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Fiasp Duration

Discussion in 'Insulin' started by Emck, Oct 15, 2019.

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  1. Emck

    Emck · Well-Known Member

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    Hi there, just wanted to gather opinions on Fiasp, as I have recently changed over.

    In a bid to maintain good control, I typically eat low GI foods (brown pasta, brown rice, brown bread etc.)

    I have been finding that the Fiasp struggles to match the duration of digestion for these foods, often petering out between 2-3 hours, often resulting in a small rise after eating.

    Has anyone else seen this?
     
  2. andi140373

    andi140373 Type 1 · Active Member

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    Since starting to loop I use a duration of 6 hours and this seems accurate as it appears to have a very long tail off where the dose is very low but does lower BG. Depending on the type of food I am eating I find a prebolus of 20 mins followed by an extended bolus of 1-3 hrs does the job unless very high fat or very high carb meal
     
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  3. Thomas the Tank

    Thomas the Tank Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Can I ask the dumbo question "What is Fiasp?"
     
  4. Glucobabu

    Glucobabu Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    It’s a faster acting insulin compared to NovoRapid. It seems to have a shorter duration which is what Emck above is concerned about. I have also read that it has a shorter shelf life outside the fridge.
     
  5. Thomas the Tank

    Thomas the Tank Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Thank you for the info
     
  6. mentat

    mentat Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    It's OK* to use NovoRapid for some meals and Fiasp for others. [*consult a doctor]

    I often do a "hybrid bolus" by doing two injections of different insulins for a meal. Some people mix them in a syringe, I know someone who does 50% Novo 50% Fiasp in a pump cartridge! They do this because NovoRapid is too slow but pure Fiasp irritates the pump sites.

    This is not for the faint of heart but I also use intramuscular Fiasp or NovoRapid to speed up their effects. I find intramuscular Novo to be a bit slower than Fiasp.
     
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  7. Emck

    Emck · Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for your input, I might do a basal test to see whether it's just my basal levels being a bit low.

    Fiasp has been working for me when I bolus right as I start to eat, I maybe could switch my bolus to post-meal for lower GI foods.

    As a general rule, I prefer them to their quicker-absorbed alternatives, so I will keep experimenting to see what happens?

    I had asked my DSN who said that she had seen evidence to suggest that Fiasp doesn't last the stated 4 hour duration for some people.
     
  8. db89

    db89 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Just thought I'd chime in to say I find Fiasp is usually finished around the 3 hour mark for me. I do a lot of split bolusing with it and use different sites depending on if I want any delayed absorption.
     
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  9. Amy Cecilia

    Amy Cecilia Type 1 · Member

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    I’m confused about all this. My consultant has recommended I change to Fiasp from Novo to act quicker and avoid “postprandial” spikes. So is it also possible that its effectiveness is shorter..... so why don’t I just take more Novo? Reluctant to change one set of issues for another.
     
  10. barrym

    barrym LADA · Well-Known Member

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    I've taken both and the difference IMHO is pretty minimal. There are graphs of the profiles of both online if you want to search them out. But as far as I can see, you'd have a job to change your habits or routine to take advantage. In my experience our condition had so many variables you end up having a stab at treatment on advance, then spend the next few hours fixing it☹️.

    YMMV
     
  11. urbanracer

    urbanracer Type 1 · Expert
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    I think it would kind of depend what your needs are. Novorapid (officially) takes 10 to 20 minutes to get going. Some people would say it takes longer. Taking more of it won't necessarily speed it up but you will have a bigger insulin spike at the 2 hour mark.

    That kinda works if you've eaten a lot of carbs so a higher dose has it's uses.

    If you need a faster acting insulin, then Fiasp might suit you better. In tests, (and it depends where you get your information from ) Fiasp reaches its maximum infusion rate between 7 to 10 minutes faster than Novorapid. But you have the same overall level of exposure.

    Google Fiasp Insulin Profile and Novorapid Insulin Profile for a graphical representation of what I've tried to explain.
     
  12. mentat

    mentat Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    If your sugar has a sharp rise immediately after eating, then slowly comes back down over several hours, this means your digestion acts faster than your insulin but you are probably on the right dosage. A faster insulin might be better matched to your digestion.

    OTOH if your sugar has a more gradual rise and then ends up too high after several hours, this is more likely too low a dose of insulin.

    Yes, it is possible that taking Fiasp will chop off the spike, but then run our later on and leave you high. As I have said, I tackle this by taking both Fiasp and NovoRapid (depending what I eat).
     
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  13. Gary61

    Gary61 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I use Fiasp with my Medtronic 670g pump and have programmed it for a 3hr time span. I normally have to pump more insulin 2 - 4 hrs after a high G.I. meal but it's having a pump makes this process far easier. When I was using a syringe, I just accepted that I would more than likely have to inject more insulin hrs after bolusing for a meal. At the end of the day, I'm achieving far better results with this insulin so I've just accepted that that's the way it needs to be. Nothings straightforward in this game lol
     
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