1. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android.
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Guest, we'd love to know what you think about the forum! Take the Diabetes Forum Survey 2020 »
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Diabetes Forum should not be used in an emergency and does not replace your healthcare professional relationship. Posts can be seen by the public.
    Dismiss Notice
  4. Guest, stay home, stay safe, save the NHS. Stay up to date with information about keeping yourself and people around you safe here and GOV.UK: Coronavirus (COVID-19). Think you have symptoms? NHS 111 service is available here.
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community »

GPs reporting unfit to drive

Discussion in 'Diabetes Discussions' started by donnellysdogs, Nov 25, 2015.

  1. tim2000s

    tim2000s Type 1 · Expert
    Retired Moderator

    Messages:
    8,914
    Likes Received:
    11,774
    Trophy Points:
    198
    @CarbsRok, this isn't actually true. Form DIAB1 Online doesn't require any mention of neuropathy per se, rather whether you require special controls or an automatic gearbox to drive the car as a result of your condition. There is no requirement to tell the DVLA on the license application whether you have neuropathy.

    You are supposed to notify them:
    • If you have poor blood circulation or loss of sensation (such as caused by neuropathy) that means you need to drive only particular types of vehicles, such as those with automatic gearboxes or with hand operated accelerators or brakes
    • If you develop a complication of diabetes or any other medical condition that affects your ability to drive safely
    Which is may or may not be the case in @Molly56 's scenario, with being able to feel their feet.
     
  2. CarbsRok

    CarbsRok Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,696
    Likes Received:
    5,286
    Trophy Points:
    178
    @tim2000s sorry my mistake it always used to be on the forms.
     
    • Like Like x 2
  3. ladybird64

    ladybird64 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,731
    Likes Received:
    1,904
    Trophy Points:
    178
    I
    I can only speak for myself but if I knew my partner was not testing while on insulin (regardless of BG levels), had a significant loss of feeling in feet, had failing eyesight, and was deliberately falsifying the information that was being given to the HCP - I would report him like a shot. I think there is a level of personal responsibility here and if I knew all of the above, I would tell the HCP, not to mention DVLA. But all this was covered in your other thread..
    HCP's need to be able to inform the DVLA of irresponsible drivers and stop them from risking injury or death to others.
     
    • Like Like x 14
  4. zand

    zand Type 2 · Expert

    Messages:
    9,505
    Likes Received:
    15,702
    Trophy Points:
    198
  5. Jaylee

    Jaylee Type 1 · Moderator
    Staff Member

    Messages:
    12,518
    Likes Received:
    10,308
    Trophy Points:
    298
    In fairness.
    A GP will advise a driver to "hang up his car keys" if the patient is deemed to be medically unfit to operate a motor vehicle..
    It's down to the patient whether they heed this advice from the GP & action it by notifying DVLA & putting the car up on Autotrader.. So it's not going to come as much of a shock to the driver if DVLA revokes the driving licence..

    The patient will basically already be "informed" by the GP's aforementioned recommended advice.?! o_O
     
    • Like Like x 2
  6. donnellysdogs

    donnellysdogs Type 1 · Master

    Messages:
    13,196
    Likes Received:
    12,459
    Trophy Points:
    298
    There are a lot of medications that patients should inform DVLA of their usage. Some for depression...
    I know 5 years ago with my driving incident that after phoning DVLA and informing them that their lengthy drawn out processes were making me depressed I suddenly two days later had a further letter from them stating I had not informed them of all my medical circumstances. When I phoned to ask them what they were referring to it was because I had stated they were making me depressed- they wanted to have further evidence of any medication prescribed for the depression and that I wasn't going to deliberately kill myself driving...

    There are a lot of conditions that are reportable to DVLA and also a lot of medications.

    Patients are not always aware of this.
     
    • Like Like x 4
  7. zand

    zand Type 2 · Expert

    Messages:
    9,505
    Likes Received:
    15,702
    Trophy Points:
    198
    I certainly wasn't aware of it. Thinking back when my GP prescribed my antidepressants he did very clearly ask me if I felt suicidal, so maybe that's one of the reasons why. Interestingly one of the side effects on the leaflet is listed as 'suicidal tendencies' too. :rolleyes:
     
    • Like Like x 2
  8. Jaylee

    Jaylee Type 1 · Moderator
    Staff Member

    Messages:
    12,518
    Likes Received:
    10,308
    Trophy Points:
    298
    All these medications & conditions are on the DVLA questionare though. They check this out with the GP..
    It's strange this issue arose with your experience.. It's normally a straight forward process. (As long as ones "medical history" tallies up with the GP's.)
     
    • Like Like x 4
  9. donnellysdogs

    donnellysdogs Type 1 · Master

    Messages:
    13,196
    Likes Received:
    12,459
    Trophy Points:
    298
    Mine was purely because I told them that I was under GP for depression because of DVLA dragging heels. So my fault. I wasn't aware that depression or tablets for it were notifiable. When I checked on website I was amazed at qty of illnesses and medications that were notifiable!

    At the time an elderly neighbour was driving his jag with two full cataracts!! So this really narked me too!! He said that he wasn't going to give up driving...

    We have intentionally since my driving incident bought properties with easy access to shops, buses, hospitals. Pity others can't think to do the same. My parents included!!
     
    • Like Like x 2
  10. Jaylee

    Jaylee Type 1 · Moderator
    Staff Member

    Messages:
    12,518
    Likes Received:
    10,308
    Trophy Points:
    298
    To be fair, maybe financial circumstance is a primary reason most folk can't afford a property in a "catchment area"..

    Sorry to hear about your problems resolving the DVLA issue..
    Are/where you under the GP for depression brought on by the DVLA?
     
    • Like Like x 2
  11. donnellysdogs

    donnellysdogs Type 1 · Master

    Messages:
    13,196
    Likes Received:
    12,459
    Trophy Points:
    298
    I'm not rich either to afford a "catchment area"...... Just had to do it for my health!

    I was actually living 10 miles away from DVLA offices at the time. I think I went on to citilopram for depression at the time...

    Issues with DVLA were sorted!:)
     
  12. Jaylee

    Jaylee Type 1 · Moderator
    Staff Member

    Messages:
    12,518
    Likes Received:
    10,308
    Trophy Points:
    298
    Lol. I know what your saying.. However. In my location now. Or even the city I was brought up in.
    The only way most of us could pull that off is breaking in & "sqatting" while either the owners are wintering abroad/London during the week/second home on the coast.
    .... or the students the property is let to are on a break.! ;)
     
  13. donnellysdogs

    donnellysdogs Type 1 · Master

    Messages:
    13,196
    Likes Received:
    12,459
    Trophy Points:
    298
    We are pretty much "nomads"!! We've moved pretty much every 3 years (maximum) for the last 30 years. From Bournemoth to London to Midlands to Wales to East Anglia now. Solicitors and estate agents have all our money!!

    A member of my family is too "stressed" to work as a Bank Manager. (Whilst he get full sick pay). He isn't too stressed to go out for weekends away or holidays or playing football.
    However he has lived in the same large house for 'mega' years and will not a) consider moving job or b) move house and downsize.

    To me health is more important than anything.

    It makes me annoyed to be honest that my family member is just playing a game....

    When someone is that "stressed" by job...sorry, you change job.
     
  14. Brunneria

    Brunneria Other · Moderator
    Staff Member

    Messages:
    20,944
    Likes Received:
    34,584
    Trophy Points:
    298
    Where i work, people are actively discouraged from making judgements like this.

    Work stress is massively relieved by holidays, hobbies and getting out of the house.
    Pressuring people who are already stressed into hiding in their homes, as if they are doing something wrong, is not helpful to them.

    If that kind of comment were made at my work, the speaker would be investigated for workplace bullying.
     
    • Like Like x 12
  15. donnellysdogs

    donnellysdogs Type 1 · Master

    Messages:
    13,196
    Likes Received:
    12,459
    Trophy Points:
    298
    To me its not right that magically stress goes when sickpay runs out.

    I have always been very sympathetic to persons suffering from depression and stress etc but at some point rather than hoping for redundancy then perhaps if a job is too stressful then a change of career should be considered. I have had to do it previously.....many persons change career because of stress, depression.
     
  16. sanguine

    sanguine Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,341
    Likes Received:
    9,637
    Trophy Points:
    178
    Sweeping generalisation and possibly offensive to many - including on here.

    Change job or career? - if only it was that simple ...
     
    • Like Like x 2
  17. ladybird64

    ladybird64 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,731
    Likes Received:
    1,904
    Trophy Points:
    178
    While I'm very aware that this is veering off topic, there's a few points that should really be addressed in regards to your post DD. Maybe it could come in a seperate post under the title "Scroungers"...
    Do you have any idea how much SSP is? Do you think your relative is living it up while in receipt of it? Unless he has sat down with you and discussed how his workplace stress has affected him in his everyday life, how do you know how Ill he is? Have you had the discussion or are you making assumptions? His illness - and depression is an illness - manifests in different ways. How it affects him is between him and his doctor, unless he's shared the details with you.
    You say you are sympathetic but you seem to be judgemental and I wonder why. It's not the first time I have commented on a post where you seem to be making judgements about others without knowing their personal circumstances.

    Perhaps you should speak out to the people who are bothering you and tell them what you think of them? Might be beneficial in getting the full picture.
     
    • Like Like x 2
  18. donnellysdogs

    donnellysdogs Type 1 · Master

    Messages:
    13,196
    Likes Received:
    12,459
    Trophy Points:
    298
    I have the full picture of my relative...
     
  19. ladybird64

    ladybird64 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,731
    Likes Received:
    1,904
    Trophy Points:
    178
    Glad to hear he has discussed his personal business with you. As he is a bank manager, and no doubt on an excellent salary, I'd love to know why he prefers under £90 per week, which is what SSP is - plus it is payable for a set period of time. But as you have the full picture, you'll know.
    I guess these posts will be axed as off topic. Maybe they really should be addressed elsewhere but certain things just cannot be ignored.
     
  20. Daphne917

    Daphne917 Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,903
    Likes Received:
    7,567
    Trophy Points:
    198
    My husband had to get a letter from the DVLA stating they were happy for him to drive after he had his pace-maker fitted before they were prepared to continue to insure him.
     
    • Like Like x 4
  • Meet the Community

    Find support, connect with others, ask questions and share your experiences with people with diabetes, their carers and family.

    Did you know: 7 out of 10 people improve their understanding of diabetes within 6 months of being a Diabetes Forum member. Get the Diabetes Forum App and stay connected on iOS and Android

    Grab the app!
  • Tweet with us

  • Like us on Facebook