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Gliclazide and Driving

Discussion in 'Driving and DVLA' started by Bernice1946, Nov 5, 2019.

  1. Bernice1946

    Bernice1946 · Member

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    I have just been prescribed Gliclazide and have been told that I have to check my sugar levels before driving. Does that include a 2.5 mile/15 minute school run? I’ve looked at all the websites and none of them mention short journeys. Does anyone know the answer?
     
  2. porl69

    porl69 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    @Bernice1946 it does not matter how short the journey is you need to be testing before you drive
     
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  3. Antje77

    Antje77 LADA · Moderator
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    If you have tested in the 2 hours prior to your drive you're legal to drive. But I wouldn't do so without checking first, especially as you have just started gliclazide and don't know yet how it will affect you.
    Car accidents due to hypo's are a real thing. Not something I would want to risk, especially not on a school run!

    Have you had a hypo yet? Do you know how your body reacts to it?
     
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  4. Bernice1946

    Bernice1946 · Member

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    No idea. I only collected them today so will take the first one tomorrow morning. My diabetic nurse told me about the driving but not in detail
     
  5. satindoll

    satindoll Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I hope she also told you that you must inform both your insurance company and the DVLA as failure to do so may
    1) invalidate your insurance and
    2) leave you liable for a big fine or/and loss of your licence if you do not tell the DVLA.
    3) be over 5 on your meter to drive.
     
  6. Janiefer

    Janiefer Type 2 · Newbie

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    Currently don't have any idea.
     
  7. Bernice1946

    Bernice1946 · Member

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    Thanks for the info
     
  8. Shimmy

    Shimmy Type 2 · Member

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    My practice nurse removed Glicrazide because of the this. I am going for a recheck of my bloods in January. Hopefully Glicrazide will be replaced with a more suitable drug.
     
  9. Oldvatr

    Oldvatr Type 2 · Expert

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    I am a driver using gliclazide, and my GP provided my meter and also the test strips in order to meet the DVLA requirements. You do not need to report hypo's where you are able to recover yourself without requiring medical assistance. You no longer need to report hypo's that occur during sleep. I test before driving only but I am lucky to be hypo aware so I get visual warning when my bgl dips

    Remember to keep the meter clock set to current time since this could be used in evidence as to when you last tested relative to the time of any incident being investigated.

    Su it is hypo history that matters, not the testing . Two assisted strikes in any 12 months and your have a problem with DVLA assuming you are a non HGV driver
     
  10. searley

    searley Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    The general rules are..

    Test before driving if you only drive occasionally. No matter how short the journey..

    If a frequent/pro driver.. test before 1st trip. Then at all other times through the day when driving make sure you have tested within the last 2 hours... if you reach 2hrs behind the wheel stop and test..

    Do not start a journey if you are under 5mmol. Do not drive if under 4mmol

    Carry fast acting and long acting carbs.. I carry glucotabs for fast and some breakfast bars for long acting.

    If you do hypo dobt drive afterwards for 45mins

    Ensure you know the symptoms of a hypo.

    Ensure you inform dvla and insurance you may go on a restricted year driving license

    If you have a severe hypo(where you need help of others) whilst not sleeping you are required to tell the dvla and licence can be revoked if you have this more than twice a year.. hypos are allowed if you self treat.

    As said above make sure date and time correct on meter as this will be used in evidence if needed. You will probably sign a disclaimer after informing the dvla that says you will test for driving.. so not doing so you could lose your license and more importantly not be insured..


    Sounds a lot... but it's actually quite easy
     
  11. Oldvatr

    Oldvatr Type 2 · Expert

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    I think you are quoting the requirements for insulin users, The rules for those non insulin users on diet or oral meds only are less demanding.

    https://www.gov.uk/diabetes-driving
     
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  12. searley

    searley Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I think what I say also includes tablets that can cause a hypo which gliclazide can.

    Or it certainly did when I was first diagnosed.
     
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  13. Oldvatr

    Oldvatr Type 2 · Expert

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    Glic was not invented whn I was dx'ed. However there wwas a time whrn DVLA added Glic to the insulin stream advice. It is no longer singled out and INF 188/2 leaflet does not mention it at all. The emphasis is now on the two strikes (severe hypo's) or developing other associated conditions such as strokes or loss of hypo awareness. Eyesight is another thing to keep tabs on, but basically the DVLA is no longer mandating so much, but is putting the onus on us reporting unfitness to drive to them. I suspect this will later become the GP making that decision on our behalf as was mooted a couple of years ago.

    But Glic is no longer singled out for special mention. However, the guidelines for insulin users are useful to know in case of hypo. I think if it was mandated for Glic users, then we would need to be sipported by GP in terms of test strips etc. So that may be why it is no longer mentioned.
     
  14. urbanracer

    urbanracer Type 1 · Moderator
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    Hi @Oldvatr , @searley

    The link you have provided, directs to a page where Group 1 (car and motorcycle) drivers can download form DIAB1.

    In section 1 the user is asked 'How is your diabetes treated' and is then required to tick a box for 'insulin' or 'tablets or non-insulin injectable'.

    The form makes it clear that testing is a legal requirement for drivers with 'insulin treated diabetes'. Rightly or wrongly, I infer therefore that it is not currently a requirement for T2's on tablets to test if driving a Group1 vehicle.

    For the benefit of anyone reading this thread in the future, Group 2 (bus and lorry) drivers are (at the time of writing, 01-Jan-2020) required to complete form VDIAB1SG. This form lists relevant medications ........

    upload_2020-1-1_9-12-41.png

    It would seem that for Group 2 drivers on tablets, the testing rules are similar to an insulin user.
     
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    #14 urbanracer, Jan 1, 2020 at 9:18 AM
    Last edited: Jan 1, 2020
  15. searley

    searley Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    It looks like the rules have changed in the last few years as about 3 years ago there difference was between whether a tablet could cause a hypo or not.

    I think it's good that the rules have relaxed a bit
     
  16. Oldvatr

    Oldvatr Type 2 · Expert

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    Relaxation is a double edged sword. The onus and hence any consequential blame is now placed squarely on the drivers shoulders to take full responsibility for reporting anything that may inhibit their control of a vehicle be it car, van, motormower or hearse. So as I said above, they no longer proscribe or mandate these things, but if it goes to court, then keep your test results handy.
     
  17. Shimmy

    Shimmy Type 2 · Member

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    Just to update, I did come off Gliclazide and this resulted in my readings going to 19, I was concerned about this and put myself back on Gliclazide, this resulted in an almost immediate fall in my readings to below 10. Today it was 7.9, the nurse who made the change is happy with what I did and on a positive note it’s made me take a daily reading and record them
     
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  18. lessci

    lessci Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Only need to inform if on insulin, I checked the website when 1st put on glic myself, and as the DVLA isn't notifiable you insurance company doesn't need to be notified either (I asked when I renewed, and they only care if you're on a restricted licence) see leaflet inf188x2 on the dvla website
     
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