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Holiday

Discussion in 'Newly Diagnosed' started by lorna_fletcher, May 15, 2018.

  1. lorna_fletcher

    lorna_fletcher Type 1 · Active Member

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    Hope someone can help.

    I have just been diagnosed type 1 not even a week ago and I have a holiday 18th June to Gran Canaria all inclusive . Time different is only 1 hour so don’t think that will effect my timings really.

    Does anyone have any tips for being away, food wise, alcohol etc... I’m stressing out about it now and not looking forward to it anymore
     
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  2. ExtremelyW0rried

    ExtremelyW0rried Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Have you got travel insurance? I probably wouldn't go to be honest... it's very early days and might be more worry than it's worth.
    If you want to go then speak to your team about it some more?
     
  3. Diakat

    Diakat Type 1 · Moderator
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    I spent Easter in Mallorca all inclusive. I ran a bit higher than usual but had a great time.
    Are you going with family or friends as you may need to ask someone with you to keep an eye on you in case of hypo.
    Heat can make insulin act quicker.
    Pack your insulin and kit in hand luggage.
    Check with medics that they are happy for you to go at this stage.
    Have fun...
     
  4. Alexandra100

    Alexandra100 Prefer not to say · Well-Known Member

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    You might like to watch this video from Dr Bernstein:
    http://www.diabetes-book.com/video-travel-for-diabetics/
     
  5. Circuspony

    Circuspony Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I went to Spain 3 weeks after T1 diagnosis last year. Heat seems to lower my insulin requirements so my ratios changed a bit, but if you're sensible and have basic carb counting in place you'll be fine.

    I didn't have my licence back from the DVLA so my hubby had to do all the driving - a downside for him, but fine for me!
     
  6. urbanracer

    urbanracer Type 1 · Moderator
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    I was diagnosed 2 weeks before my 54th Birthday, and a week before a 10 night vacation in Grand Canaria. It never really occurred to me not to go and I recall it was a bit hectic rushing around getting supplies sorted out before the flight.

    I can't pretend it was all plain sailing as I felt a bit ropey as my blood glucose levels came down but if I was in the same position again I'd still go. You may need to be a little more sensible than normal, and understand that alcohol usually lowers blood glucose levels. The warmer weather may improve your body's ability to absorb insulin, again lowering your glucose levels further and faster than you expect. Just keep testing and make sure your travelling companions know how to help you in the event of a hypo. Keep a sugary drink and some carbs nearby.

    Try not to stop yourself from doing the things you want to do. Just stick 2 fingers up at diabetes and shout something rude - as loud as you can.

    (To the innocent bystander, a hypo may look like drunkeness and they might ignore you. Brits abroad and all that!)
     
  7. lorna_fletcher

    lorna_fletcher Type 1 · Active Member

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    How often would you check sugars abroad due to absorption & alcohol lowering them? I’m checking them every 2 hours just now.
     
  8. h884

    h884 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi there, Speak with your team, they will give advice you need. They will give you a letter which explains why you must carry your kit with you and it must not go in the hold. One piece of advice I was given was to split my supplies with one of the people I was travelling with. That way if my hand luggage got lost I would still have supplies.

    You do need to let your travel insurance company know

    Take a few additional precautions as suggested by other forum members and things will be fine
     
  9. Circuspony

    Circuspony Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I check about 7-8 times a day normally - more if I'm driving. It was probably the same while I was away. I also wore a medical bracelet saying I had T1d
     
  10. urbanracer

    urbanracer Type 1 · Moderator
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    I'm lucky now as I have the Libre and can scan as often as I need to when travelling. I still take the bloody thirsty one with me for emergencies though.

    Back then I was only testing before and after meals and maybe a couple of times during the evening. As my glucose levels were still coming down, I did feel pretty rough so I probably didn't drink as much as I would have.

    You'll probably soon get used to the way you feel and be able to sense high and low glucose levels and it will be a good indication of when to test. Alcohol of course, dulls the senses somewhat and may impair your judgement.

    Have a good time and send us picture.
     
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  11. kitedoc

    kitedoc Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I envy you! Sounds like an idyllic place for jollies.
    When I travel I plan ahead as best I can. As long as my Bsls are stable and there have been no recent hypos my driver's license in Oz allows me to drive, provided I keep my BSL above 5 mmol/l) do if in doubt at this early stage you may wish to avoid driving yourself. If I am being driven say in a bus etc I ensure that I have things to eat on me, not locked away in a bagge apartment. That applies to plane travel too. Muesli bars and whatever water I am allowed in the bus, plane etc. Plus my insulin with spares syringes, testing equipment, pump supplies, batteries etc. I ensure that there are also these supplies in my baggage and, if I am going with a friend I ask them to carry a spare kit in their baggae too plus some sugar like glucose tablets in case I use up my supply. I never rely on the timetable of travel, there can be unexpected delays etc. I prepare for the worst, hope for the best. ( line credited to the character Jack Reacher, author Lee Child.)
    Having an ID bracelet, necklace stating what my health condtiions is vital. If I am unconscious, how else will someone know that I have diabetes, asthma ect and what I am allergic to? I use a company called MedicAlert and wear their Sports wrist band which can survive getting wet and does not tangle as much as a necklace or loose bracelet. See what other writers, your DN, doctor etc recommend for you.
    Counting carbs for meals is best I find. I avoid heavy thick sauces, desserts ( except fresh fruit),. and fruit juices. I make sure I have food in my room especially for supper.
    Having a stomach upset whilst away makes my daibetes management difficult. The upset tends to keep my blood sugars up so I still keep giving myself insulin. I have never gone hypo at these times. I use solutions like Gastrolyte, flattened sweet lemonade or Coac-Cola( sometimes there is a God). (leave lemonade/Coca COLA out to flatten in a glass, or heat if gently in a microwave to drive the bubbles out).L:eek:tes and lots of fluid in. I carry Travelan as a treatment as well as loperimide ( but realising that loperimide slows things down but does not cure anything, only helps sometimes to get from A to B).If I get blood in the stool or have not been able to pass urin for 8 hours I seek medical help asap) Before you leave on holiday talk to your DN and doctor about sick day plans.
    Exercise
    inuitially raises my Bsl if it is very taxing (lots of glucose coming out of muscle storage) but later lowers my blood sugar for up to 12 hours afterwards. Light exercise does not raise it so much initially. And when out walking, sightseeing etc meals might be delayed so I ensure I have food to munch on. I used to have extra food to eat before and after exercise as a way to allow for the exercise burning up some of my sugar reserves. Exercise in afternoon and evening is the worse, because the stored up sugar in my muscles is partly emptied out to work my muscles and about maybe 4 hours plus afterward my muscles demand a payback of sugar and yes, that comes out of the blood stream, so I watch for hypos in the early morning! My way, and you will need to ask your doctor and DN for yourself, is to reduce my insulin before the exercise but still watch out later and think abouit a heartier supper than usual and about getting up at say 2 am and each one to two hours maybe to check bsls. Morning esxercises requires my viligence in the afternoon, evening particularly. I have used simlar regimes for exercise on 7 to 8 day canoe trips.
    Alcohol is a tricky beast. What it does to me is that it stops my liver from releasing sugar stores if I have a hypo. That is bad news, made even worse if I am arrested for appearing to be drunk when in fact it is a hypo causing my less than exemplary behaviour !! ( and why having an ID bracelet is so important, most police are trained to look for them).Sweet alcohol drinks like dessert wines, mixers with non-local drinks ertc also upset the blood sugar. For these reasons I abstain from alcohol. The choice is yours. I hope the above helps. The forum is here to help as is your DN and doctor.
     
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  12. SueJB

    SueJB Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi @lorna_fletcher or should that be "hola" You must go on holiday and you mustn't be stressed. I went to Riga 2 weeks after diagnosis and didn't know diddly about T1......... so I drank lots of beer, cider wine, ate crisps, had juice for breakfast and bread in fact all the bad stuff I just didn't know it was bad and didn't feel any worse for it...... but that's me. I don't eat/drink that now though and am not recommending it. I was only testing before meals and wasn't quite sure of insulin to carb ratio but I managed fine.
    I think the tips you've been given about getting travel are good. Get travel insurance, I use Marks and Spencers. Be prepared for airport delays and have fruit pastilles and muesli bars with you just in case. Carry your insulin with you on the plane, I bought a Frio bag for this. It looks a bit like a pencil case. Take spare insulin, lots of stabbers etc. Get a diabetes bracelet and get a letter from your diabetes team that says you need to carry your kit on the plane.

    But don't stress. Same as @urbanracer, my BG was running high anything from 13mmols -6. I had fun, enjoyed everything and did two fingers to diabetes as he's advised.

    I'm off to Turkey next week, so I'll be doing everything you've read, I'll just eat differently, low carb and stick to wine or G&T.
    I might check BG a bit more but you doing every 2 hrs which I think is too much but you might have been told to do this, I don't know.
    Have a brilliant holiday, post a pic so we can see how you get on.
     
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  13. kitedoc

    kitedoc Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Addit: If I am unsure how good and accessible pharmacy/chemist services are where i am holidaying I remember the words many years ago of a no-nonsense DN. Both diabetic gals and guys get thrush easily so make sure you think to take some anti-thrush cream for use on "intimate areas". That was followed by a 'sermon' on use of condoms plus as a funny aside that a condom can be fitted over a suitably sized tube of glucose gel or powder to waterproof it when swimming ( I would tuck it in my bathers or bather's pocket if there was one.) And skin-diving is generally a no-no for those on insulin. If someone has a hypo underwater they may not be able to tell up from down, and may take off their mask in the confusion, inhale water and die. I know of people that have drowned that way. And of one that survived. She was TID and as part of her work went scuba diving to study orcas in the wild. Whilst she got away with doing this many times, there was one occasion when she went hypo some metres underwater. She was barely conscious apparently and was brought to the surface by 2 orca. If you go skindiving/scuba diving whilst on insulin you cannot count on friends ( or dolphins, orca) to necessarily realise what is happening or to be at the right place at the right time. A trip in a glass-bottomed boat is (usually) far safer. I always wear a proper lifejacket on water too.
     
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  14. kitedoc

    kitedoc Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Finally, make sure you have a kit to dispose f your needles etc. If there is no authorised place at your holiday site ( such as a local pharmacy/chemist) to dispose of 'sharps' (= needles etc contaminated with blood) you may need to carry the kit back home and dispose of the sharps back home. As far as I know, syringes if emptied and flushed out can be disposed of in common garbage but it would be prudent to check on this first.
     
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