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General advice

Discussion in 'Insulin Pump Forum' started by Dan, Mar 29, 2009.

  1. Dan

    Dan · Newbie

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    Hi guys. I'm new to this forum, and I'm glad to have found it! :)

    I was diagnosed with Type 1 aged 19 in February 2005, and have since been using Levemir for my basal and Novorapid for bolus.

    I have been really interested in getting an insulin pump since mid-2006 when I started researching it, and I've read up on the NICE.org.uk criteria. I don't meet either criteria as my control has been really good, and I don't have disabling hypos. I don't want to risk saying I do and risk having my driver's license taken away or anything!

    The thing that I'm prepared to do, and I'm hoping this would somehow allow me to get one, is I'm willing to PAY for the pump itself as I understand this is what NHS trusts are not wanting to pay.

    However, I've got some questions...

    1) Consumables every month, i.e. on prescription, would just be infusion sets, right? I already have Novorapid penfills on prescription, and insulin is easily taken out of those which could go in the reservoir.

    2) Does the reservoir that comes with the pump need to be replaced all the time, or does it use the same one?

    3) Do you think I could easily get the infusion sets (and reservoirs if they need replacing) on NHS prescription easily, or would I still need to put a case forward?

    The pump I really like the look of is the Animas 2020.

    Oh, and I live in Hertfordshire (South East england).

    Any help with this would be really appreciated.
     
  2. kegstore

    kegstore · Well-Known Member

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    Welcome Dan

    As regards paying for the pump yourself but getting supplies on prescription, I don't think this will work. The NHS has a controversial policy of "all or nothing", so if you paid for the pump yourself you'd be expected to fund the consumables too, which aren't cheap. My local Trust supplied my pump and pays for the infusion sets and reservoirs (which incidentally aren't prescription items, they're supplied by the pump manufacturer). It doesn't fund CGM sensors (about £400 a month), and if I paid for them myself my understanding is that they would stop paying for my infusion sets and reservoirs too. So, at the moment I get a rather erratic supply of sensors, and am waiting to hear back from the exceptional funding panel, but that's another story entirely...

    However this is only my experience, and I know there are other pump users out there who have funded their equipment privately. Hopefully one of them will respond to your message.

    Well done for considering pump therapy, the control possibilities are superb, if I had my way EVERY Type 1 would be offered this option, but that would be quite expensive... :)
     
  3. Dan

    Dan · Newbie

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    Ah, okay, thanks!

    That sounds familiar to be honest. I remember something with a patient who wanted to pay for some drug, but in doing so the NHS would stop everything else... seems a bit backwards to be honest!

    So I'm best off just speaking to my D consultant and seeing what he says, right? I just don't think I'd ever get one because my A1C's are fine, and don't have disabling hypos... :/
     
  4. kegstore

    kegstore · Well-Known Member

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    You're not wrong there. It also seems a false economy to deny pump treatment to "healthy" diabetics, just because their circumstances are not severe enough, yet. But we shouldn't knock the NHS too much, at least we don't live in the US...

    I think by now you should have received a PM from another member with lots of useful info on pumps and funding? Come back here if you've any further questions. All the best, Jo
     
  5. Dan

    Dan · Newbie

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    I certainly did, thanks!

    I'll keep you updated on how I get on. :)
     
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