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Gallstones

Discussion in 'Other Health Conditions and Diabetes' started by Amberleigh, Nov 12, 2016.

  1. Amberleigh

    Amberleigh Type 2 · Member

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    I wondered if anyone else had developed gallstones. I've felt dreadful on and off for a few days and am waiting an ultrasound.

    I'm really frustrated as I've done so well with my diet controlled type 2 getting my HB1AC down to 47 in September.

    It's getting me down even though I know there are worse things in life. Would love to hear from anyone who's been in the same position.

    Amber
     
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  2. GrantGam

    GrantGam Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Sorry to hear about your current situation, I'm sure things will improve in time:)

    Until other forum members supply feedback to this thread, you may want to chase up some of the members who have had gallstones on this thread:

    http://www.diabetes.co.uk/forum/threads/does-anyone-else-have-gallstones.98023/#post-1105868
     
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  3. Dadio

    Dadio Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I suffered for months with chest pains and was hospitalised twice only to be told there was nothing wrong.
    It wasn't until I went private they actually found Gallstones and I had my gall bladder removed. When they removed it they told me it was solid and full of cholesterol balls. Until then I wasn't diagnosed with diabetes but during my stay they ran tests and low and behold I was.
    I was lucky that until then I hadn't fought for control of the diabetes but the damage had started.
    I'm now still struggling to keep things in check as Im not good with self control and work away with a bad diet. This doesn't really help you but at least you know there's many people with similar circumstances.
     
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  4. Daffodils1

    Daffodils1 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi Amber, I had my gallbladder removed years ago.

    If you are eating a lot of fat, you may find it aggravates your gallstones, if it turns out you have them. You'll have googled it, but I thnk what happens is gallbladder responds to fat by producing gall, the producing of gall aggravates the stones, causes the pain etc.

    Hope you get some good professional advice soon.

    Worth really not eating much at all ahead of ultrasound, to make sure they can see what is or isn't there! I had to wait for second scan to get diagnosis, as they couldn't see stones on first scan - turned out there were lads f them there.

    If I had my time over I might do research just to check having gallbladder out is best option - I gather in some countries they are much less keen to take it out...

    All the best

    D
     
  5. Gemma2

    Gemma2 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi Amber
    Had my gall bladder removed 2 years ago as a day patient. The pain before was excruciating. Type 1 "oldie". Pain free ever since. Yippee
     
  6. Shar67

    Shar67 · Guest

    If your worried about maintaining a lchf diet if your fall bladder is taken out just change fat for protein, no red meat (or very occasionally) fish, and poultry are fine
     
  7. Totto

    Totto Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Low fat diets can cause gallstones as the bile just sits quietly in the gallbladder waiting to be used and eventually solidifies, while on a normal- or high fat diet it gets flushed out regularly. It's not uncommon to find your gallbladder a bit uncooperative at the start of a higher fat diet. Hopefully it sorts itself. I had gallstones passing once it was very painful but I still have my gallbladder in place and not had any problems for decades.

    Gallstones are more common if you are hypothyroid.
     
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  8. TorqPenderloin

    TorqPenderloin Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Not a bad suggestion at all. However, I had my gall bladder removed about 8 years ago, and I actually have very little trouble with fat. In fact, many people find that to be true.

    What I have the most trouble with are processed foods that are high fat AND high carb. I also have trouble with acidic alcoholic mixed drinks.

    Bottom line- we are all different, but the LCHF diet is great for me without a gall bladder.
     
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  9. shellysexbomb

    shellysexbomb Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I have a 22mm gallstone which is way too big to pass. The pain when it flares is horrific. Cant have surgery till I lose a significant amount of weight. You have my sympathy x
     
  10. Resurgam

    Resurgam Type 2 (in remission!) · Expert

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    I still remember the pain of getting rid of gallstones after an epic failure on low fat diets under doctor's control - fortunately they did go and I went back to my usual diet.
    I have read that if you lie on your right side that stones are less likely to pass out of the gall bladder and cause problems - the exit being on the left side of it.
     
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  11. Rachlou12

    Rachlou12 · Newbie

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    I had a similar issue I felt I'll all the time but when I'd visit my GP I'd get told I had a virus so I never bothered going back but after a year the pain got worst. U had my gallbladder removed a few weeks ago and I felt I'll constantly I couldn't eat so I'd be weak all the time doing simple tasks would make me I'll I'd spend.most days in bed and depression kicks in cause you don't feel normal. Everything becomes harder gradually and noone wants to listen. If b careful just incase u end up wth an infection as that what happened to me I'd keep an eye on the symptoms.
     
  12. Viv19

    Viv19 · Well-Known Member

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    I had my gall bladder removed about 4 years ago after years and years of nausea. For some reason I hadn’t had pain- the surgeon thought there would be ‘gall bladder sludge’ because the X-ray just showed a uniform mass, but it turned out to be packed with stones of all sizes. It took a while for the liver to adjust but now I can eat most things. Just sometimes the fat level is too much to cope with and I have a ‘wish I hadn’t eaten that’ moment. So there is hope. :))
     
  13. Listlad

    Listlad Prediabetes · BANNED

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    Same here. Sometimes with certain types and quantities of meat or even fatty fish, my system does not cope so well without the gall bladder. Outwith that all is okay. As I go higher fat in my diet I am learning to avoid what for me are the difficult forms of fattier foods.
     
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  14. SusieBrown65

    SusieBrown65 · Member

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    I have recently been diagnosed with gall stones after years of pain. I have a lot of minute stones which I have been told are the most likely to cause problems. My consultant advises me to have it out but I’m nervous of being worse after the op. Would welcome information from anyone who has had their gall bladder removed whether positive or negative so I can make an informed decision. Thanks
     
  15. HSSS

    HSSS Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I was misdiagnosed for 4yrs with reflux that I didn’t have, a torn rotator cuff was even diagnosed once after being blue lighted with a suspected heart attack from a particularly painful attack. Once I asked for a scan for gallstones they found a gallbladder full of stones, some far to large to pass. I reluctantly had surgery and am so glad now I did. No more pain. Initially I was very careful about eating fat post surgery but after a couple of months it improved a lot. Then I was diagnosed t2 and went low carb. Again initially eating high fat was tricky. So I added it in far more slowly and gave my body more time to adjust to the new levels and was fine. Most are. Now I can eat as much as I’d want to.

    Eating higher fat whilst still having gallstones can cause pain due to the squeezing action of the bile being flushed through the bladder to deal with the fat. Hence why low fat gets recommended, no squeezing no pain. It doesn’t cause it though. In fact low fat is a contributing factor to getting them. No fat eaten = no bile movement so it sits as sludge turning to stones.

    If they are very small it’s possible to pass them, in fact there are medications that very slowly help dissolve them. They aren’t used as drs are convinced they will only come back. True enough unless diet is permanently changed. But if you’ve recently gone low carb for life due to diabetes that’s not likely to happen is it? Might have a battle on your hands convincing them though. Also small stones can block ducts on the way out and cause more serious problems including pancreatitis and infections so that risk is worth considering.
     
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  16. Yai

    Yai Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I had my gallbladder removed by keyhole surgery 30 years ago. I felt instantly better and have not had any resultant problems - unless I have eaten vast amounts of double cream or other high fat food, when I was simply asking for trouble! I have also taken Metformin for around 25 years, and this has caused more digestive trouble than my gall bladder (or lack of) ever has.
     
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  17. Millimoi

    Millimoi · Member

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    I had my gallbladder removed age 15. It was so unexpected given my age that I was in hospital for two weeks before they discovered the cause. I would like to say all went well but unfortunately I went on to develop Sphincter of Oddi dysfunction after the surgery. I won’t go into detail about it as it’s very rare and not worth worrying about
     
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  18. DianaMC

    DianaMC Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    @Amberleigh and @SusieBrown65 I had gallbladder illness from an infection caused by ignored gallstones 6 years ago. I have never been so ill in my life! I didn't realise it, but I'd been ignoring the pain of the gallstones for 10 years - actually, I knew they were there but a) I didn't realise they could damage the gallbladder if ignored and b) I was scared of having an op, so I put it off. But the consultant said that the stones were scuffing the GB and causing the infection. If I didn't do something about it I was probably facing either death from gangrene or stomach damage from a burst gallbladder. That woke me up a bit! Plus I had two horrendous attacks where I was in the bathroom much of the night, trying to stop vomiting. Sorry this is very graphic, but I really regretted ending up as ill as it made me, through not understanding the way the gallbladder works.

    I did a lot of research in this area, during and after illness, and made notes about how to cope if you have GB illness (and especially if awaiting an operation) - it's all sitting in a folder because I've been meaning to write it all into a book for publication, to help other people. It's a lot of work to do that, though, and I already work a lot during the week (helping other people write books, as it happens!)

    As far as I'm aware, it's true what has been said here, about low fat diets often being the cause of the gallstones - fasting can be a problem in that regard, if it goes too far, too. But once you have developed a gallstone problem, fat can be the substance that causes pain, nausea, bloating, etc. It stimulates the muscles in the GB and can hurt like hell if you have a gallstone problem - the same as labour pains, because it's just like a contraction action. One exception is coconut oil, however. You may find you can ingest that with fewer problems, as it is not processed the same way in the body, as other oils.

    The gallbladder surgery was fine. I did have to spend longer under the knife, as I had developed what they call adhesions - I gather that means bits of extra skin where the body had been trying to cope with the problem. The consultant said that the gallbladder had been trying to repair itself internally and so part of the problem was a build up of extra cells inside - it was just getting too full up in there, one way and another! And it could no longer function properly. So really not much point in trying to hold on to it any longer. And if I did - well, probably death or serious injury.

    I have had better health since saying goodbye to my gallbladder, for sure. It took a while to be able to ingest fats again with relative comfort. Eating too much fat at once was a real no-no. But it became something I could judge quite well, both when I was ill and after the surgery. I worked out a plan and stuck to it. It included all the foods I knew I would be ok with and amounts of fat I could manage without bringing on the symptoms.

    These days I can enjoy high fat foods again, pretty much at a normal level. I only had to halt eating creamy/buttery cakes due to the sugar content, because I found out I had prediabetes about 5 years after recovery from the gallbladder problem! But if I ate a massive amount of something with high fat now, I would probably feel a bit of pain in the GB area - because the bile tubes have to work overtime to manage making bile to digest the fat. There's nowhere it's stored anymore. Kind of helps me to regulate what I eat though, without returning to being overweight! So it has its upsides, too.
     
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  19. Listlad

    Listlad Prediabetes · BANNED

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    A little bit of a mystery attached to the cause of gallstones. It is evident that in many cases they are formed with a high cholesterol content. That being so, I wonder what foods are likely to generate that high cholesterol content. In my case they were of a “cholesterol” type, so said the surgeon.
     
  20. DianaMC

    DianaMC Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    It’s an interesting question, but I think I asked something similar of the consultant surgeon, and he said it’s not that simple!

    The following website info is pretty comprehensive - boxes 1, 2 and 3 list different categories of risk factors for cholesterol type gallstones. Box 3 may hold some clues, but the general picture seems to indicate it’s as much to do with faulty processing in the body, related to factors besides which kinds of foods are ingested.

    That said, oestrogen is a problem - contributory factor - hence why more women than men get gallbladder disease (@Listlad and other guys, maybe you were just unlucky! Hereditary issues, maybe partly to blame ...? I noticed that one of my male ancestors, in army records, was noted to have had gallbladder troubles...)

    However, going back to a link between food and the cholesterol in gallstones - two of my female friends, who have survived breast cancer, have mentioned taking dairy out of their diets (on official medical advice) because it is linked with increased oestrogen. And the med literature says oestrogen is a risk for gallstones. So dairy foods might be a part of the equation? That would make sense in my case, at least, always being partial to cheese!

    https://pmj.bmj.com/content/77/906/221
     
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    #20 DianaMC, May 1, 2019 at 12:39 AM
    Last edited: May 1, 2019
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