1. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android.
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Guest, we'd love to know what you think about the forum! Take the Diabetes Forum Survey 2021 »
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Diabetes Forum should not be used in an emergency and does not replace your healthcare professional relationship. Posts can be seen by the public.
    Dismiss Notice
  4. Guest, stay home, stay safe, save the NHS. Stay up to date with information about keeping yourself and people around you safe here and GOV.UK: Coronavirus (COVID-19). Think you have symptoms? NHS 111 service is available here.
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community »

Fussy Eater

Discussion in 'Newly Diagnosed' started by Becky38, Aug 29, 2018.

  1. Becky38

    Becky38 · Member

    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    9
    Trophy Points:
    23
    Hi guys
    Was diagnosed on Tuesday T2 and have started the LCHF diet (doctors advise) but I’m a fussy eater and looking the the recipes nothing is really taking my fancy any suggestions? Don’t want to eat just eggs and bacon for breakfast don’t like coconut and it seems to be in most of the dishes.
    Please help
     
  2. bulkbiker

    bulkbiker Type 2 · Oracle

    Messages:
    17,664
    Likes Received:
    11,894
    Trophy Points:
    298
    Any meat, any fish, butter, cream, cheese... none of those appeal? All low carb.
    Green veg, olives, avocado?
    Although I could probably live on bacon eggs and steak full time these days.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  3. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 (in remission!) · Legend

    Messages:
    25,060
    Likes Received:
    30,555
    Trophy Points:
    298
    There isn't a person in the world that is a more fussy eater than I am, but I have been on low carb/high fat for over 4 years. I also don't like coconut. In fact I don't like any nuts, so I don't eat them. It isn't compulsory!

    Meat, fish, butter, cream, cheese, most vegetables, berries, avocado, eggs, bacon, high meat content sausages, tomatoes, mushrooms. Have a look at dietdoctor. https://www.dietdoctor.com/low-carb/60-seconds
     
    • Like Like x 1
  4. Goonergal

    Goonergal Type 2 · Moderator
    Staff Member

    Messages:
    11,273
    Likes Received:
    18,317
    Trophy Points:
    298
    Hi @Becky38 and welcome. I’ll page @daisy1 for her welcome post with lots of useful information.

    I’m also a fussy eater so can empathise with you - also don’t like coconut! Is it just breakfast options you’re looking for, or meals in general?

    There are lots of experienced cooks on here, so if you post links to or mention recipes you’re interested in but don’t like the look of all the ingredients, I’m sure you’d get suggestions for substitutions - or let us know the kinds of things you do like to get more ideas: it’s hard to start from a blank page.

    Personally I stick to pretty simple meals involving protein and above ground vegetables, sometimes adding butter or a simple sauce.

    You might want to check out the thread ‘what have you eaten today’ in the low carb section of the forum. Lots of ideas there.
     
    • Like Like x 3
  5. Becky38

    Becky38 · Member

    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    9
    Trophy Points:
    23
    Mostly breakfast ideas as I’m eating turkey/chicken/pork and veg for lunch and dinner but so much information, think I’m just having a hard time taking it all in.
    Thanks
     
  6. Goonergal

    Goonergal Type 2 · Moderator
    Staff Member

    Messages:
    11,273
    Likes Received:
    18,317
    Trophy Points:
    298
    I rarely eat breakfast but it does tend to be eggs and bacon when I do! You could try making crustless quiche or egg muffins. Alternatively some berries and full fat yoghurt or cream, or just eat something you might eat for lunch or dinner. No reason that you have to eat what are traditionally thought of as breakfast foods.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  7. bulkbiker

    bulkbiker Type 2 · Oracle

    Messages:
    17,664
    Likes Received:
    11,894
    Trophy Points:
    298
    I too skip breakfast. This solves all the problems for what to eat and extends your overnight fast a bit which does all sorts of good things for your insulin levels too...win-win situation just a tea or coffee does me fine until lunch or even later.
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Agree Agree x 1
  8. miahara

    miahara Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    887
    Likes Received:
    811
    Trophy Points:
    133
    As a 'fussy eater' you are eating what you've eaten for years and your palate just isn't yet tuned in to alternatives. I was a bit like that prior to dx but since then I've discovered a vast range of foods that I've now come to enjoy, and to be honest what I eat now is far tastier and healthier than than the limited range I used to enjoy.
    If you are mainly concerned about breakfast - how about kippers or smoked salmon omelette, fried/grilled hallomi cheese with tomatoes.Low carb yoghurt with berries and/or nuts.
     
    • Like Like x 2
  9. daisy1

    daisy1 Type 2 · Legend
    Retired Moderator

    Messages:
    26,459
    Likes Received:
    4,876
    Trophy Points:
    248
    @Becky38

    Hello Becky38 and welcome to the Forum :) Here is the Basic Information we give to new members and I hope you will find it useful. Ask as many questions as you like and someone will help.

    BASIC INFORMATION FOR NEWLY DIAGNOSED DIABETICS

    Diabetes is the general term to describe people who have blood that is sweeter than normal. A number of different types of diabetes exist.

    A diagnosis of diabetes tends to be a big shock for most of us. It’s far from the end of the world though and on this forum you'll find well over 235,000 people who are demonstrating this.

    On the forum we have found that with the number of new people being diagnosed with diabetes each day, sometimes the NHS is not being able to give all the advice it would perhaps like to deliver - particularly with regards to people with type 2 diabetes.

    The role of carbohydrate

    Carbohydrates are a factor in diabetes because they ultimately break down into sugar (glucose) within our blood. We then need enough insulin to either convert the blood sugar into energy for our body, or to store the blood sugar as body fat.

    If the amount of carbohydrate we take in is more than our body’s own (or injected) insulin can cope with, then our blood sugar will rise.

    The bad news

    Research indicates that raised blood sugar levels over a period of years can lead to organ damage, commonly referred to as diabetic complications.

    The good news

    People on the forum here have shown that there is plenty of opportunity to keep blood sugar levels from going too high. It’s a daily task but it’s within our reach and it’s well worth the effort.

    Controlling your carbs

    The info below is primarily aimed at people with type 2 diabetes, however, it may also be of benefit for other types of diabetes as well.

    There are two approaches to controlling your carbs:
    • Reduce your carbohydrate intake
    • Choose ‘better’ carbohydrates
    Reduce your carbohydrates

    A large number of people on this forum have chosen to reduce the amount of carbohydrates they eat as they have found this to be an effective way of improving (lowering) their blood sugar levels.

    The carbohydrates which tend to have the most pronounced effect on blood sugar levels tend to be starchy carbohydrates such as rice, pasta, bread, potatoes and similar root vegetables, flour based products (pastry, cakes, biscuits, battered food etc) and certain fruits.

    Choosing better carbohydrates

    The low glycaemic index diet is often favoured by healthcare professionals but some people with diabetes find that low GI does not help their blood sugar enough and may wish to cut out these foods altogether.

    Read more on carbohydrates and diabetes.

    Over 145,000 people have taken part in the Low Carb Program - a 10 week structured education course that is helping people lose weight and reduce medication dependency by explaining the science behind carbs, insulin and GI.

    Eating what works for you

    Different people respond differently to different types of food. What works for one person may not work so well for another. The best way to see which foods are working for you is to test your blood sugar with a glucose meter.

    To be able to see what effect a particular type of food or meal has on your blood sugar is to do a test before the meal and then test after the meal. A test 2 hours after the meal gives a good idea of how your body has reacted to the meal.

    The blood sugar ranges recommended by NICE are as follows:

    Blood glucose ranges for type 2 diabetes
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 8.5 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (adults)
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 9 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (children)
    • Before meals: 4 to 8 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 10 mmol/l
    However, those that are able to, may wish to keep blood sugar levels below the NICE after meal targets.

    Access to blood glucose test strips

    The NICE guidelines suggest that people newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes should be offered:
    • structured education to every person and/or their carer at and around the time of diagnosis, with annual reinforcement and review
    • self-monitoring of plasma glucose to a person newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes only as an integral part of his or her self-management education

    Therefore both structured education and self-monitoring of blood glucose should be offered to people with type 2 diabetes. Read more on getting access to blood glucose testing supplies.

    You may also be interested to read questions to ask at a diabetic clinic.

    Note: This post has been edited from Sue/Ken's post to include up to date information.
    Take part in Diabetes.co.uk digital education programs and improve your understanding. Most of these are free.

    • Low Carb Program - it's made front-page news of the New Scientist and The Times. Developed with 20,000 people with type 2 diabetes; 96% of people who take part recommend it... find out why

    • Hypo Program - improve your understanding of hypos. There's a version for people with diabetes, parents/guardians of children with type 1, children with type 1 diabetes, teachers and HCPs.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  10. Krystyna23040

    Krystyna23040 Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,503
    Likes Received:
    7,453
    Trophy Points:
    178
    This is exactly what I found. I used to absolutely hate stilton cheese and now it is my absolute favourite. I loved rice before but now I just think it is bland and tasteless. Have just discovered how lovely fried halloumi cheese is - so the range of foods I am eating is still expanding. I thought I could never live without my morning cappuccino with real milk chocolate flakes on top. Now when I look at a cappuccino l just think 'yuk' how horrible.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  11. DCUKMod

    DCUKMod I reversed my Type 2 · Master
    Staff Member Administrator

    Messages:
    14,302
    Likes Received:
    8,225
    Trophy Points:
    298
    Hi Becky - It could be helpful if you posted what you used to do for breakfast. That might help poster be more focused on what you like/prefer.

    In the meantime, have a look at these: https://www.ditchthecarbs.com/23-easy-low-carb-breakfast-ideas/ , and https://lowcarbyum.com/category/breakfast/
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Agree Agree x 1
  12. PenguinMum

    PenguinMum Type 2 · Expert

    Messages:
    5,194
    Likes Received:
    15,011
    Trophy Points:
    198
    Hi Becky my breakfast was always toast prior to diagnosis. It might be worth trying some of the low carb/high protein breads around but you must test on your meter. I didnt really like any of them and could only have one slice so I gave up. Now I make Keto Cheese Scones and freeze a batch (3g each and you can lavish the butter) or Helmsley and Helmsley Flaxseed rolls which I bake in a (big) muffin tin and they only raise my BG by 0.5. You can google these recipes if you are interested.
    I sometimes join the family in eating cooked breakfast at rhe weekend.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  13. Pasha

    Pasha Prediabetes · Expert

    Messages:
    8,189
    Likes Received:
    15,930
    Trophy Points:
    198
    My best advice is "stop being fussy about your food' but instead be fussy about your BG levels. Now the good news, developing new eating habits generally tales about a fortnight then it easy dealing with lots of new choices.
     
    #13 Pasha, Aug 30, 2018 at 3:47 PM
    Last edited: Aug 30, 2018
  14. Ross.Walker

    Ross.Walker Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    291
    Likes Received:
    461
    Trophy Points:
    103
    Hi

    I tend to have greek yogurt with flax and chia seeds, wheat grass and spirulina in it with a few blueberries, . yes after 2 years I am bored to tears with it. However the benefits of discipline are worth it, my BGs are stable and I have a great life, so I can "put up" with another identical breakfast and salad lunch.

    Nothing wrong with being fussy as long as the food is good for you

    Ross
     
  • Meet the Community

    Find support, connect with others, ask questions and share your experiences with people with diabetes, their carers and family.

    Did you know: 7 out of 10 people improve their understanding of diabetes within 6 months of being a Diabetes Forum member. Get the Diabetes Forum App and stay connected on iOS and Android

    Grab the app!
  • Tweet with us

  • Like us on Facebook