time. It was already a toddler with a mind of its own and I was entirely responsible for it. I couldn't give it back but I couldn't always control it.
    If truth be told, diabetes is sometimes still that toddler but over the years, we have learnt what the boundaries are and that toddler is better behaved (most of the time).
     
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  5. Freema

    Freema Type 2 · Expert

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    but sharing ones emotions and worries many times make them easier to cope with, you could use people in the same situations in here as some virtual friends that really understand your situation, I am type 2 , but I must admit being here have made me understand how much of a burden type 1 diabetes can be and is to many, most type 2´s can manage with less eternal worries compared to type 1 diabetic... it is good to express your feelings, so send you a hug and give you credit for at least sharing in this forum <3 <3 <3
     
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  6. Mel dCP

    Mel dCP Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Aw, I’m sorry you’re feeling so overwhelmed, it is a big thing to get your head around. Do you have a best friend or someone you hang out with at school who knows you have diabetes? We’re quite rare, us T1s, I don’t know any in real life to talk to about it, but I have made a few buddies on here and it’s great to have a moan to someone who really understands what it’s like.

    And it really does get easier with a bit of time - rather than a toddler I’ve started to think of it a bit like my cat. Cute and cuddly and easy to manage most of the time, but sometimes he brings me a dead rat lol.

    There’s always someone here to talk to in a PM, if you need - especially if you feel uncomfortable talking to real life friends. We’ll understand xxx
     
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  7. JoKalsbeek

    JoKalsbeek Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    Hey GlitterSparkles (I love your name!),

    I'm a T2, so I haven't said anything before because anything that goes for me, usually doesn't go for you. BUT. While I wasn't diabetic when I was your age, I was already chronically ill back then. I was always in pain, and always exhausted. And then there was depression and anxiety to deal with as well. It's hard to make people understand, especially when you're young (and people always assume for some reason that youth equals health), that there's really something wrong, that you're not just being lazy, or difficult or whatever they make up about you and not saying to your face. (Or are). For me, I was ashamed of feeling the way I did, so I made up the most elaborate lies to explain why I didn't do this or went to that. Drawback being: sooner or later you forget what you told to whom, and you're outed as a liar. Well, I was, anyway, because I didn't know how else to deal, and lying was something my aunts did out of habit, so i thought it was normal. It made my life a whole lot less complicated when I just told people who WANTED/NEEDED to know, what was going on with me. The people I picked because I trusted them with my health and wellbeing at the time. These days I'm really open about my medical issues, not just because it makes my life less complicated, like when I can do something one day and have to cancel the next because I just can't handle two days straight of activity. But also because I know a bunch of people like me on Facebook, and I tell my story because I think it might help them. Whether it is about meds, diet, depression, or how to cope... I'm open. But I'm also an adult, and I've had time to get used to being ill.

    Some things you need to realise: Type 1 is nothing to be ashamed of. It happened to you through no fault of your own, and you're dealing with it better than some people, honestly: you're asking questions and learning. That's good, and you can be proud of yourself. You've only just been hit with this; you can take as much time as you need to work through this, and you don't have to tell the world if you don't want to. But as it is a lot to take in, you might feel better if you talk to one or two people you trust. Fear and tension tend to grow if you keep them in, and when you get feedback from someone it might cast a different light on things. If nothing else, it might be a relief. I'm guessing in school the teachers know, and have learned what to do in case of a hypo or hyper. That's really all you need right now, aside maybe from friend's parents. If you're over at their place they might need to know what to do if something goes wrong. But it's up to you whom you talk to, and in how much detail. Just don't make it into some smothering secret... I've found illness easier to deal with when I didn't have to do it all alone anymore.

    Be good to yourself.
     
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  8. KK123

    KK123 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi Glitter, as you can see. it's hard enough for adults never mind a person who is 10 years old! I wonder if there are any others your age that you could talk to? It must be very hard trying to relate to all of us oldies! Maybe ask your diabetes team if they can put you in touch with other children? x
     
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  9. Diakat

    Diakat Type 1 · Moderator
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    Ask your parents to see if there is a JDRF group close to you. They do a lot of work with children. Also try Diabetes UK, they run events for youngsters. Meeting other people your age doing normal stuff (and managing diabetes) will hopefully help.
     
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  10. Coopsy91

    Coopsy91 · Member

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    What part exactly overwhelms you ? make a list, lets knock some of those negative thoughts away together.

    :)
     
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  11. GlitterSparkles

    GlitterSparkles Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    the needles in public

    going to school with it

    people knowing about it :(
     
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  12. GlitterSparkles

    GlitterSparkles Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    thank you:):bag::):bag:
     
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  13. briped

    briped Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    My oldest friend and her sister have T1, and were diagnosed when they were around 6, or so. We've known each other since we were 13 and went to school together. Never once have I heard anybody say anything negative to or about either of them because of their condition, and I honestly believe that I'd have been very surprised if I had. My friend had to eat a meal at 10am and inject, which she did in the classroom. Nobody batted an eyelid. They were all so used to that. It was part of her, and still is, of course.

    I don't know if my experience is of any help to you at all, but I really hope so. After all this was many years ago back in the mid 70es, and in another country, but would a classmate with a ... say a broken leg get negative attention in your class?
    Wishing you all the best. I know you can cope, because we're humans and tough.
     
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