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Going Barefoot

Discussion in 'Diabetes Discussions' started by Colin of Kent, Jan 29, 2019.

  1. Pinkorchid

    Pinkorchid Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Me to hate going totally barefoot but I wear flip flops in the summer in winter I do suffer from cold feet so always wear boots when out and slippers indoors
     
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  2. Prem51

    Prem51 Type 2 · Expert

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    I don't like wearing socks and shoes/boots. I wear sandals outdoors as soon as it's warm enough, probably from April/May to October, and in January/February as I'm abroad in a hot country.
    Indoors I'm usually barefoot, though wear socks in the winter.
    My feet are in better condition now than when I was working, as my feet aren't enclosed so much, and I apply foot cream now. Before I often had cracked heels and sometimes Athletes Foot between my toes. :sour:
     
  3. Colin of Kent

    Colin of Kent Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Good to know. That's what I'm hoping, as I gradually increase my barefoot time.
    That's interesting, because The Foot Collective seem to be saying that it's having out feet in shoes that causes problems like this, and that gradually going barefoot more will actually help heal. A recent podcast with Dr Rangan Chatterjee was informative for me.
    Yikes! Makes me wonder how the aboriginals coped...
     
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  4. Boo1979

    Boo1979 Other · Well-Known Member

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    Its not just about either the degree of feeling in the feet or the degree of control, although both play a part - slower / impaired healing, particularly of the extremeties ( feet & legs in particular ) is also an issue frequently related to diabetes
    I usually walk around barefoot at home but ensure I keep the floors very well hoovered so theres less chance of stepping on anything - thats generally worked fine but a couple of years ago I dropped a mug which smashed - thought Id got all the bits up until I managed to find a big shard one with my foot causing a pretty deep wound which bled like anything when I removed the shard. I felt it immediately and took all the necessary action i.e. Cleaned it applied antibiotic cream ( I always buy a tube when Im in the EU to bring home in case of emergencies). Everything healed up fine, but Im extra careful with the hoovering and at times like the present when Ive got workmen in the house I wear slippers with a reasonabley thick sole in case of dropped nails etc
     
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  5. Colin of Kent

    Colin of Kent Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Likewise. But I value the health of my feet, especially as they do have an impact on the rest of my posture. So I spend a lot of time hunting eBay bargains! Most of my shoes are second hand but hardly worn, and I make sure I get every last ounce of life out of them!
     
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  6. Robinredbreast

    Robinredbreast Type 1 · Oracle

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    I concur with you as I value the health of my feet very much, but times have been hard lately. I don't wear unsuitable shoes, high heels or cram my feet into narrow stiletto's :wideyed:

    These feet were made for walking and that's what there gonna do...............:)
     
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  7. Tipetoo

    Tipetoo Type 2 · Expert

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    Fourty thousand years of practice walking barefoot would have helped.
     
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  8. AloeSvea

    AloeSvea Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    What a fabulous thread! Going barefoot a lot has been my guilty secret, considering the advice we get to wear shoes, like, all the time, on diagnosis. It's great to read your experiences and have a looksie at The Foot Collective website.

    To walk barefoot in wet sand is just wonderful, and I love to do it. And if I do a wee sprint, I like to do that in firm sand by the waterline. There is something just fabulous about a wee jog barefoot on a beach, in the event I am up to it. Having read you all now in above, I won't feel guilty or anxious anymore and will put the 'always wear shoes' along with traditional diabetic-food advice.
     
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  9. jillsymes66

    jillsymes66 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I'm a bare foot person but since standing on an electric plug which was **** painful and became infected I'm a bit more wary. Can't walk over gravel like I used to though.
     
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  10. AloeSvea

    AloeSvea Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Yes @jillsymes66 I agree - stepping on plugs is the pits! I was extremely Sergeant-Major like with myself and my children when they were actual children about leaving plugs lying around due to a very painful experience or two or three stepping on them. Yeah, going barefoot, especially once with diabetes does entail being very very strict about stuff on the floor for sure. Also, watching out for bees and wasps! When walking barefoot outdoors on grass etc, for sure.
     
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  11. Freema

    Freema Type 2 · Expert

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    I always have bare feet at home, well I sometimes wear socks in the coldest winter. I also do get this thick skin on my heels but this kind of scraber takes it away easily also on dry feet and then I put some moisturizer on

    [​IMG]
    https://www.matas.dk/microplane-fodfil

    I don´t think it is dangerous to walk barefoot until one gets nerve problems in one's feet, the problem then is that it is probably not felt when that trouble arrives...
     
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  12. Spl@

    [email protected] Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    Picking no2 daughter up. Waiting outside now in flip flops.

    Your feet get used to everything the same as the rest of our bodies.

    Think about it. 10 deg in March feels great. 10 degrees in November feels cold. It's the ruddy freezing bit in the middle that changes what your used to.

    Well it is if you work outside a lot.
     
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  13. Grant_Vicat

    Grant_Vicat Don't have diabetes · Well-Known Member

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    Interesting thread this, especially as it makes me realise how much of my life was behaviour instilled by ingrained fear. My parents advised me through the 60s onwards never to go barefoot as Type 1 put me at the risk of serious complications later, including amputation. In 2001 the head of the diabetic clinic said to me "Your feet are immaculate Grant! I'm surprised, with your kidney function, that you haven't had at least one off by now". The doctor's reaction made me think the original advice was sound, but I agree it's a blanket insurance policy. On the other hand I never saw a podiatrist apart from the period between October 2103 and September 2104. Look after your pedal extremities!
     
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