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Hi All, Had The Wake Up Call.

Discussion in 'Newly Diagnosed' started by Terryp, Aug 16, 2018.

  1. Terryp

    Terryp · Member

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    hello all and firstly thanks for the site, it's a real bonus to find somewhere to get some real sense of what this all is. I had my type 2 diagnosed today, my score was 59, not really sure what all this test stuff means but I will figure it out.

    I was normally pretty active and having had a heart attack at 39 I was always weary of diabetes coming along, thankfully I don't take life too seriously, but when the nurse mentioned possible issue including blindness the torch paper was lit. As an astronomy nut I won't get much viewing done being unable to see so I have decided that from Saturday I will wake up and begin looking after myself properly. I am a sugar mad idiot, love cakes, love all the bad things, but I thank my GP for the blood test, it may have changed my life.

    I'll look forwards to getting through the forums and all the tips on the way. Once again, good to meet you all and best wishes. Terry
     
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  2. miszu

    miszu Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi, welcome!

    Very glad for ur change of mind! The forum helped me a lot when I was newly diagnosed, sure it ll help u too:))

    X
     
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  3. rhubarb73

    rhubarb73 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hello Terry. Welcome aboard. Right now I expect you are in a bit of a blur. I remember how it feels to get that diagnosis and then venture into this strange new world. Trust me, your life is about to get a whole lot better.
    Firstly I will tag @daisy1 who will in the next couple of days post here for you a welcome pack of info for new members.
    I was a new member just over 3 months ago and I found it really useful.
    Today, having started a bit higher than you with a score of 66, I am already back in normal territory of 40.
    It can be done, and lots of T2's here have done it. Expect a consistent theme in their responses:
    - low carb, high fat diets
    - get a meter and test your blood before and after (2 hrs) meals
    - exercise a bit more than you have been
    - use this site, keep coming back, share your progress, ask lots of questions
    Having had heart disease you should consult with your GP before starting a new diet.
    But put simply, if you have been living with carbs on tap then switch off the tap. Take control.
    All the best sir.
     
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  4. Terryp

    Terryp · Member

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    Thanks Rhubarb, I have read a few things so far, especially the health kick, From Saturday I am going to try to defeat this issue by hitting it head on. I was not told by the diabetic nurse to test anything, she just put me on a drug and said to go back in two weeks to have another blood test. She was very good mind you with her input on things. But thanks for the welcome and well done yourself for bringing down your score, it's good to see things work and it's something to aim for.
     
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  5. Terryp

    Terryp · Member

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    Thanks miszu, best wishes.
     
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  6. Rachox

    Rachox Type 2 (in remission!) · Moderator
    Staff Member

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    Hi Terryp and welcome to the best corner of the internet for us Type 2s!
    I love your title, very apt. My diagnosis was definitely a kick up the proverbial to get healthier. With help and support I have in the last 15 months lost a shed load of weight and got my HbA1c down ratio normal levels.
    Can I just ask what tablets you are taking? Low carb eating is definitely the route to take but caution needs to be exercised with some tablets that you don’t end up too low, or hypo. If it’s just Metformin you’ve been given then that’s not a worry.

    Edit for typos
     
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    #6 Rachox, Aug 16, 2018 at 12:44 AM
    Last edited: Aug 16, 2018
  7. zand

    zand Type 2 · Expert

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    Hi welcome :)
     
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  8. Prem51

    Prem51 Type 2 · Expert

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    Welcome to the forum @Terryp. Have a read round the threads and ask any questions you want to. The people on here are friendly and supportive, and you will get a lot of good advice.
     
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  9. daisy1

    daisy1 Type 2 · Legend
    Retired Moderator

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    @Terryp

    Hello Terry and welcome to the Forum :) Here is the Basic Information we give to new members and I hope you will find it useful. Ask as many questions as you like and someone will help.


    BASIC INFORMATION FOR NEW MEMBERS

    Diabetes is the general term to describe people who have blood that is sweeter than normal. A number of different types of diabetes exist.

    A diagnosis of diabetes tends to be a big shock for most of us. It’s far from the end of the world though and on this forum you'll find well over 235,000 people who are demonstrating this.

    On the forum we have found that with the number of new people being diagnosed with diabetes each day, sometimes the NHS is not being able to give all the advice it would perhaps like to deliver - particularly with regards to people with type 2 diabetes.

    The role of carbohydrate

    Carbohydrates are a factor in diabetes because they ultimately break down into sugar (glucose) within our blood. We then need enough insulin to either convert the blood sugar into energy for our body, or to store the blood sugar as body fat.

    If the amount of carbohydrate we take in is more than our body’s own (or injected) insulin can cope with, then our blood sugar will rise.

    The bad news

    Research indicates that raised blood sugar levels over a period of years can lead to organ damage, commonly referred to as diabetic complications.

    The good news

    People on the forum here have shown that there is plenty of opportunity to keep blood sugar levels from going too high. It’s a daily task but it’s within our reach and it’s well worth the effort.

    Controlling your carbs

    The info below is primarily aimed at people with type 2 diabetes, however, it may also be of benefit for other types of diabetes as well.

    There are two approaches to controlling your carbs:
    • Reduce your carbohydrate intake
    • Choose ‘better’ carbohydrates
    Reduce your carbohydrates

    A large number of people on this forum have chosen to reduce the amount of carbohydrates they eat as they have found this to be an effective way of improving (lowering) their blood sugar levels.

    The carbohydrates which tend to have the most pronounced effect on blood sugar levels tend to be starchy carbohydrates such as rice, pasta, bread, potatoes and similar root vegetables, flour based products (pastry, cakes, biscuits, battered food etc) and certain fruits.

    Choosing better carbohydrates

    The low glycaemic index diet is often favoured by healthcare professionals but some people with diabetes find that low GI does not help their blood sugar enough and may wish to cut out these foods altogether.

    Read more on carbohydrates and diabetes.

    Over 145,000 people have taken part in the Low Carb Program - a 10 week structured education course that is helping people lose weight and reduce medication dependency by explaining the science behind carbs, insulin and GI.

    Eating what works for you

    Different people respond differently to different types of food. What works for one person may not work so well for another. The best way to see which foods are working for you is to test your blood sugar with a glucose meter.

    To be able to see what effect a particular type of food or meal has on your blood sugar is to do a test before the meal and then test after the meal. A test 2 hours after the meal gives a good idea of how your body has reacted to the meal.

    The blood sugar ranges recommended by NICE are as follows:

    Blood glucose ranges for type 2 diabetes
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 8.5 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (adults)
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 9 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (children)
    • Before meals: 4 to 8 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 10 mmol/l
    However, those that are able to, may wish to keep blood sugar levels below the NICE after meal targets.

    Access to blood glucose test strips

    The NICE guidelines suggest that people newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes should be offered:
    • structured education to every person and/or their carer at and around the time of diagnosis, with annual reinforcement and review
    • self-monitoring of plasma glucose to a person newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes only as an integral part of his or her self-management education

    Therefore both structured education and self-monitoring of blood glucose should be offered to people with type 2 diabetes. Read more on getting access to blood glucose testing supplies.

    You may also be interested to read questions to ask at a diabetic clinic.

    Note: This post has been edited from Sue/Ken's post to include up to date information.
    Take part in Diabetes.co.uk digital education programs and improve your understanding. Most of these are free.

    • Low Carb Program - it's made front-page news of the New Scientist and The Times. Developed with 20,000 people with type 2 diabetes; 96% of people who take part recommend it... find out why

    • Hypo Program - improve your understanding of hypos. There's a version for people with diabetes, parents/guardians of children with type 1, children with type 1 diabetes, teachers and HCPs.
     
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  10. NicoleC1971

    NicoleC1971 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hello and Welcome. Hope you're not getting starry eyed with all the info coming your way?! Lots of inspiration here to get you looking at the heavens for a long while to come. Good luck!
     
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  11. Terryp

    Terryp · Member

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    Thanks all for your kind comments, spending a bit of time trawling through the forums, huge kudos to everyone for making the site so informative.
     
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  12. Terryp

    Terryp · Member

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    Thank you daisy, that makes for some great reading, very informative.
     
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  13. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 (in remission!) · Guru

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    Are you intending to ignore your nurse when she tells you not to test? I hope so! Without your own meter you are working blind and will never know which foods are your personal danger foods. It isn't just sugar and sweet stuff - rice, pasta, bread, potatoes, porridge and cereals are all culprits in raising blood sugar levels, so you do need a meter to see whether you can cope with these.
     
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  14. kitedoc

    kitedoc Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi @Terryp, Welcome to a site where less is better ! In general the higher the soccer score etc the better. But here getting the 'score' down to a better level is the aim. Please stay well, enjoy the site, the humour etc.
     
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  15. margarett89

    margarett89 Family member · Member

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    Hey, nice that you're here with us. if you need help - do not be afraid to ask :) good luck
     
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  16. Glennis67

    Glennis67 Type 2 · Active Member

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    Hi Terry. There is hope, and I’ve found this forum is absolutely brilliant. I was diagnosed three months ago at 48.6, so only just diabetic type 2 - I appreciate being caught so early.

    I’ve stuck to Carb counting, around 60g-90g a day which is easy to get used to. My reading is now 40 so “normal” and lower than pre-diabetic. It can be done. Concentrate on the vegetables, cutting out the rubbish and don’t try to substitute sweet stuff with chemicals. You will lose the sweet tooth, especially when you know how important it is to your future. Think of sugar as toxic in your blood.

    I was addicted to Percy Pigs and Jelly Babies - if I can do it, you can too.

    Good luck, if you need support we’re all here. Remember the astronomy!
     
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    #16 Glennis67, Aug 19, 2018 at 5:42 PM
    Last edited: Aug 19, 2018
  17. Terryp

    Terryp · Member

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    Hi glennis, at the moment the whole thing is a minefield, the chemical bit you mentioned is a great idea, I have replaced sugar with sweeteners, I am actually already sick of sweeteners and my goal this week is to dump them.

    I think the hard bit is that until I get my referral to the hospital and the dietician side of it I am flummoxed as to what is what. I am grateful they diagnosed me now rather than when it's all gone too far so my usual move is to carry on smiling and to enjoy the learning kerb. Great to see you are hitting the low scores and long may it last.

    Terry
     
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